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Super moon, blue moon and other things luna


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« on: May 02, 2012, 04:47:16 pm »


'Supermoon' coming this weekend
 By Paul Harper


10:31 AM Wednesday May 2, 2012
 
 
The moon will appear larger this weekend than any other time this year.
 
This month's full moon coincides with its lunar perigee, the closest approach the moon makes to the earth, making the moon appear larger in the sky.
 
Dr Grant Christie, of Auckland's Stardome Observatory, said the moon should appear about 10 percent larger than normal.
 
"The moon's orbit is elliptical, so at various times it reaches its closest point to earth and therefore it appears a little bigger in the sky and a little brighter.
 
Dr Christie said the so-called "supermoon" will have a only slight effect on tides.
 
The last supermoon was March last year.
 
The moon will be at its fullest at 3.35pm New Zealand time on Sunday.

"It does reach its closest moment in a particular point in time, but in terms of the visual impact ... you wouldn't notice a difference half a day either side, frankly," Dr Christie said.
 


According to Space.com meteorologist Joe Rao, this month's perigee will also be the nearest the moon will get to the earth this year, as the distance of the moon's closest approach varies by about 3 percent.
 
The moon will be 356,955km from the earth.
 
Later this year the opposite will happen, with the November 28 full moon coinciding with the moon's apogee, its farthest approach, Space.com reports.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10802936
The tides don't seem to be any higher than for a normal full moon however according to the met service tide charts.
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« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2012, 07:56:06 pm »


From Calgary Television News....

Biggest full moon of year due this weekend

By CTVNews.ca Staff | Tuesday, May 01, 2012

The moon rises behind Century Tower at the University of Florida as seen from Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, Saturday, March 19, 2011 in Gainesville, Florida. — Photo: Associated Press.
The moon rises behind Century Tower at the University of Florida
as seen from Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, Saturday, March 19, 2011
in Gainesville, Florida. — Photo: Associated Press.


ANYONE wishing to lasso the moon for their sweetheart will have no better opportunity than Saturday night, when Earth's satellite provides a larger and closer target than normal.

The moon will be closer to the Earth than it will be at any other time of the year, a phenomenon known as a lunar perigee.

And coincidentally the moon will become full just two minutes after it reaches its closest point at 11:35 p.m. ET, creating a phenomenon known as a "supermoon."

The confluence of proximity and fullness are expected to result in a rare opportunity for skywatchers and astronomers to view an especially big and bright moon.

The last supermoon occurred in March, 2011.

According to the Lunar Perigee and Apogee Calculator, a website linked to by NASA, the moon will be 356,953 kilometres from the Earth on Saturday night.

The moon will reach its apogee, or furthest distance from the Earth, 13 days later on May 19, when it will be positioned 406,450 kilometres away.

Then on November 28, it will reach full moon status at its furthest distance from Earth — 406,364 kilometres. That will result in a much smaller and darker full moon than the one expected on Saturday.

According to Richard Nolle, the astrologer who coined the term supermoon, the phenomenon occurs any time the moon is full, and comes within 90 per cent of its closest approach to Earth within a given orbit.

"In short, Earth, Moon and Sun are all in a line, with Moon in its nearest approach to Earth," Nolle explained in a blog.

According to Space.com, the Saturday full moon will rise around sunset and remain visible in the sky until sunrise — the only time in May when the moon hangs in the sky all night without being visible during daylight hours.

While the supermoon is not expected to have any extreme weather of geological effects, it is expected to result in especially high and low tides in the world's oceans.


http://calgary.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120501/super-moon-may-skywatcher-opportunity-120501/20120501/?hub=CalgaryHome



‘Supermoon’ coming this weekend

By PAUL HARPER - The New Zealand Herald | 10:31AM - Wednesday, May 02, 2012

The last “supermoon” was seen in March 2011. — File photo: Glenn Taylor.
The last “supermoon” was seen in March 2011. — File photo: Glenn Taylor.

THE MOON will appear larger this weekend than any other time this year.

This month's full moon coincides with its lunar perigee, the closest approach the moon makes to the earth, making the moon appear larger in the sky.

Dr Grant Christie, of Auckland's Stardome Observatory, said the moon should appear about 10 percent larger than normal.

