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 91 
 on: August 06, 2019, 11:41:57 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 92 
 on: August 06, 2019, 02:56:47 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 93 
 on: August 05, 2019, 11:25:01 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 94 
 on: August 05, 2019, 04:10:56 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

What perpetual war looks like in America

Now tragedy at Walmart is part of the iconography of our domestic war zones.

By PHILIP KENNICOTT | 2:54PM EDT — Sunday, August 04, 2019

Law enforcement respond to the mass shooting at an El Paso shopping center on August 3. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Law enforcement respond to the mass shooting at an El Paso shopping center on August 3. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

THE EYES of the Hooters owl stare at us, as if through large goggles, wide open with shock and horror. In front of the restaurant, men and women in military fatigues, some with helmets, others dressed more provisionally, hurry past, bearing a formidable arsenal of weapons and communications gear. This is what war looks in America, a surreal juxtaposition of familiar logos and brand names and a now all-too-familiar display of police response.

You might not even notice the ambulance in the right of the image because ambulances are now a bit like the Coca-Cola sign of yesteryear, an obligatory signifier of our country, instantly recognizable and ubiquitous. The ambulances in America will always be full because men with guns who spend too much time reading drivel on the Internet will never stop killing us.

For most of our history, wars have involved foreign ideologies and they took place on foreign soil. When we saw images of the war dead from Iraq or Afghanistan, they were surrounded by an architecture that seemed odd, often low-rise buildings made of dun-colored concrete. When a bomb blast tore a hole in the facade of a distant city, we stared into the gaping vacuity at disorderly domestic spaces that were strange and unrecognizable, full of clothes, appliances and shattered dishware that wasn't like the stuff you find at Walmart.

Now the war has come to Walmart. And Hooters. And Sam's Club and McDonald's, and an unnamed but homey looking restaurant that has a $7.99 Lunch Special. If this doesn't look like war, that's only because we so reflexively resist the idea of a war on American soil that we refuse to see the obvious.

Are these scattered and occasional attacks? Two of them, in El Paso and Dayton, have happened in less than 24 hours. Are they meaningless acts of criminal rage? In fact, many massacres, carried out with weapons of war, are motivated by a well-developed if incoherent ideology, with its own literature of interconnected manifestos, its own philosophy of politics and history, its own iconography of symbols, and an emerging pantheon for its murderous heroes and martyrs.

We tend to look at images of war and disaster with some part of the eye attuned as a tourist is attuned to small details of place. When terrorists took over a shopping mall in Nairobi in 2013, killing more than 60 civilians and wounding hundreds of others, the landscape felt first familiar — an upscale shopping complex — and then increasingly foreign. Motivated by fear, the mind found things to place the tragedy at a remove: The telephones poles were different, the stores and shops had strange names, the cars were smaller and splattered with a foreign hue of mud, and vines and greenery clung to the cinder block walls in a way that wasn't quite like home.

The eyes entered a landscape of blood and death, but the mind emerged with that strange, dehumanizing consolation: This all happened far away.

War photographers often seek to overcome the otherworldliness of war by focusing on the banal and familiar. The cigarette is a recurring motif of war photography not just because soldiers often smoke, but for the same reason that theater directors use cigarettes onstage: to make things more believable. Familiar props such as cigarettes and water bottles introduce a sense of the ordinary, making the extraordinary just a little bit more accessible.

In 2004, photographer Anja Niedringhaus photographed an American marine in Fullujah, Iraq. Strapped to his back was a G.I. Joe doll, with a military buzz cut and giant, plastic forearms. The doll, a common American plaything, stands in for the soldier himself, whose back is turned as he works his way through a landscape of pockmarked shops, rubble-strewn streets and thickets of electrical and telephone wires.

The gunman who took at least 20 lives in El Paso apparently wrote a statement of his thinking and intent, and it appears that he went to a shopping center because it was a soft target. While his screed is full of rage against heartless corporations and American consumerism, it is, above all, a Malthusian panic about the arrival and incorporation of immigrants into American life. His rage played out among the signs of the corporate menace he feared, in a landscape of consumerism. He explicitly decried the use of too many paper towels, and there in a shopping cart pushed by a woman fleeing the violence, is a plastic-wrapped, jumbo-size pack of Bounty Essentials.

