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 81 
 on: December 07, 2019, 07:34:04 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Trump is a stupid “fake president buffoon.

That's why the worlds REAL presidents and leaders are laughing at him.

 82 
 on: December 07, 2019, 03:04:48 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
Trump good guy surrounded by sell-out scum

Moron Echo Chamber Xi loving fools

yes we need these adult Xi woke people ruling the world

so they can kill all their idiot followers like they do in China
 
China Has Mobile Execution Vans



http://www.chinauncensored.tv/execution-vans/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jV4-wuLzSDM

https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=997_1486501840

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=55&v=0whb5vdtmbU&feature=emb_logo

DEATH TO CHINA DEATH TO ALL COMMUNIST TRASH

 83 
 on: December 06, 2019, 09:22:06 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Hahaha … America's “FAKE PRESIDENT” is clearly waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay out of his depth when he has to mix it with real leaders and adults.

No wonder he loses the plot and storms off in a huge huff.

 84 
 on: December 06, 2019, 09:21:03 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Unruly, pouty and boastful: A field guide for Trump's journeys abroad

His abrupt departure from this week's NATO summit was typical for a president
who has routinely upended foreign visits during his first three years in office.


By ASHLEY PARKER, PHILIP RUCKER and MICHAEL BIRNBAUM | 9:15PM EST — Thursday, December 05, 2019

President Donald J. Trump meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House during the NATO summit Tuesday in London. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House during the NATO summit Tuesday in London.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


WATFORD, ENGLAND — President Trump often ends his foreign jaunts with a grand flourish: a solo news conference where he plays the flamboyant diplomat, riffing on the trip, establishing dominance — and, most important, offering his final version of reality before blowing out of town.

That Trump slunk out of the NATO summit here on Wednesday after hastily canceling his planned news conference underscored just how unsettling he found his two-day visit.

French President Emmanuel Macron had confronted Trump on areas of disagreement, and a video surfaced of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau privately mocking the American president in a huddle with Macron and other world leaders during a Buckingham Palace reception.

But in many respects, Trump's abrupt departure was typical for a president who has routinely upended foreign visits during his first three years in office — blustering, bullying and attempting at all times to keep the world's attention squarely on himself.

He has criticized his hosts and issued global threats. He's hobnobbed with dictators and feuded with allies.

And, as he did this week in Watford, he has sometimes sulked when things aren’t going his way — part of the compendium of behaviors that make up Trump's overseas adventures as president.


The unruly guest

THE last time Trump visited London, in June, he caused a ruckus by declaring that privatizing Britain's National Health Service — a sacrosanct postwar creation that provides free health care to Britons — would be “on the table” for trade discussions.

The faux pas quickly became a talking point among British politicians hoping to succeed then-Prime Minister Theresa May. And Trump backtracked shortly thereafter.

“I don't see it being on the table,” Trump said, contradicting his own comments. “That's something I would not consider part of trade. That's not trade.”

And on Tuesday, when asked again if he thought Britain's health system should be part of trade negotiations with the United States, Trump acted like his previous comments didn't exist: “I don't even know where that rumor started.”

“If you handed it to us on a silver platter, we want nothing to do with it,” he concluded.

Trump has made similar reversals on other ventures abroad. Attending the Group of Seven summit in August in Biarritz, France, Trump seesawed over his trade war with China. First, via Twitter, he “hereby ordered” American companies out of China. Then he conceded he had “second thoughts” about the tariffs he had levied on Chinese products.

And then, only a few hours later — amid news coverage that he had backtracked and was softening his stance on China, two things he is loath to be seen as doing — he said his only second thought was not making the tariffs higher.

The presidential whipsaw triggered gyrations in stock markets and led allies to doubt the stability of American leadership.


President Donald J. Trump talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada during a NATO plenary session Wednesday in Watford, England. — Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada during a NATO plenary session Wednesday in Watford, England.
 — Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters.


In Britain this week, Trump managed to contradict himself again — in almost the same breath.