"The moon's orbit is elliptical, so at various times it reaches its closest point to earth and therefore it appears a little bigger in the sky and a little brighter.

Dr Christie said the so-called "supermoon" will have a only slight effect on tides.

The last supermoon was March last year.

The moon will be at its fullest at 3.35pm New Zealand time on Sunday.

"It does reach its closest moment in a particular point in time, but in terms of the visual impact ... you wouldn't notice a difference half a day either side, frankly," Dr Christie said.

According to Space.com meteorologist Joe Rao, this month's perigee will also be the nearest the moon will get to the earth this year, as the distance of the moon's closest approach varies by about 3 percent.

The moon will be 356,955km from the earth.

Later this year the opposite will happen, with the November 28 full moon coinciding with the moon's apogee, its farthest approach, Space.com reports.


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10802936
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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2013, 05:31:21 pm »


From the Los Angeles Times....

Supermoon 2013: Biggest full moon of the year shines this weekend

By DEBORAH NETBURN | 2:23PM - Friday, June 21, 2013

Look for the supermoon this weekend — the biggest full moon of the year. — Photo: Sean Smith/NASA.
Look for the supermoon this weekend — the biggest full moon of the year. — Photo: Sean Smith/NASA.

IT'S SUPERMOON TIME. Look to the sky this weekend to see the biggest, fullest and brightest moon of 2013.

The supermoon is the largest full moon of the year. On Sunday at 4:32 a.m. PDT the moon will be at its most full, just 22 minutes after it passes the closest point to the Earth in its eliptical orbit around our planet.

The average distance of the moon from the Earth is 238,000 miles. On Sunday morning, it will be just 221,824 miles away — or 16,176 miles closer than usual.

You don't have to plan anything fancy to see the largest full moon of the year. Stepping outside and looking up at the sky will do just fine.

And don't worry about setting your alarm clock to see the moon at the moments it is closest to us and at its fullest. It should still appear pretty full and bright Saturday night and even through Sunday night as well.

The supermoon may have a tiny effect on the Earth's tides, but even if you live near the beach you probably won't notice it. NASA officials say that tides may be an inch higher than usual.

It is also unlikely that you will discern any major difference in the size of the moon this weekend — though you may notice it is shining extra brightly.


http://www.latimes.com/news/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-supermoon-2013-june-20130621,0,7537609.story
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2014, 01:58:13 pm »


from The New Zealand Herald....

‘Super-duper’ full moon to appear in NZ skies

By CATHERINE GAFFANEY - APNZ | 10:22AM - Friday, August 08, 2014

The moon seen from Mount John.
The moon seen from Mount John.

A “SUPER DOOPER” FULL MOON that is bigger and brighter than any other moon this year will appear in the sky on Monday morning.

The full moon will occur at 6.10am but will reach perigee, the closest point to Earth, at 5.44am.

It would be another 20 years before a moon was as close to the earth, according to University of Canterbury astronomer Associate Professor Karen Pollard.

At its closest, the moon will be 356,896km away from Earth.

When seen on the horizon, it would seem much larger than when seen high in the sky because of an interesting optical illusion, Professor Pollard said.

“We saw a supermoon a month ago on July 12th and will see another one next month on September 9th. However, the supermoon this month is the closest and largest one for 2014,” she said.

“After September, the cycles of full moons and perigees get out of sync and it won't be for another year and 48 days that they align again and we are able to see more supermoons.”

The best time to see or photograph the moon was as it was rising on Sunday and Monday evening.




A close supermoon would result in more extreme spring tides, but this effect should not cause flooding unless combined with a strong weather system, Professor Pollard said.

The University of Canterbury's Mount John Observatory at Tekapo planned to produce high-resolution photos of the moon's surface.


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11305876
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2014, 07:56:38 pm »


Supermoon rising over New Zealand

The Dominion Post | 11:51AM - Sunday, 10 August 2014

Alex Macuer wasn't even aware there was a supermoon when taking this photo on Friday at Evans Bay Marina. “I just thought it was a beautiful moon.” — Photo: Alex Macuer.
Alex Macuer wasn't even aware there was a supermoon when taking this photo on Friday at
Evans Bay Marina. “I just thought it was a beautiful moon.” — Photo: Alex Macuer.