This convergence of our commercial landscape with violence is what the 21st century — slow-motion but persistent American war — looks like. It also looks like the underside of a child's school desk, people hiding in closets and wailing into cellphones, SWAT teams in parking lots, nightclubs with overturned bar stools and tables, piles of shoes abandoned outside a bar, and movie theaters soaked in gore. If we have the courage to do what we must do and look at the facts, we will also see that in one essential way, the American war looks like every other war everywhere on the planet, full of bodies riddled with bullets, bloodied, broken and dead.

Some wars are over in a day, or a week, and others go on for years. If there are opportunists and profiteers and cynical actors who are willing to fuel the mayhem for a tiny bit of personal or political advantage, then they can go on for decades. If war takes root in a society slowly, or by stealth, it can come to seem the ordinary state of affairs.

And if you can't see it, if every image seems to be a dissonant, a one-time-only disruption of a generic landscape, then it can go on forever.

In 1945, the German photographer Richard Peter climbed the tower of Dresden's city hall and photographed the ruins of a once magnificent city. In the foreground of this decimated landscape, he placed one of the tower's sandstone statues that had, somehow, miraculously survived the Allied fire bombing. It is August Schreitmueller's “Allegory of Goodness”, one of 16 figures representing the essential virtues carved in the early 20th century, though in a style that suggests it had stood there for centuries. The statue seems to look down helplessly, with arms outstretched, at an endless sea of destruction below.

The destruction of Dresden would not have happened but for an ideology of hate that demonized the Other. The deaths in El Paso would not have happened but for an ideology of hate that demonized the Other. It is strange that it would be the Hooters owl that symbolizes the tragic absurdity of our society, unwilling to confront either the motives or the means of our now everyday mass murder.

The bird may not be an allegory of goodness, or mercy, love or prudence, but owls are wise, and this one has its eyes open.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Philip Kennicott is the Pulitzer Prize-winning art and architecture critic of The Washington Post. He has been on staff at The Post since 1999, first as classical music critic, then as culture critic. In 2011, he combined art and architecture into a beat that is focused on everything visual in the nation's capital. Kennicott was educated at Deep Springs College and holds a BA in Philosophy from Yale.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/what-perpetual-war-looks-like-in-america/2019/08/04/8f89c95a-b6da-11e9-a091-6a96e67d9cce_story.html

 95 
 on: August 04, 2019, 10:13:19 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

And yet another mass shooting in America today carried out by a WHITE TRASH RIGHTIE.

The latest is in Dayton, Ohio.

White-trash rightie Americans should be drowned at birth.

They are scum & Trump-supporting vermin who don't deserve to be allowed to share the planet with the rest of us.

 96 
 on: August 04, 2019, 09:58:37 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Focus on white supremacy

Authorities examine racist ideology as a source of domestic terrorism.

By SUHAUNA HUSSAIN | Saturday, August 03, 2019

A car driven by James Alex Fields Jr. plows into people protesting a far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017. Fields was sentenced to life in prison. — Photograph: Ryan M. Kelly/Daily Progress.
A car driven by James Alex Fields Jr. plows into people protesting a far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017. Fields was sentenced to life in prison.
 — Photograph: Ryan M. Kelly/Daily Progress.


WHEN a gunman killed three people and injured 15 others at the Gilroy Garlic Festival last weekend and died at the scene, authorities were left to discern a motive for his attack.

Evidence compiled after the shooting seemed to include some clues: Investigators recovered extremist materials during a search of 19-year-old gunman Santino William Legan's home in Nevada, according to one law enforcement source, and Legan had posted a photo on Instagram urging people to read a novel widely associated with white supremacists.

The Instagram comments fueled speculation that the crime was motivated by racist ideology. If that turns out to be true — authorities have said a motive remained undetermined — it could mean that the attack fell into the most common category of domestic terrorism: those associated with white supremacy.

