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 91 
 on: November 04, 2018, 11:46:15 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Early voters surge to polls

Many have already cast ballots, suggesting a record turnout.

By EVAN HALPER and MAYA SWEEDLER | Saturday, November 03, 2018

People cast ballots on Thursday at an early-voting center at UC Irvine, ahead of election day on Tuesday. — Photograph: Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times.
People cast ballots on Thursday at an early-voting center at UC Irvine, ahead of election day on Tuesday. — Photograph: Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times.

WASHINGTON D.C. — Voters across the country have been crowding into polling places and mailing in ballots in numbers rarely seen in an off-year election, pointing toward a possible record turnout for Tuesday's contest and leaving operatives from across the political spectrum trying to read tea leaves to figure out what it means.

In some states, more people are on track to cast ballots in early voting than in the entire election in 2014. In Texas, one such state, hundreds of thousands of new voters have already participated. Democrats hope that surge indicates that their Senate candidate, Representative Beto O'Rourke, may be succeeding in mobilizing a crucial demographic.

But Republicans are also energized, turning out in larger numbers than Democrats so far in Florida, for example, where a cliffhanger of a race for governor features a Trump acolyte competing against an unabashed progressive who would be the state's first African American governor.

The picture in California is more status quo. The state has at least half a dozen hotly contested congressional districts, which could play a big role in whether Democrats take back a majority in the U.S. House. But in the remaining districts, the lack of a close race at the top of the ticket is holding down turnout, said Paul Mitchell, vice president of Political Data, which compiles voter data in the state.

California was one of the country's pioneers in widespread early voting, and at this point, a large majority of voters get their ballots in the mail and either send them back or drop them at a polling station. Some three million ballots had been cast in the state by Friday.

Nationwide, as early voting was coming to a close in many states on Friday, more than 30 million ballots had already been cast. Turnout is hitting a pace closer to what's typically seen in presidential elections. It has the potential to be the highest in an off-year election since 1966.

“When you look at some of these states, the numbers are eye-popping,” said Michael McDonald, a political science professor at the University of Florida and one of the country's leading experts on voting patterns.

Mid-term elections typically draw far fewer voters than presidential contests. In 2016, about 60% of voting-eligible Americans cast ballots, according to McDonald's compilations of state data. In 2014, only 37% voted — the lowest turnout in years. The trends so far indicate that close to half of those eligible will vote this time, McDonald estimates.

Because Democrats rely heavily on the votes of younger people and minorities, who are less consistent about voting than are older whites, their candidates usually benefit from a higher turnout.

As a result, Democrats hope that the numbers so far point to their much-ballyhooed blue wave, but they are reluctant to say as much. Misinterpretation of early-voting trends in 2016 helped land egg on a lot of faces after Donald Trump's surprise victory.

Early-voting figures can easily mislead. States release a trove of data about who the voters are — information on their party affiliations, voting history, age and so on. But no one knows for which candidate those voters cast a ballot. Nor can anyone be sure whether people who vote early are simply the same voters who would have otherwise shown up on election day.

In Texas, both O'Rourke and incumbent Senator Ted Cruz suggested the state's huge early turnout would boost their campaigns. Texas is still a deeply conservative place, and more voters coming to the polls can only mean more support for him, Cruz suggested in a CBS60 Minutes” segment released on Friday.

O'Rourke said much the same on the show: “The more people who show up, the better we do.”

The results on Tuesday will reveal who is right. But one thing is clear: The numbers already are Texas-sized.

If current trends hold, some 3 million more people will vote this year in Texas than did during the last mid-term, in 2014, said Tom Bonier, chief executive of TargetSmart, a Democratic data firm closely tracking early voting. “That's amazing,” Bonier said.

The state is also drawing first-time voters to the polls. Already, Bonier said, more than 300,000 people who were eligible to vote in the 2016 presidential election but did not show up that year have cast ballots in Texas.

“Texas is leading the way by a long shot in first-time voting,” Bonier said. “It is not nearly as much a factor in other states.”

In California's seven most competitive districts — all currently held by Republicans — registered GOP voters have returned ballots at a slightly higher clip than registered Democrats. Of the approximately 530,000 ballots returned, almost 193,000 came from registered Republicans, compared with 177,000 from registered Democrats, according to Political Data.

How that translates into votes, however, remains a big question. Democrats expect to pick up votes in suburban districts from a significant number of Republicans whose party affiliation does not necessarily signal loyalty or approval of President Trump.