Asked about the video of Trudeau laughing about him behind his back, Trump criticized, then praised the Canadian leader in rapid succession.

“Well, he's two-faced,” Trump told reporters on Wednesday. “And honestly, with Trudeau, he's a nice guy. I find him to be a very nice guy.”

Later in the day, Trump was caught on an open microphone bragging about his Trudeau put-down, remarking to another summit attendee, “That was funny when I said that guy was two-faced.”


The rule-breaker

THE unofficial rule of overseas travel is that domestic politicking is supposed to stop at the water's edge. But this week in Britain — as he has done so many times previously — Trump behaved as if he were at one of his campaign rallies rather than a statesman abroad, trashing his rivals on foreign soil.

As he and Trudeau sat in gold-colored armchairs for a bilateral meeting on trade and other weighty matters, Trump lit into one of his domestic adversaries, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (Democrat-California), who has been leading the impeachment inquiry.

“I think he's a maniac,” Trump said in response to a reporter's question, as Trudeau looked on. “I think Adam Schiff is a deranged human being. I think he grew up with a complex for lots of reasons that are obvious. I think he's a very sick man. And he lies.”

In a meeting earlier that day with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Trump described congressional Democrats as “very unpatriotic” because they were investigating his conduct. “They are hurting our country very badly,” Trump said.


President Donald J. Trump attends a ceremony Wednesday at the summit of NATO leaders in Watford, England. — Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump attends a ceremony Wednesday at the summit of NATO leaders in Watford, England.
 — Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters.


Trump has used other foreign backdrops to trash his U.S. political opposition. Perhaps most striking was during his June trip to Normandy for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, where the president sat for an interview with Fox News's Laura Ingraham and — as white grave markers stretched behind him to the horizon — slammed his domestic rivals.

Trump called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Democrat-California) “a nasty, vindictive, horrible person” and, against the austere backdrop of the cemetery, weighed in on a host of other political issues.

The president's violations of protocol have been legion. When Trump traveled to London in July 2018, he opened his trip by trashing his host in an interview with The Sun, a British newspaper. The president said May had screwed up Brexit negotiations by allowing European Union leaders to hold “all the cards.”

Trump's blunt comments ricocheted across Britain and diminished and embarrassed May, whose domestic political standing already was weak. Trump later apologized for his diatribe and the two leaders appeared side-by-side at Chequers, the prime minister's country house, where the American president told the British prime minister, “Whatever you do is okay with me.”

During this week's trip — after the mocking video emerged — Trump kept British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Stoltenberg waiting for six minutes before finally emerging onstage on Wednesday for a ceremonial handshake.

As the two leaders waited, they paced, peered backstage and, at one point, consulted with Stoltenberg's pocket schedule. Johnson appeared perturbed, gesturing to a bank of cameras and noting, “We're live now.”

“How are we doing? Come on!” Johnson said.

Finally, Trump strode onstage, and the three men shook hands and posed for a photo before Trump tried to exit in the wrong direction.


The alpha diplomat

THE most acrimonious of Trump's meetings here was with Macron — and from the moment the two men clasped hands in one of the forceful, extended handshakes for which they have now become known, both presidents used their physicality to try to assert dominance.

As Trump spoke, Macron spread his legs wide — a stance known as “man-spreading” — and casually leaned forward in his armchair. As Macron spoke, Trump steepled his fingers, peered around the room and made eye contact with reporters, as if to convey indifference.

Such physicality is hardly new to Trump. At his first NATO meeting, in Brussels in 2017, Trump shoved the prime minister of Montenegro to get ahead of him in line when the allies gathered for a group photo.

Montenegro's leader dismissed Trump's brush-past as “inoffensive,” but the physical slight was particularly symbolic in the small Balkan nation, whose leader was attending his first NATO summit after a nearly decade-long quest to join the alliance.


German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders deliberate with President Donald J. Trump on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit on June 9, 2018, in Charlevoix, Quebec. — Photograph: German Government Press Office/Getty Images.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders deliberate with President Donald J. Trump on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit
on June 9, 2018, in Charlevoix, Quebec. — Photograph: German Government Press Office/Getty Images.