John F. Bennett, special agent in charge of the FBI's San Francisco office, said at a news conference on Thursday that it was not clear that Legan was targeting any group in particular and that motive “can be a very tricky thing” to identify.

“It seems very random at this point,” he said of the attack, adding that authorities had not established the ideology, if any, behind it.

Federal and local authorities recently have said there are heightened concerns about domestic terrorism and white supremacy.

In July, FBI Director Christopher A. Wray told the Senate Judiciary Committee that a majority of domestic terrorism cases the bureau has investigated are motivated by white supremacy. Wray said that the FBI was aggressively pursuing domestic terrorism and hate crimes.

“Our focus is on the violence,” he said. “We, the FBI, don't investigate the ideology, no matter how repugnant. We investigate violence.”

Deadly mass shootings have prompted Congress to scrutinize how resources are allocated for investigating groups that post domestic terrorist threats.

Michael McGarrity, head of the FBI's counterterrorism unit, in May testified during a congressional hearing that the bureau was investigating about 850 cases of domestic terrorism.

Brian Levin, director of Cal State San Bernardino's Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism, said it can be difficult to classify attacks. For example, the gunman in the Parkland, Florida, shooting in February 2018 that killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School fixated on racist imagery, but authorities did not designate the attack as a hate crime, and Levin said his center did not include it in a recent report.

Levin said political polarization and a rise of far-right nationalism are contributing to hate crimes around the globe.

“We're seeing a coalescence of traditional hate crime with political violence,” he said.

Here are examples of attacks in recent years in the U.S. and elsewhere that authorities have linked to white supremacist ideology. The accounts were compiled from law enforcement and media reports.


Six people killed in shooting at a mosque in Quebec City, Canada.

On January 29, 2017, a gunman opened fired during evening prayers at an Islamic Cultural Center, killing six and injuring 19 — one paralyzed for life.

Alexandre Bissonnette, who pleaded guilty to the charges of first-degree murder, was associated with right-wing nationalist positions. He told police he was motivated by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's message welcoming refugees after the Trump administration's travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries.


Van rammed into people outside a mosque in London.

Attacker Darren Osborne drove a rented van into a crowd of Muslims standing outside a mosque in north London in June 2017. The group was gathered around victim Makram Ali, who had collapsed due to a previously existing health condition. Ali was killed and 12 others were injured.

The Crown Prosecution Service prosecuted the case as a terrorist offense because of a handwritten note found in the van used in the attack. The note referred to Muslims as “feral” and said Muslim men were “rapists” who were “preying on our children.” Osborne was sentenced to 43 years in prison.


Charlottesville car attack.

On August 12, 2017, James Alex Fields Jr., a participant in a far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, drove a car into a crowd of people demonstrating against the white nationalist rally, killing protester Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring dozens of others.

Fields was sentenced to life in prison on federal hate-crime charges.

Far-right groups had gathered in Charlottesville to protest the city's decision to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The rally turned violent with street brawls breaking out before the car-ramming attack.


Two shot in a supermarket in Kentucky after man attempts to enter a black church.

Gunman Gregory Bush unsuccessfully attempted to enter the First Baptist Church of Jeffersontown, Kentucky, a predominantly black church, before killing two people at a Kroger supermarket on October 24, 2018.

Louisville resident Ed Harrell told the Louisville Courier-Journal that as he crouched in the parking lot and grabbed his own revolver, the gunman walked past and said: “Don't shoot me. I won't shoot you. Whites don't shoot whites.”

Bush was indicted on hate-crime and firearm charges. He recently pleaded not guilty to two counts of murder, two counts of wanton endangerment and one count of attempted murder.


11 killed in shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.

Gunman Robert Bowers shouted anti-Semitic slurs as he opened fire inside a Pittsburgh synagogue on October 27, 2018, killing 11 and injuring six others, including four police officers.

For months before the attack, Bowers posted angrily on social media, calling immigrants “invaders” and said Jews were the “enemy of white people.”

