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This week's “shooting rampage” in the gUn-happy States of America


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Author Topic: This week's “shooting rampage” in the gUn-happy States of America  (Read 6588 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #475 on: October 07, 2017, 10:44:33 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

A brotherly journey from Alaska to Vegas ends in sorrow

He talked his pal into going, only to die in his arms.

By JOE MOZINGO | Friday, October 06, 2017

Brian MacKinnon drives the car rented by his friend Adrian Murfitt through Las Vegas after the Strip reopened. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Brian MacKinnon drives the car rented by his friend Adrian Murfitt through Las Vegas after the Strip reopened.
 — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.


HE STROLLED INTO a western-wear store with money to spend, fresh off a record season fishing sockeye salmon on his friend's purse seiner.

The Alaskan gray and drizzle was setting in and Adrian Murfitt couldn't wait for his trip to see some country music in the desert.

He needed just the right hat.

He was surprised to find his long-lost friend Donny Millions tending the cash register. As Murfitt shopped, they chatted for over an hour about old times playing hockey and football in the street.

Murfitt picked black $275 Tony Lama boots with stacked leather soles, a belt with a big silver buckle, a Wrangler shirt and a black buffalo-skin Stetson hat. The boss was out and Millions gave Murfitt a $100 discount.

They swapped numbers and planned to get together when Murfitt got back. He left with a laugh and the vaguely goofy grin his friends loved.

They hadn't seen him this happy in years. He had finally worked through a long, painful breakup. He had lost 30 pounds on the fishing boat. He was lean and looking good, ready to see his favorite singer, Jason Aldean, in Vegas.


AVONNA MURFITT worried about her son. When he split with his girlfriend of seven years, Christina Hoglin, the couple had to sell their house and divide up their four dogs. Adrian was broke and devastated. He could not find solace in snowboarding or rebuilding cars like he used to.

He trudged through spring, working at a friend's refrigeration repair company, drinking too much beer, putting on weight.

He spent the summer with his friend and captain, Sean Alexander, fishing off the capes of the Alaskan Peninsula. He thrived as deck boss, engineer, chef, the skiffman positioning the nets. The two fishermen had grown up in the same neighborhood and roomed together in college in Washington.


Avonna Murfitt takes her son's dog for a walk outside the office where she works as a paralegal in Anchorage. — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.
Avonna Murfitt takes her son's dog for a walk outside the office where she works as a paralegal in Anchorage.
 — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.


Three months at sea seemed to wash the gloom away from Adrian Murfitt, front. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Three months at sea seemed to wash the gloom away from Adrian Murfitt, front. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.

The three months at sea with Alexander seemed to wash all that gloom away.

Murfitt came home and was back to his old teasing self. He now had money and a plan.

He and Alexander were going to buy another seiner for Murfitt to captain.

His mother urged him to save some of the $50,000 or so he had made. He promised he would.

But he had things to take care of first. He paid off a credit card that he and his mom owed money on. He bought car parts and fixed her Yukon and his truck, to give to his nephew, who would be getting his driver's license soon. And he was planning his trip.

He rented a room at the Luxor and a BMW convertible to cruise the Strip. He just needed to get his friend Brian MacKinnon on board.

On Thursday, September 24th, six days before his Vegas trip, he went to Eddie's Sports Bar on Old Seward Highway. It was line-dancing night.

Murfitt, 35, had a tight group of buddies from South Anchorage who, naturally, called him “Murf” — one of the cleaner nicknames in the group.

They were North Slope roughnecks, crab fishermen, truck drivers, mechanics and construction workers, all local boys. None of them were as enthusiastic about country music as he was. They ribbed him about his hats, but his enthusiasm — and his coy way of guilting them to join in — usually pulled them along.

“Don't make me go alone,” he'd say with his smile.

So half a dozen of them came to line dance, drink beer and shoot pool.


Brian MacKinnon drives through Las Vegas in the days after the shooting. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Brian MacKinnon drives through Las Vegas in the days after the shooting. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.

Murfitt got the bug for country music from his mother, and it stuck hard. “He used to sing in the shower, and you could have made a record out of it,” Avonna said. “He sounded like Alan Jackson.”

On rap nights at another bar, he'd ask the DJ to play Jason Aldean to needle his friends.

At Eddie's that night, Murfitt buttonholed MacKinnon and made his pitch about Vegas.