At the 2018 G-7 meeting in Canada, Trump grew frustrated as he sat at a table, other leaders hovering over him amid tense trade talks. He crossed his arms in defiance — a moment captured in a photograph released by the German government that went viral, a modern-day Renaissance painting for the Trump era.

Trump then reportedly stood up, reached into his suit jacket and tossed two Starburst candies onto the table.

“Here, Angela,” the president said, referring to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, a global risk consultancy. “Don't say I never give you anything.”


The strongman's friend

NATO leaders were gathered for their three-hour plenary session on Wednesday in Watford when, suddenly, Trump and Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan ducked out and retreated for a private tête-à-tête.

The president left a gathering of Western allies for an exclusive, half-hour audience with the most authoritarian leader in attendance — a man accused of eroding democratic norms at home. Some NATO diplomats were surprised that Trump would shirk the main event to hang out with a strongman.

A White House spokesman declined to say whether Trump confronted Erdogan over Turkey's recent displacement and slaughter of Kurds.

“Of course it strikes everyone how much the two connect,” said one senior NATO diplomat, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss the closed-door meeting. “Even physically, Erdogan would put his arm around his shoulders.”


President Donald J. Trump meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday during the NATO summit in London. — Photograph: Murat Cetinmuhurdar/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday during the NATO summit in London.
 — Photograph: Murat Cetinmuhurdar/Reuters.


During meetings abroad with allies, Trump frequently finds himself seemingly aligned with dictators, despots and authoritarian-minded leaders.

Ahead of the Group of Seven summit in August, Trump offered reassurances to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who had been worried the G-7 allies would gang up on him over criticism of his handling of massive fires that had been raging across the Amazon rainforest.

“Absolutely, we will be a voice for Brazil,” Trump told Bolsonaro, a far-right leader whose presidency has been polarizing at home.

The first time Trump met Russian President Vladimir Putin, at the 2017 Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, he attempted to conceal what he and Putin discussed by confiscating the notes of the official U.S. interpreter.

Later on the same trip, Trump huddled with Putin at length during a ceremonial leaders' dinner. He had no note-taker or other U.S. official present and relied only on Putin's interpreter to understand the Russian president.

And at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, this past June, Trump heaped praise on Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, describing as “a friend of mine” the leader who U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded ordered the gruesome murder and dismemberment of Washington Post contributing columnist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018.

Trump's embrace in Osaka helped salvage the global reputation of Mohammed, preventing the crown prince from becoming a global pariah and ensuring that Saudi Arabia would remain a hub for investment.

“I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you,” Trump told Mohammed. “You've done, really, a spectacular job.”


The pouting traveler

AS Trump retreated prematurely on Wednesday to Air Force One — saying he was abruptly canceling his wrap-up news conference because he'd already fielded so many questions from reporters the day prior — he was caught on an open microphone mocking the criticism he expected to receive.

‘He didn't do a press conference! He didn't do a press conference!’” Trump exclaimed, mimicking imagined punditry.

It was not the first time, however, that Trump had departed on a petulant note.

At the July 2018 NATO summit in Brussels, the president interrupted a wrap-up session about Ukraine to threaten to change America's commitment to the alliance if other countries did not ante up more money for defense on the spot. Trump had been fuming that morning because he did not think the media had adequately captured his anger with Germany and other nations over their levels of defense spending.

Trump's move, which many allies interpreted as signaling the possible withdrawal of the United States from NATO, triggered an emergency confab.

Afterward, many leaders looked drained, as though they had passed through a physical ordeal.

That's how some of them had felt a month earlier when Trump stormed out of a G-7 summit in Quebec by retracting U.S. support for the joint communique that already had been agreed to in an effort to demonstrate unity among the allies.

Aboard Air Force One en route to his next stop — Singapore, for a historic summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un — Trump lashed out at the G-7's host on Twitter. He called Trudeau “meek and mild” and “very dishonest & weak” after the Canadian prime minister spoke out against the tariffs Trump had imposed against some Canadian imports.