Turnout is trending highest in the four competitive House districts in Orange County and north Los Angeles County. And there has been an uptick in younger, independent voters in coastal counties who didn't participate in the primary. That's likely a good sign for Democrats, Mitchell said. Such voters tend to be progressive.

California is not the only state where younger voters are hitting the polls in force. In Georgia, voters younger than 30 have been casting early ballots at quadruple the rate they did in 2014. In Texas and Nevada, voting by young people is up fivefold. The rate is triple in Arizona, according to TargetSmart.

In Nevada, Democrats have built a small but persistent statewide lead in early votes, said Jon Ralston of the Nevada Independent, who closely tracks the state's vote.

Some bellwether districts in the Midwest also have provided encouraging signs for Democrats. One is Iowa's 1st Congressional District, located in a swing region where voting analysts first started to notice a migration toward the GOP as early ballots were cast in the 2016 election.

Now, registered Democrats are showing back up in force. The party balance is 10 points more favorable to Democrats than it was at this point in 2016, McDonald said.

“These are huge changes,” he added. “It signals enthusiasm among Democrats and that Republicans are not as engaged in these key swing districts they will need.”

The shift evident in early-voting patterns in such districts could have broader implications for several competitive governors races in the Midwest, where Democrats are mounting strong challenges in states now controlled by Republicans, McDonald added.

But he noted that in other parts of the country, Republicans are making a strong showing of their own.

In Florida, for example, registered Republicans continued to edge out Democrats in early voting through Friday. The trend is consistent with Florida's early-voting patterns from past years, and Democratic vote counters point out that the GOP advantage has shrunk compared with 2014.

Overall, the most either side can tell is what has consistently been true of Florida since 2000: The statewide contests are likely to be very close.


__________________________________________________________________________

Evan Halper reported from Washington and Maya Sweedler from Los Angeles.

• Evan Halper writes about a broad range of policy issues out of Washington D.C. for the Los Angeles Times, with particular emphasis on how Washington regulates, agitates and very often miscalculates in its dealings with California. Before heading east, he was the L.A. Times bureau chief in Sacramento, where he spent a decade untangling California's epic budget mess and political dysfunction.

• Maya Sweedler is a freelance journalist who writes for a large number of publications, including the Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, Muckrake and Yale News. She is based in Los Angeles.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=a0ffb6a8-922c-4bf0-a59d-6f6c30f5b1b6

 92 
 on: November 04, 2018, 10:06:17 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

WOW....those stupid righties cannot even do a Photoshop job that isn't patently obvious it is an amateur Photoshop job.

No wonder they are so dumb that they support a con-artist, liar and fraudster like Donald J. Trump.

Stupidity is obviously an inherent trait of righties.

 93 
 on: November 04, 2018, 10:04:25 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

It's excellent news that RECORD numbers of young people are registering and voting early in the mid-term elections.

And as most young people have more liberal views, that should be good for shoving one right up the clacker of that stupid moron Donald J. Trump aka President Dumb.

 94 
 on: November 04, 2018, 02:17:50 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
you are a commie self hating=white moron dumb fuck




 95 
 on: November 04, 2018, 02:03:26 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
so the guy murders 2 people to rob them and do you think they should let him go?
was his life worth more than 2 lives?

 96 
 on: November 04, 2018, 01:38:54 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
hes probly a wind up dem supporter because they are fucked in the head
look at them


 97 
 on: November 03, 2018, 10:54:57 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 98 
 on: November 03, 2018, 12:29:43 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Two news stories from the past couple of days: ELECTROCUTION, stupid Jesuslanders-style … versus ELECTROCUTION, ENZED-style…



from The Washington Post…

‘Let's rock’: The last words of a double-murderer
who chose the electric chair over lethal injection


The request by Edmund Zagorski, who committed a double murder
in 1983, exposed the flaws of lethal injection, experts said.


By ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER | 4:57AM EDT — Friday, November 02, 2018

In this 1999 photo, Ricky Bell, then the warden at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution in Nashville, gives a tour of the prison's execution chamber. — Photograph: Mark Humphrey/Associated Press.
In this 1999 photo, Ricky Bell, then the warden at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution in Nashville, gives a tour of the prison's execution chamber.
 — Photograph: Mark Humphrey/Associated Press.


“LET'S ROCK,” he said from a death chamber within Riverbend Maximum Security Institution in Nashville.

Those were Edmund Zagorski's final words before the jolts of electrical current shot through his body. His hands remained clenched, except for his pinkie fingers. They were either dislocated or broken, his attorney would later say, from straining against the straps of the electric chair in which Zagorski, 63, died on Thursday at 7:26 p.m. local time.