“Don't make me go alone,” he said.

“No, man, I can't swing it.”

“Come on, I'll pay for it,” Murfitt said. He pulled up his phone to look for tickets from Anchorage to Las Vegas.

MacKinnon excused himself to the bathroom.

Murfitt knew that MacKinnon, of all his friends, needed this trip. He drove dump trucks seasonally and was an inventor and founder of a company that sold tough aluminum personal watercraft for fishermen, hunters and rescuers to explore Alaskan wilds. He shared custody of his two girls, ages 6 and 8, whom Murfitt treated like nieces.

But in recent years, several of MacKinnon's friends had died of drug overdoses, suicide, alcohol poisoning. He was in the room when one of them passed.

“Bought 'em,” Murf said when he came back.

MacKinnon laughed. Murfitt gave him a bear hug.

“We're going to Vegas.”


The hat display at Silva Saddle Western Wear in Anchorage. Adrian Murfitt had purchased a Stetson there for his trip to Las Vegas. — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.
The hat display at Silva Saddle Western Wear in Anchorage. Adrian Murfitt had purchased a Stetson there for his trip to Las Vegas.
 — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.


Sean Alexander gets emotional as he listens to Cole Swindell's song “You Should Be Here” on the radio. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Sean Alexander gets emotional as he listens to Cole Swindell's song “You Should Be Here” on the radio.
 — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.


ALEXANDER met them in Las Vegas and the three played tourist, hitting bars and restaurants, cruising the strip in the convertible, checking out the bands at the Route 91 Harvest Festival.

The first night they went to a Brazilian steakhouse and marveled at how much beef they could get for the price. They ate too much, went back to the room and passed out. They went back the next night, but kept their eating under control so they could stay out late.

MacKinnon and Murfitt, both tall and broad-shouldered, stood out in a crowd. Seeing Murfitt's hat, people stopped to pose next to him for selfies, as if he were a real Wild West cowboy.

Murfitt had a childlike way of complimenting a woman without being creepy.

“I like your glitter,” he said to one sparkly cheeked woman standing next to him at the Eric Church concert.

She thanked him and offered him a shot of Tito's vodka she had smuggled in as water. As she later recounted on Facebook:

“He had lost his friends … and I was hanging solo, so we buddied up for a bit … and he was excited to be in Vegas for Route 91 and he liked my red hair. He was friendly and nice, and all smiles.”

“At one point, Adrian placed his cowboy hat on my head, and I decided to take a Snapchat of the moment.”

Murfitt called his mother on Sunday afternoon, elated about the Eric Church concert.

“What do you want for your birthday, Mom?” she remembered Adrian asking.

She was turning 70 in a few weeks. She told him to save his money. She just wanted one of his “mechanic certificates” for free maintenance.


Donny Millions emotionally recounts his final interaction with Adrian Murfitt at the western wear shop where he helps out, the Silva Saddle in Anchorage. — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.
Donny Millions emotionally recounts his final interaction with Adrian Murfitt at the western wear shop where he helps out, the Silva Saddle
in Anchorage. — Photograph: Ash Adams/Los Angeles Times.


On the festival grounds, he stumbled into his ex-girlfriend Hoglin, among the thousands.

“How'd you find me?”

“Because you're my angel. I'll always be able to find you.”

They talked, even brought up the idea of getting back together, according to Murfitt's mother, who heard about the exchange from Hoglin.

As Aldean was ready to perform, MacKinnon pulled his friend away. Murfitt said they should push up to the front.

Their size made it difficult, but they got near the right-center of the stage, Murfitt behind MacKinnon. Aldean was singing “When She Says Baby”.


Kamryn Trubey shows Brian MacKinnon photos of his childhood friend Adrian Murfitt taken with Trubey when they met at the concert before the mass shooting changed their lives forever. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Kamryn Trubey shows Brian MacKinnon photos of his childhood friend Adrian Murfitt taken with Trubey when they met at the concert
before the mass shooting changed their lives forever. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.


Murfitt wanted to take a selfie when what sounded like a string of firecrackers distracted them.

“That's one way to clear the crowd to get up front,” someone joked.

Murfitt got back in picture pose when a second round of cracks hit. MacKinnon just wanted him to take the picture so he could watch the concert.

Murfitt turned toward the snapping sound and fell, just as something ricocheting off the ground knocked MacKinnon's hat off his head.