THE supermoon will be back over New Zealand early on August 11th and we'd love to see your amazing photos of this celestial phenomenon.

Tonight's full moon will be the year's biggest and brightest.

The supermoon will be at its fullest just after 6am tomorrow and cloud permitting, should be visible just south of west. Find out more about this cosmic treat HERE.

Last month, our readers sent in some sensational photos of the epic moon, and some of the best are featured below.

If you're out moon gazing tonight and take along your camera, hit the contribute button below to send us the results.




One Tree Hill and the supermoon. — Photo: Steve Clifton.
One Tree Hill and the supermoon. — Photo: Steve Clifton.

Friday night moon over Silverstream Upper Hutt. — Photo: Rebecca Henderson.
Friday night moon over Silverstream Upper Hutt. — Photo: Rebecca Henderson.

After driving through very heavy fog this glow appeared on the side of the road in Hamilton — it was the moon and itextended in to this spooky view of the temple. — Photo: Tisza Sargeant.
After driving through very heavy fog this glow appeared on the side of the road in Hamilton — it was the moon and itextended in to this
spooky view of the temple. — Photo: Tisza Sargeant.


The supermoon rising through the clouds next to Maungakiekie, taken from Mount Albert. — Photo: Jamie Wright.
The supermoon rising through the clouds next to Maungakiekie, taken from Mount Albert. — Photo: Jamie Wright.

Alistair Hayward got this shot as the moon was rising. — Photo: Alistair Hayward.
Alistair Hayward got this shot as the moon was rising. — Photo: Alistair Hayward.

Maggie Alasad sent in this spooky picture of the full moon. — Photo: Maggie Alasad.
Maggie Alasad sent in this spooky picture of the full moon. — Photo: Maggie Alasad.

Lindsay Breach took this picture in North Canterbury through a telescope. — Photo: Lindsay Breach.
Lindsay Breach took this picture in North Canterbury through a telescope. — Photo: Lindsay Breach.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/10264719/Supermoon-rising-over-New-Zealand
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2014, 12:12:23 pm »


from the Wairarapa Times-Age....

Supermoon puts on a light show

By NATHAN CROMBIE | 6:34AM - Tuesday, August 12, 2014

LUNAR SPECTACLE: The “supermoon” above Mount Rangitumau near Masterton at dusk on Sunday evening. — Photo: TINA NIXON.
LUNAR SPECTACLE: The “supermoon” above Mount Rangitumau near Masterton at dusk
on Sunday evening. — Photo: TINA NIXON.


THE "supermoon" that loomed large in Wairarapa skies on Sunday evening was heaven sent for snap-happy photographers in the region.

Images of the phenomenon that caught the breath of viewers online included one captured by photographer Tina Nixon about dusk on Sunday of the Moon above Mount Rangitumau near Masterton, and an image of the Cape Palliser Lighthouse silhouetted against the Moon.

Ms Nixon, a former journalist, said she was pleased the Hawke's Bay Today and New Zealand Herald websites had run her image of the supermoon.

She had several years ago uploaded a video she shot of a “moonbow” over the Tararua Ranges that had so far claimed about 26,000 views and said the moon “always looks spectacular rising up over the Rangitumau ridge”.

Mark Gee, Royal Observatory astronomy photographer of the year, also shot an outstanding image of the supermoon hanging above the Cape Palliser Lighthouse on Sunday.

He says on his Facebook page the image was taken 3.7km from the lighthouse.

“It was a challenge to find a location to shoot the moonrise. Cloud threatened the party in Wellington, so I drove for a few hours to a location I have spent many nights photographing the stars,” he said.

“It was tricky to get a perfect line-up and it didn't work out exactly as planned, but I'm still happy with the result. And check out the people next to the lighthouse as a good scale reference.”

The supermoon can cause real physical effects on Earth, including larger than usual tides, according to EarthSky.org. There were five supermoons crowding the calendar this year, the website posted, including the two new moons of January, and the full moons of July, August and September.

The moon was expected to appear even larger on Sunday evening than the June supermoon, as it fell closer to the perigee — its closest point to the Earth.

The moon and Earth will not have such a close encounter again — 356,896km from the centre of each heavenly body — until September 28th next year.


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa-times-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503414&objectid=11307519
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