The state put the double-murderer to death by electrocution, spurning lethal injection at his request. His death made him the first inmate in five years to perish in the electric chair — and only the second in Tennessee since 1960. Daryl Holton, a Gulf War veteran who killed his four children in a marital dispute, chose the electric chair in 2007.

Tennessee is among only a handful of states where the electric chair is still an option in executions. Prisoners who committed their crimes before 1999 may choose to die by electrical voltage instead of a cocktail of drugs. Meanwhile, 30 states allow some form of capital punishment. One of them is Pennsylvania, where federal prosecutors have begun the process of seeking a possible death sentence against Robert Bowers, the man accused of gunning down 11 congregants in a Pittsburgh synagogue, should he be convicted on certain charges.

Zagorski was convicted in 1984 of first-degree pre-meditated murder for luring two men into a wooded area under the pretense of a marijuana deal, and then shooting them and slitting their throats.

In a legal battle that reached the U.S. Supreme Court, Zagorski sought to elude capital punishment based on the Eighth Amendment's ban on “cruel and unusual punishments.” Between ways of dying, though, he favored the electric chair over lethal injection, in a repudiation of a method seen by some as more humane and technologically advanced, despite a pattern of problems and concern from medical experts. The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is among major drug companies that have prohibited the use of their products in lethal injections.

“By signing this affidavit I am not conceding that electrocution is constitutional. I believe both lethal injection and electrocution violate my rights under the 8th amendment,” Zagorski wrote last month. “However, if I am not granted a stay of execution by the courts, as between two unconstitutional choices I choose electrocution.”

He reasoned that death at the end of a syringe could mean as long as 18 minutes in “utter terror and agony,” whereas the electric chair would quickly stop his heart.


This undated photo, released by the Tennessee Department of Corrections, shows death row inmate Edmund Zagorski in Tennessee. — Picture: Tennessee Department of Corrections.
This undated photo, released by the Tennessee Department of Corrections,
shows death row inmate Edmund Zagorski in Tennessee.
 — Picture: Tennessee Department of Corrections.


At first, the state rejected his request, saying it had come too late. After a federal judge put a hold on the execution, however, officials reversed course. The governor, Republican Bill Haslam, ordered a 10-day delay to prepare use of the electric chair. The state confirmed that it would carry out Zagorski's death sentence by electrocution, “based upon his waiver of his right to be executed by lethal injection,” as the warden of the prison wrote to the inmate's attorney last month.

However, his quest to assert a right not to be executed at all was unsuccessful. Again on Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review the case, after a majority of justices had decided last month not to thwart the execution. They gave no reasons for their determination, as is customary.

But Justice Sonia Sotomayor, a sharp critic of the death penalty, dissented. She observed of Zagorski's preference: “Given what most people think of the electric chair, it is hard to imagine a more striking testament — from a person with more at stake — to the legitimate fears raised by the lethal-injection drugs that Tennessee uses.”

Joined by Justice Stephen G. Breyer, she had also dissented from the court's October order. “Once again, a State hastens to kill a prisoner despite mounting evidence that the sedative to be used, midazolam,” she wrote, will induce feelings of “drowning, suffocating, and being burned alive from the inside out.” Midazolam, the powerful sedative introduced first in a three-drug protocol, has proved so forbidding that an Alabama death row inmate asked last year to be killed instead by firing squad.

Sotomayor argued: “Capital prisoners are not entitled to pleasant deaths under the Eighth Amendment, but they are entitled to humane deaths. The longer we stand silent amid growing evidence of inhumanity in execution methods like Tennessee's, the longer we extend our own complicity in state-sponsored brutality.”

Her reasoning stood in contrast to the judgment last month of the Tennessee Supreme Court, which decided 4-1 to turn back a challenge to lethal injection brought by 32 death row inmates, who said the drugs tortured them to death. The inmates did not prove that an alternative means was available, the majority found.

One of the plaintiffs was Zagorski. Legal filings indicate that within two hours of the state court's decision, he had informed the prison warden that he would prefer an alternative: the electric chair.

He spent 34 years on death row, becoming a “model inmate,” according to his attorney, Kelley Henry, a federal public defender. She said he had once saved the life of a guard. The last time he was on death watch, other inmates pooled their resources for a pizza dinner in his honor, according to the Tennessean.

On Thursday, his final meal was pickled pig knuckles and pig tails, the Tennessee Department of Correction said. Inmates in Tennessee are allotted $20 for a special meal before their execution. He ate at 4 p.m., three hours before he was sponged down with saltwater to better conduct electricity.