An image from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, left, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, center, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, and the back of French President Emmanuel Macron as the leaders were caught laughing about President Trump's lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on Tuesday in London. — Photograph: NATO TV/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
An image from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, left, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, center, British Prime Minister
Boris Johnson, right, and the back of French President Emmanuel Macron as the leaders were caught laughing about President Trump's
lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on Tuesday in London. — Photograph: NATO TV/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


It was, of course, not the last time Trudeau would find himself in Trump's crosshairs. After all, the video of Trudeau and other leaders mocking the president prompted Trump's “two-faced” dig — and may well have influenced his hasty departure from Watford.

By Thursday morning — after returning to Washington D.C. with no major agreements in hand — Trump was crowing about the trip as a great success.

“Tremendous things achieved for U.S. on my NATO trip,” Trump tweeted. “Proudly for our Country, no President has ever achieved so much in so little time.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. Rucker also is a Political Analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

Michael Birnbaum is the Brussels bureau chief for The Washington Post. He previously served as the bureau chief in Moscow and in Berlin, and was an education reporter. He has covered the conflict in Ukraine, the Egyptian revolution, the fall of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi and the Arab Spring elsewhere in the Middle East. He has also worked at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Birnbaum has a degree in German history from Yale University. He grew up in Chicago.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/unruly-pouty-and-boastful-a-field-guide-for-trumps-journeys-abroad/2019/12/05/45dce878-1751-11ea-bf81-ebe89f477d1e_story.html

 85 
 on: December 06, 2019, 08:20:23 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

This is what happens when you allow a stupid oaf who happens to be a “fake president” to mix with REAL presidents and world leaders…



from The Washington Post…

Unruly, pouty and boastful: A field guide for Trump's journeys abroad

His abrupt departure from this week's NATO summit was typical for a president
who has routinely upended foreign visits during his first three years in office.


By ASHLEY PARKER, PHILIP RUCKER and MICHAEL BIRNBAUM | 9:15PM EST — Thursday, December 05, 2019

President Donald J. Trump meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House during the NATO summit Tuesday in London. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump meets French President Emmanuel Macron at Winfield House during the NATO summit Tuesday in London.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


WATFORD, ENGLAND — President Trump often ends his foreign jaunts with a grand flourish: a solo news conference where he plays the flamboyant diplomat, riffing on the trip, establishing dominance — and, most important, offering his final version of reality before blowing out of town.

That Trump slunk out of the NATO summit here on Wednesday after hastily canceling his planned news conference underscored just how unsettling he found his two-day visit.

French President Emmanuel Macron had confronted Trump on areas of disagreement, and a video surfaced of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau privately mocking the American president in a huddle with Macron and other world leaders during a Buckingham Palace reception.

But in many respects, Trump's abrupt departure was typical for a president who has routinely upended foreign visits during his first three years in office — blustering, bullying and attempting at all times to keep the world's attention squarely on himself.

He has criticized his hosts and issued global threats. He's hobnobbed with dictators and feuded with allies.

And, as he did this week in Watford, he has sometimes sulked when things aren’t going his way — part of the compendium of behaviors that make up Trump's overseas adventures as president.


The unruly guest

THE last time Trump visited London, in June, he caused a ruckus by declaring that privatizing Britain's National Health Service — a sacrosanct postwar creation that provides free health care to Britons — would be “on the table” for trade discussions.

The faux pas quickly became a talking point among British politicians hoping to succeed then-Prime Minister Theresa May. And Trump backtracked shortly thereafter.

“I don't see it being on the table,” Trump said, contradicting his own comments. “That's something I would not consider part of trade. That's not trade.”

And on Tuesday, when asked again if he thought Britain's health system should be part of trade negotiations with the United States, Trump acted like his previous comments didn't exist: “I don't even know where that rumor started.”

“If you handed it to us on a silver platter, we want nothing to do with it,” he concluded.