Bowers was charged with 29 criminal counts, including obstructing the free exercise of religious beliefs (a hate crime) and using a firearm to commit murder. Bowers pleaded not guilty in February and pretrial motions are scheduled for August 15.


51 killed at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Brenton Tarrant, who espoused white nationalist ideology, went on a shooting rampage at two mosques in Christchurch in March, killing 51 people and injuring dozens of others.

Tarrant live-streamed the shooting and left a 74-page manifesto in which he detailed how he grew to hate immigrants and specifically Muslims, and aimed to kill them and encourage others to do the same.

Tarrant was charged with the murder of 51 people, 40 counts of attempted murder and one terrorism charge.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Suhauna Hussain is a reporter at the Los Angeles Times. Before joining the L.A. Times in 2018, she wrote for the Tampa Bay Times, the Center for Public Integrity, the East Bay Express, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and independent student-run newspaper, the Daily Californian. Hussain was raised in Los Angeles and graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in political economy.

https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=3aaa74bb-1110-41b3-b6d3-454b935a4dfd

 97 
 on: August 04, 2019, 08:51:47 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 98 
 on: August 04, 2019, 08:37:14 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



(definitely worth clicking-on, then scroll-down and start reading)

 99 
 on: August 04, 2019, 06:20:07 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Europe's flight-shame movement has travelers taking trains to save the planet

Young Europeans are digging out their parents' yellowing Europe-by-rail guidebooks.

By MICHAEL BIRNHAUM | 3:41PM EDT — Friday, August 02, 2019

Johan Hilm traveled from Stockholm to Austria in a 30-hour trip by train, bus and ferry. — Photograph: Darian Woehr/The Washington Post.
Johan Hilm traveled from Stockholm to Austria in a 30-hour trip by train, bus and ferry. — Photograph: Darian Woehr/The Washington Post.

STOCKHOLM — If he had hopped on a plane, Johan Hilm would have gotten from Sweden to Austria in two hours.

Instead, the lanky Swede made an epic overland journey by rail, bus and ferry that took more than 30 hours.

He joined a growing crowd of Europeans who are spurning air travel out of concern for the environment this summer.

Budget airlines such as Ireland's Ryanair and British easyJet revolutionized European travel two decades ago, when they first started offering to scoot people across the continent for as little as $20 a flight. That mode of travel, once celebrated as an opening of the world, is now being recognized for its contribution to global problems.

Tourists have been spooked by the realization that one passenger's share of the exhaust from a single flight can cancel out a year's worth of Earth-friendly efforts. And so they are digging out their parents' yellowing Europe-by-rail guidebooks and trading tips on the most convenient night train to Vienna.

Mark Smith, founder of Seat 61, a popular website dedicated to train-based travel around Europe and beyond, said he has noticed a change in the people coming to his site. When he set it up in 2001, users told him they loved trains, or were scared of flying, or couldn't fly.

“Now, when people tell me why they are taking the train, they say two things in the same breath: They say they are fed up with the stress of flying, and they want to cut their carbon footprint,” Smith said.

So far, the biggest shift has been in green-conscious Sweden, where airline executives blame increased train travel — up one-third this summer compared with a year ago — for a drop in air passenger traffic.


In Sweden, flygskam, or “flight shame,” has encouraged some travelers to switch to trains. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
In Sweden, flygskam, or “flight shame,” has encouraged some travelers to switch to trains. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Hilm reduced his carbon emissions by 80 percent by taking trains, a bus and a ferry instead of a plane. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Hilm reduced his carbon emissions by 80 percent by taking trains, a bus and a ferry instead of a plane. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Swedish leaders this month announced they would inject new cash into the national rail company. They plan to build up a new fleet of trains after years of cutbacks when cheap plane tickets were luring people into the skies.

The newly coined concept of flygskam, or “flight shame”, has turned some Swedes bashful about their globe-trotting. A guerrilla campaign used Instagram to tally the planet-busting travels of top Swedish celebrities. Next door in Norway, meanwhile, the prime minister felt the need to assure citizens that they need not apologize for flying to see family in the high north.