He looked down at his friend and saw blood and a gaping hole in his throat.

“He's bleeding!” MacKinnon shouted. “He's bleeding in his neck!”

He crouched over him, in shock. Murfitt didn't speak. He just looked straight at him, MacKinnon said, with a confused expression.

MacKinnon scanned the crowd, figuring someone nearby was firing a gun.

An off-duty firefighter started to help; he tried to open Murfitt's mouth to clear his airway.


Brian MacKinnon (left) and Adrian Murfitt at the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas. — Photograph: Brian MacKinnon.
Brian MacKinnon (left) and Adrian Murfitt at the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas. — Photograph: Brian MacKinnon.

Bullets kept snapping off the pavement — and thudding into flesh. The constant report of a rifle in the Mandalay Bay tower slowly made the situation clear.

“I'm a doctor, I'm a doctor,” a man said. The doctor and firefighter started to give Murfitt CPR.

Murfitt started turning blue in his face. He just kept looking up at MacKinnon.

“I got hit,” the doctor said. A bullet had struck him in the leg. He ran away with the crowd that was screaming and fleeing by now.

The firefighter stayed a few more moments, then turned to MacKinnon.

“We gotta go, we gotta go,” he said. “I've seen this. He's not coming back from this one.”

He ran to help someone else.

Murfitt took his last gulps of air, all the time staring at MacKinnon.

Then he stopped breathing.

Someone ran up, “He's gone, he's gone.”

“No, he's not!” MacKinnon shouted.


Police cordon off the area where the mass shooting killed 58 people on Sunday. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Police cordon off the area where the mass shooting killed 58 people on Sunday. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.

Gunfire rained down close to him from the Mandalay, and he ran for cover behind some railing.

He could see his friend lying alone out there. He couldn't take it. He was overcome with anger.

He hurried back to Murfitt, sat cross-legged next to him, and picked up the Stetson and put it on himself. He rested his hand on his friend's chest and cried.

People were running around tending to the wounded — police, firefighters, military, nurses carrying the injured out on pieces of gates even as the gunfire continued.

They told MacKinnon he had to leave. “I'm not leaving!” he said.

A paramedic came up to him and said, “Do you have kids?”

He saw the faces of his girls, Miley and Carmen.

“Let me take you to your kids,” she said.

He snapped out of his state of shock and walked with her. He got behind a barricade and waited until the shooting finally stopped. But no one would let him go back to see Murfitt.

“I can't see any more dead people,” a cop told him.


Brian MacKinnon retrieved Adrian Murfitt's new cowboy hat and took it back to their hotel room. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.
Brian MacKinnon retrieved Adrian Murfitt's new cowboy hat and took it back to their hotel room. — Photograph: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times.

MacKinnon walked over by the Tropicana, aimless. He got pushed into a scrum of people hiding in the basement. They did not know what was happening. He was covered in blood. He kept himself from sobbing. He got to a bathroom and let his grief roll over him. He cried for five minutes.

He made his way back to the Luxor and charged his phone. Murfitt's bed looked like he had just climbed out of it. His cologne was in the air. MacKinnon glanced at the box that had held the Stetson Murfitt had bought at the Silva Saddle.

When MacKinnon turned his phone on, he saw calls missed from Alaska. Dozens of people's lives were going to fall apart when he talked to them.


MURFITT'S BODY eventually made it to the coroner.

His family in Anchorage has been trying to get it released. Alaska Airlines has offered to fly his remains home at no charge.

MacKinnon is waiting in the room Murfitt rented, grieving, unwilling to leave until he gets on the plane with his friend.


Joe Mozingo reported from Anchorage, Alaska.

• Joe Mozingo is a projects reporter for the Los Angeles Times. He won a Robert F. Kennedy Award for covering the earthquake in Haiti and the ASNE Punch Sulzberger Award for Online Storytelling for his in-depth look at a federal investigation into relic poaching in rural Utah that led to three suicides. Mozingo helped lead the L.A. Times' coverage of the Isla Vista killings in 2014 and a Miami Herald investigation into the space shuttle Columbia crash in 2003; both were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. His book, The Fiddler on Pantico Run: An African Warrior, His White Descendants, a Search for Family was a 2012 “Discover Great New Writers” pick by Barnes and Noble.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • How to stop a sniper like Stephen Paddock? Police sharpshooters firing from helicopters is one idea.