“Chin up,” he instructed his attorney in his final moments, telling her that he didn't want to gaze out and see her downcast expression.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4-C7IxijQA

She condemned his death as a miscarriage of justice, saying, “The world is not safer because of his execution.”

“Horrifically, Mr. Zagorski was forced to choose between 10 to 18 minutes of chemically burning from the inside while paralyzed or being literally burned to death in less than a minute,” she told reporters.

The irony of the case, said Bernard Harcourt, an expert in penal law and procedure at Columbia University, is that lethal injection, because it was billed as a method befitting more modern times, “muted our societal consideration of the unconscionability of the electric chair.”

Texas became the first state to use lethal injection to carry out capital punishment in 1982. Since then, more than 7 percent of lethal injections have been botched, said Austin Sarat, a professor at Amherst College and the author of Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty.

“Lethal injection was supposed to be the fulfillment of a century-long quest for a method of execution that could be safe, reliable, and humane,” he said in an interview. “But with each invention of a technology — electrocution replacing hanging, gas chamber coming on to complement electrocution, and then in late 1970s, the development of the lethal injection protocol — the same hopes were articulated.”

The prisoner's decision to revert to an older method of punishment, Sarat said, “signals what we know to be happening — the breakdown of this idea that lethal injection would be any kind of magic bullet.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Isaac Stanley-Becker is a reporter on The Washington Post's Morning Mix team, based in the U.K. He is completing a doctorate in modern European history at the University of Oxford, where he is a Rhodes Scholar.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: ‘Let's rock’: First Tennessee man executed by electric chair since 2007


https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2018/11/02/lets-rock-last-words-double-murderer-who-chose-electric-chair-over-lethal-injection



from The Press…

Person electrocuted in central Christchurch office building

By JONATHAN GUILDFORD and TOM KITCHIN | 6:37PM — Friday, 02 November 2018

The building where a person was electrocuted on Friday at 123 Victoria Street, Christchurch. — Photograph: John Kirk-Anderson.
The building where a person was electrocuted on Friday at 123 Victoria Street, Christchurch. — Photograph: John Kirk-Anderson.

A PERSON has been electrocuted at a workplace in a central Christchurch office building.

Emergency services were called to a sudden death at 123 Victoria Street after 11.20am on Friday.

A WorkSafe spokeswoman said it was understood a worker was electrocuted and died as a result.

WorkSafe has opened an investigation into the matter, she said.

The building is beside businesses such as Mexicanos, The Dirty Land and Saunders & Co.

Nexia​ Chartered Accountants are on the top floor of the building.

On the ground floor there are hospitality businesses such as Louis Champagne and Oyster Bar, Coffee Traders, Red Light District and Sister Kong.

Some of the building is vacant and still being fitted out, The Press understands.


Police investigate a sudden death at a workplace in a partly-vacant office building in Victoria Street, Christchurch, understood to be an electrocution. — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.
Police investigate a sudden death at a workplace in a partly-vacant office building in Victoria Street, Christchurch, understood to be an electrocution.
 — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.


Orion crews were called to 123 Victoria Street to help emergency services. — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.
Orion crews were called to 123 Victoria Street to help emergency services. — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.

An Orion vehicle sits outside the partly-vacant 123 Victoria Street, as police investigate an electrocution. The building where the incident happened next door to popular cocktail bar The Dirty Land. — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.
An Orion vehicle sits outside the partly-vacant 123 Victoria Street, as police investigate an electrocution. The building where the incident happened
next door to popular cocktail bar The Dirty Land. — Photograph: Joseph Johnson.


An Orion spokeswoman said crews were called to help emergency services at a “property in the central city”. She would not comment further.

A worker at a nearby business saw three police cars, two fire engines and an ambulance by the building.

She understood the whole building lost power after the incident. She did not know where the incident happened in the building.

Businesses at the address called by The Press declined to comment.

Countrywide Group director Richard Diver, of the company that owns the building, declined to comment.

A police spokeswoman said it was a WorkSafe investigation and it was not police's responsibility to establish the cause of death.


https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/108310360/person-dead-after-workplace-incident-in-central-christchurch

 99 
 on: November 03, 2018, 12:29:16 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 100 
 on: November 03, 2018, 12:03:27 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

The invaders have already infested America (and Australia and New Zealand).

They're the spawn of whitie boat-people who gatecrashed without first getting visas from the ethnic people already living there.

Hang on, isn't that what those Honduras people are doing? Exactly what whitie did before them?

So unless whitie are prepared to fuck-off back to the shitholes in Europe and Britain they came from, then they have no moral right to criticise others for likewise moving to thier country.

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