Hilm, 31, a health-care consultant who was on his way to hike across Austria for eight days, said he tried to live an environmentally responsible life. “I don't drive a car. I eat mostly vegetarian. I live in an apartment, not a big house.”

He was stunned when he assessed the impact of his flights. “I did one of those calculators you can do online,” he said, “and 80 percent of my emissions were from travel.”

“I don't want to say I'll never fly again, but I do want to be conscious about the decisions I make,” Hilm added over coffee in the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train's bistro car. Little kids bounced on the squishy red banquette seats nearby. In the passenger compartments, some people dozed, others played card games. Out the window, cows looked up from their fields as the train hurtled through at 120 mph.

Environmentally friendly travel can require a time investment. To get to Austria, Hilm took a 5½-hour train trip to Copenhagen, a 1¾-hour bus to the Danish coast, a 45-minute ferry to Germany, a 90-minute train to Hamburg, an 11-hour night train to southern Germany and a final three-hour train.

He left his Stockholm apartment before 6 a.m. on a Wednesday. He arrived at his Alpine destination after noon the next day.

What was it worth? Measuring carbon dioxide emissions from travel can be an inexact science. One popular online calculator suggested that Hilm's trip would have led to about 577 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions if he had flown, compared with 118 pounds by rail, a savings of 80 percent.


The Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train speeds past fields and forests. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train speeds past fields and forests. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Train attendant Iris Grundström tidies the bistro car of the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Train attendant Iris Grundström tidies the bistro car of the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

In the first six months of 2019, air passenger traffic was down 3.8 percent in Sweden compared with the previous year. Climate concerns are among several reasons for the downturn, said Jean-Marie Skoglund, an aviation expert at the Swedish Transport Agency. He said a slowing economy, tax changes and an airline bankruptcy were other factors.

Across Europe, air travel still ticked up — by 4.4 percent — in the first quarter of 2019, according to figures from Airports Council International Europe, an industry group. But for young, green Europeans, saying no to flying is becoming a thing.

The shift has been inspired in part by Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate campaigner who sparked a worldwide school strike and has been crisscrossing Europe by train as she pressures politicians to do more about the environment. Thunberg has not been on a plane since 2015. This week, she said she would soon travel to the United States — by sailboat.

Record heat this summer and last has also focused attention on climate change and influenced travel plans. Hilm set out on his trip during a heat wave that brought all-time high temperatures to Paris, Britain, Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

“If you want to reduce your environmental impact, the best thing you can do is to stop flying,” said Susanna Elfors, founder of a Facebook group called Tagsemester, or Train Vacation, that has been credited with helping to spur train travel. Users exchange practical tips and cheer on each other's journeys. The Swedish-language group now has 99,000 members — which could mean that 1 percent of Sweden's 10 million people are using it.

The aviation sector generates about 2.5 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions — meaning it's only a small fraction of the problem. A European Union list released in April ranked Ryanair among Europe's top 10 carbon emitters, grouping the airline with companies that operate coal-fired power plants. “Passengers travelling on Ryanair have the lowest CO² emissions per kilometer traveled than any other airline,” the company responded in a statement.

European leaders are beginning to reconsider how much they should encourage plane travel. Jet fuel is currently untaxed in the E.U., unlike in the United States. France this month announced it would introduce an eco-tax on flights originating at French airports, with the money to be reinvested in rail networks and other environmentally friendly transport. Several other European countries have imposed or increased flight taxes. The Dutch government is lobbying for an E.U.-wide tax on aviation.

Even some airlines have gotten in on the “fly less” message.

“Think about flying responsibly,” Dutch airline KLM said in an advertisement unveiled this month. Unusually, it suggested considering a different form of transportation: “Could you take the train instead?”


The view from a train traveling between Malmö, Sweden, and Copenhagen. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The view from a train traveling between Malmö, Sweden, and Copenhagen. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Linnea Rothin, 23, and Marcus Nygren, 27, at Copenhagen Central Station. They have been traveling by train because of environmental concerns. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Linnea Rothin, 23, and Marcus Nygren, 27, at Copenhagen Central Station. They have been traveling by train because of environmental concerns.
 — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.