 • Mandalay Bay gunman spent two weeks in Las Vegas before killings; researched outdoor concerts in other large cities.


http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-vegas-victim-alaska-friends-20161006-htmlstory.html
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« Reply #476 on: November 06, 2017, 08:34:02 pm »


from The Washington Post....

At least 26 dead in South Texas church shooting, officials say

The shooting occurred at a church in South Texas, not far from San Antonio.

By PETER HOLLEY, EVA RUTH MORAVEC, KRISTINE PHILLIPS and WESLEY LOWERY | 10:14PM EST - Sunday, November 05, 2017

The scene of a fatal shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, near San Antonio. — Photograph: Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman/Associated Press.
The scene of a fatal shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, near San Antonio.
 — Photograph: Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman/Associated Press.


SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, TEXAS — A lone gunman stormed into a small community church here on Sunday and shot and killed more than two dozen people before fleeing and later being found dead several miles from the scene, authorities said.

Witnesses said a white male in his 20s, dressed in all black and wearing a tactical vest, started shooting with an assault rifle as he approached the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs. Police say the gunman killed two people outside before entering the church and spraying bullets throughout the congregation during morning services in this countryside town about 30 miles southeast of San Antonio. Dozens of people were hit with bullets, and the dead ranged in age from 5 to 72, authorities said. Most were shot in the pews as they worshiped.

“At this moment in time, there are 26 lives that have been lost,” Texas Governor Greg Abbott said during an early evening news conference. “We don't know if that number will rise or not, all we know is that's too many and this will be a long, suffering mourning for those in pain.”

Two law enforcement officials told The Washington Post that the suspect has been identified as Devin Kelley, 26, a Texas man who lived in a nearby county. Those officials did not see any immediate sign that he was motivated by international terror groups, but they cautioned that the investigation is still in its early stages.

Authorities had not yet provided any information about a possible motive for the shooting as of Sunday evening, and residents of this small out-of-the-way town said they were rattled and dumbfounded to become yet another U.S. community victimized by an inexplicable mass shooting.

Neighbors said they became aware of the shooting when they heard loud bangs — and even had bullets spray into their homes — shortly after 11 a.m. on Sunday. Local authorities said the first calls of an active shooter came at about 11:20 a.m., after the gunman opened fire with a Ruger assault rifle.

Kevin Jordan, 30, was changing the oil in his Ford Focus ahead of a family road trip when he heard the pops of gunfire. When he stood up and turned his head, he saw a man wearing body armor, a vest and a mask walking down the sidewalk towards the church about 50 yards from his home.

“He was just spraying at the front of the church,” Jordan said. “He was shooting outside at first and then he walked to the door and started shooting inside.”


Law enforcement at the church. ABC affiliate KSAT reports that a man walked into the church, opened fire and was later killed by police. A dispatcher for the Wilson County sheriff declined to confirm and said information would be released later. — Photograph: Max Massey/KSAT 12/Reuters.
Law enforcement at the church. ABC affiliate KSAT reports that a man walked into the church, opened fire and was later killed. A dispatcher for
the Wilson County sheriff declined to confirm and said information would be released later. — Photograph: Max Massey/KSAT 12/Reuters.


Wilson County Commissioner Albert Gamez Jr. said 26 are dead and more than 20 injured. The gunman has been killed, he said. — Photograph: Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman/Associated Press.
Wilson County Commissioner Albert Gamez Jr. said 26 are dead and more than 20 injured. The gunman has been killed, he said.
 — Photograph: Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman/Associated Press.


Authorities said that at least 23 of the slain were killed inside the church, two people were shot and killed outside, and one additional person died at an area hospital. As the gunman exited the church, he was confronted by a local citizen who, armed with his own weapon, began firing — prompting the suspect to flee in his vehicle.

“The local citizen pursued him,” said Freeman Martin, a regional director for the Texas Department of Public Service, who said the gunman crashed off of the roadway about 11 miles north of the shooting scene and was later found there, dead. “We don't know if it was a self-inflicted gunshot wound or if he was shot by our local resident who engaged him in a gunfight.”

Authorities said they found multiple weapons in the gunman's vehicle.

After spotting the shooter, Jordan said he ran inside his home, scooped up his son and grabbed his wife and rushed his family inside his bathroom, where they crouched down and hid while calling 911. He said the shooter spotted him as he fled and took a shot that went though his front window, nearly hitting his 2-year-old son.

“I looked at the shooter and he looked right at me,” he said.  When the shooting stopped, Jordan, who works as a medical assistant, ran to the church, hoping to help.

“I walked inside and just walked out — I couldn't handle it,” he said. “It was bad. A lot of blood and bodies. The pews were knocked over. I'm a medical assistant and medical assisting does not prepare you for this.”

Tucked a few hundred yards off Highway 87, amid scrubby farmland, the dusty and usually quiet streets of Sutherland Springs, lined with modest one-story family homes and trailers, were swarming with law enforcement on Sunday evening. With few street lights, a town that typically goes dark after sundown had flashing red and blue police lights on almost every block.


A helicopter flies near the site of the mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, a small town more than 30 miles southeast of San Antonio. — Photograph: Max Massey/KSAT 12/Reuters.
A helicopter flies near the site of the mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, a small town more than 30 miles southeast of San Antonio.
 — Photograph: Max Massey/KSAT 12/Reuters.


Police block the roads surrounding the church in Sutherland Springs. The motive of the gunman is not immediately known. — Photograph: Suzanne Cordeiro/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Police block the roads surrounding the church in Sutherland Springs. The motive of the gunman is not immediately known.
 — Photograph: Suzanne Cordeiro/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Federal authorities, including from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the FBI, were on the scene. The Texas Ranger Division of the state's Department of Public Safety also is involved in the investigation.

The shooting on Sunday came more than a month after a masked gunman stormed into a small community church outside of Nashville and shot seven people, including the pastor, killing one. Authorities said the suspect in that shooting, Emanuel Kidega Samson, might have been motivated by a quest for revenge for a 2015 shooting that targeted black churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina — a shooting that left nine people dead.

It also came just more than a month after 58 people were killed at a Las Vegas country music festival, in what was the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history; the assailant, Stephen Paddock, killed himself after a lengthy shooting spree from his 32nd floor Mandalay Bay hotel suite.

Few details were immediately available about Kelley, and attempts to reach his family were unsuccessful on Sunday. Kelley had at one point been in the military, enlisting in 2010 and serving as a logistical readiness airman stationed at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico, according to Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek.

He was court-martialed in 2012 and sentenced to a year in military prison for assaulting his spouse and child, she said. He was reduced in rank and released with a bad conduct discharge in 2014.

It was unclear on Sunday how Kelley obtained the weapon he used or why he targeted the church. Neighbors said the gunshots they heard were thundering.

Diana Segura, 69, was in the shower on Sunday morning at about 11 a.m. when she was startled by a series of bangs so loud she thought a truck's engine had exploded on the highway behind her home. Minutes later, sirens burst onto her quiet street and Segura walked outside and saw the unthinkable: multiple bodies on the ground outside the First Baptist Church, where she occasionally attends weeknight services. Standing outside her home down the street from the church, Segura stared at the throng of police cars and emergency vehicles, her head shaking in disbelief.

“This is a small town and nothing never happens here,” Segura said. “We are family here, and that church is always filled with friends.”


Texas Governor Greg Abbott gives an update during a news conference at the Stockdale Community Center following the shooting. — Photograph: Sergio Flores/Reuters.
Texas Governor Greg Abbott gives an update during a news conference at the Stockdale Community Center following the shooting.
 — Photograph: Sergio Flores/Reuters.


Flags are lowered to half staff outside the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. — Photograph: Larry W. Smith/EPA/Agencia-EFE.
Flags are lowered to half staff outside the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. — Photograph: Larry W. Smith/EPA/Agencia-EFE.

Frank Pomeroy, the pastor of First Baptist Church, told ABC News that he was not present during the church service but that his teenage daughter, Annabelle Pomeroy, 14, was among the dead.

“She was very quiet, shy, always smiling, and helpful to all,” Cynthia Rangel, 50, a resident of Stockdale, said of Annabelle Pomeroy. Rangel, a local emergency medical technician, said she knew three individuals who were hospitalized after the shooting and were undergoing surgery. “This just all seems like it's not real.”

Dana Fletcher, who owns a business a quarter of a mile from the church, said she and her family just moved to Sutherland Springs. She said she was first alerted of the shooting after receiving a call from a reporter.

“My husband and I both are still in shock,” she said. “It's a little tiny church that was targeted. It's shocking. It's a bit frightening because it's a little bit close to home.”