Airlines say they are taking steps to be greener. SAS, the largest airline in Scandinavia, is ending in-flight duty-free sales and asking passengers to pre-book meals so planes can be lighter and more fuel-efficient. Pilots have been urged to taxi on the ground with only one engine switched on.

Anxiety about climate change is “playing a part, for sure,” in Sweden's dropping air passenger traffic, said SAS chief executive Rickard Gustafson. He said the airline was pushing to expand its use of renewable fuels as quickly as possible.

He said, however, the world needs air travel.

“The society that we all enjoy, the wealth and the social security that we all have — without aviation, it would all collapse,” he said.

To be sure, there are limits to train travel. It can be time-consuming, and the transit is not always painless. Travelers on the Swedish Facebook group complain of trains without air conditioning that turn into saunas and delays that cause missed connections.

Marcus Nygren and Linnea Rothin, a Swedish couple who just returned from a three-week rail trip around central Europe, said on one stretch, they were crammed into a night train compartment with a woman who spoke neither the local language nor anything they could speak, and who was traveling with a vast assortment of baggage, including what appeared to be a sewing machine.

They also saw train travel as liberating.

“I've dreamed about going to an airport, looking at the board and saying, ‘Okay, I want to go there’. And that's pretty much what we've done,” only by rail, said Nygren, 27.

They bought Pan-European Inter-rail passes and set out with only a first destination in mind. Then they improvised their way from the Czech Republic to Hungary to Austria to Croatia to Slovenia to Germany. It was the first time either had traveled that way.

“Before, it would be, like, ‘Okay, I'm traveling to Italy’,” Rothin, 23, said. By rail and on the ground, she said, “you can kind of understand the way the countries influence each other,” as one culture shades into another.


Nygren and Rothin play the game “Hive” on their return train to Sweden. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Nygren and Rothin play the game “Hive” on their return train to Sweden. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

The view from a Copenhagen-to-Stockholm train. Some travelers say taking trains has given them a new understanding of Europe. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The view from a Copenhagen-to-Stockholm train. Some travelers say taking trains has given them a new understanding of Europe.
 — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.


Climate change experts caution that meaningful shifts will need to happen on a structural level that goes beyond any individual's private actions.

“In terms of personal climate activism broadly, whether you're talking about aviation, reducing the amount of meat you eat, consumption choices, the answer is always: It is important, but it is insufficient,” said Greg Carlock, a manager at the World Resources Institute, a Washington think tank.

Rail travelers say they simply want to lead climate-friendlier lives — and that they are delighted they already seem to have spurred a move to invest more in the Swedish rail system.

“You can do a lot of things on your own, but you also have to understand it's part of the ecosystem,” Rothin said.


__________________________________________________________________________

Karla Adam in London contributed to this report.

Michael Birnbaum is the Brussels bureau chief for The Washington Post. He previously served as the bureau chief in Moscow and in Berlin, and was an education reporter. He has covered the conflict in Ukraine, the Egyptian revolution, the fall of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi and the Arab Spring elsewhere in the Middle East. He has also worked at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Birnbaum has a degree in German history from Yale University. He grew up in Chicago.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO:‘Flight shame’: How avoiding planes might save the planet

 • Europe's ‘flight shame’ movement doesn’t stand a chance in the U.S.

 • Should short-haul flights be banned? Climate change is a major issue in elections in Europe and Australia.

 • France moves to combat climate change by making flights more expensive

 • An Airline That Doesn't Want You to Fly. That’s New

 • Listen on Post Reports: By The Way reporter Hannah Sampson on the airline asking its passengers not to fly

 • Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg addressed French lawmakers. Right-wingers boycotted and mocked her.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/europes-flight-shame-movement-has-travelers-taking-trains-to-save-the-planet/2019/08/02/1bd38486-ac96-11e9-9411-a608f9d0c2d3_story.html

 100 
 on: August 04, 2019, 03:10:43 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



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