President Trump addressed the shooting while traveling in Asia on Sunday, sending his thoughts and prayers to the victims and families.

“This act of evil occurred as the victims and their families were in their place of sacred worship,” Trump said. “We cannot put into words the pain and grief we all feel and we cannot begin to imagine the suffering of those who lost the ones they so dearly loved. Our hearts are broken but in dark times, and these are dark times, such as these, American do what they do best — we pull together. We join hands, we lock arms and through the tears and through the sadness we stand strong, oh so strong.”




Carrie Matula, who works at a gas station near the church, told MSNBC that she ran out to see what was happening after hearing gunshots.

“I never thought it would happen here,” she said. “This is something that happens in a big city. I would have never thought this would have taken place here. It's just too tight a community. It doesn't make sense.”

The church is a part of the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in the country with about 15 million members. First Baptist reported an average estimated attendance of 100 in 2015. The church is affiliated with the Southern Baptists of Texas Convention, considered one of Texas's more theologically conservative group of Southern Baptists.

Kathy Forton, 65, who has lived much of her life in the rural area of Wilson County, said the town has suffered an economic downturn since the county seat was moved to Floresville after a fire many years ago.

“The church helped out in so many ways, ” Forton said. “Just the most precious loving people. The people from the church used their own money to provide turkeys for the community at Thanksgiving, and presents for kids at Christmas. The loss of these people is going to devastate that community.”


Peter Holley and Eva Ruth Moravec Moravec reported from Sutherland Springs, Texas; Kristine Phillips and Wesley Lowery reported from Washington. Mary Lee Grace in San Antonio; and Sarah Pulliam Bailey, Ed O'Keefe, Alex Horton and Devlin Barrett in Washington contributed to this report.

• Peter Holley is a technology reporter at The Washington Post.

• Eva Ruth Moravec is a freelance reporter who writes about officer-involved shootings of unarmed individuals in Texas for a grant-funded series published in several Texas newspapers. She is also currently pursuing her Master's degree in Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Moravec covered the 2015 Texas legislative session for the Associated Press and has freelanced for local, state and national news outlets, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, Moravec worked for several years as a staff reporter covering public safety and later government for the San Antonio Express-News.

• Kristine Phillips is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post.

• Wesley Lowery is a national reporter covering law enforcement and justice for The Washington Post. He previously covered Congress and national politics.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Multiple deaths in Texas church shooting

 • VIDEO: At least 26 killed in shooting at South Texas church

 • Man linked to Texas shooting faced military court martial

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: Photos of the scene after a shooting in a Texas church


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/11/05/reports-multiple-people-shot-at-texas-church
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« Reply #477 on: November 07, 2017, 08:51:58 pm »

How is the kiwi gun nuts shooting hikers, campers and even their own mates phenomena going these days?
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« Reply #478 on: November 07, 2017, 08:53:52 pm »


Ah, yes.....the head-fucked “let's try to divert attention elsewhere rather than actually discuss the topic” attitude you get from stupid retards.
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« Reply #479 on: November 07, 2017, 09:03:05 pm »

Keep your hair on 😀
America's gun genie is well and truly out of the bottle. Half the country there beleives gun ownership is an intrinsic right.
NZ hunters should know better. NZ hunters should not be allowed anywhere near non hunters (ie they should be in a zone at least 5kms from any non hunters).
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« Reply #480 on: November 07, 2017, 09:11:51 pm »


I'm starting to think I should hold a HUGE celebration every time there is a mass shooting in America.

'cause the NRA is quite right....guns don't kill people, people with guns kill people.

So exterminating all American people with guns will start to solve the problem.

And every time an American with a gun runs amok killing heaps more Americans, it means less Americans in the world.

And every DEAD American is one less stupid retard in the world.

So perhaps gun massacres in America are really doing the rest of the world a huge favour.
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« Reply #481 on: November 09, 2017, 03:50:43 am »

I want to see all the white trash nazi leftist exterminated like you do with mad rabid dogs

Our planet will be a great place and much better off without retarded white trash commie scum


« Last Edit: November 10, 2017, 03:14:01 am by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
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« Reply #482 on: November 10, 2017, 12:41:41 pm »



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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #483 on: November 12, 2017, 03:41:13 am »

'You have to be prepared'

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/11/10/us/texas-gun-culture-sutherland-springs-church-shooting/index.html
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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