Trump has made similar reversals on other ventures abroad. Attending the Group of Seven summit in August in Biarritz, France, Trump seesawed over his trade war with China. First, via Twitter, he “hereby ordered” American companies out of China. Then he conceded he had “second thoughts” about the tariffs he had levied on Chinese products.

And then, only a few hours later — amid news coverage that he had backtracked and was softening his stance on China, two things he is loath to be seen as doing — he said his only second thought was not making the tariffs higher.

The presidential whipsaw triggered gyrations in stock markets and led allies to doubt the stability of American leadership.


President Donald J. Trump talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada during a NATO plenary session Wednesday in Watford, England. — Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump talks with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada during a NATO plenary session Wednesday in Watford, England.
 — Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters.


In Britain this week, Trump managed to contradict himself again — in almost the same breath.

Asked about the video of Trudeau laughing about him behind his back, Trump criticized, then praised the Canadian leader in rapid succession.

“Well, he's two-faced,” Trump told reporters on Wednesday. “And honestly, with Trudeau, he's a nice guy. I find him to be a very nice guy.”

Later in the day, Trump was caught on an open microphone bragging about his Trudeau put-down, remarking to another summit attendee, “That was funny when I said that guy was two-faced.”


The rule-breaker

THE unofficial rule of overseas travel is that domestic politicking is supposed to stop at the water's edge. But this week in Britain — as he has done so many times previously — Trump behaved as if he were at one of his campaign rallies rather than a statesman abroad, trashing his rivals on foreign soil.

As he and Trudeau sat in gold-colored armchairs for a bilateral meeting on trade and other weighty matters, Trump lit into one of his domestic adversaries, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (Democrat-California), who has been leading the impeachment inquiry.

“I think he's a maniac,” Trump said in response to a reporter's question, as Trudeau looked on. “I think Adam Schiff is a deranged human being. I think he grew up with a complex for lots of reasons that are obvious. I think he's a very sick man. And he lies.”

In a meeting earlier that day with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Trump described congressional Democrats as “very unpatriotic” because they were investigating his conduct. “They are hurting our country very badly,” Trump said.


President Donald J. Trump attends a ceremony Wednesday at the summit of NATO leaders in Watford, England. — Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump attends a ceremony Wednesday at the summit of NATO leaders in Watford, England.
 — Photograph: Christian Hartmann/Reuters.


Trump has used other foreign backdrops to trash his U.S. political opposition. Perhaps most striking was during his June trip to Normandy for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, where the president sat for an interview with Fox News's Laura Ingraham and — as white grave markers stretched behind him to the horizon — slammed his domestic rivals.

Trump called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Democrat-California) “a nasty, vindictive, horrible person” and, against the austere backdrop of the cemetery, weighed in on a host of other political issues.

The president's violations of protocol have been legion. When Trump traveled to London in July 2018, he opened his trip by trashing his host in an interview with The Sun, a British newspaper. The president said May had screwed up Brexit negotiations by allowing European Union leaders to hold “all the cards.”

Trump's blunt comments ricocheted across Britain and diminished and embarrassed May, whose domestic political standing already was weak. Trump later apologized for his diatribe and the two leaders appeared side-by-side at Chequers, the prime minister's country house, where the American president told the British prime minister, “Whatever you do is okay with me.”

During this week's trip — after the mocking video emerged — Trump kept British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Stoltenberg waiting for six minutes before finally emerging onstage on Wednesday for a ceremonial handshake.

As the two leaders waited, they paced, peered backstage and, at one point, consulted with Stoltenberg's pocket schedule. Johnson appeared perturbed, gesturing to a bank of cameras and noting, “We're live now.”

“How are we doing? Come on!” Johnson said.

Finally, Trump strode onstage, and the three men shook hands and posed for a photo before Trump tried to exit in the wrong direction.


The alpha diplomat

THE most acrimonious of Trump's meetings here was with Macron — and from the moment the two men clasped hands in one of the forceful, extended handshakes for which they have now become known, both presidents used their physicality to try to assert dominance.

As Trump spoke, Macron spread his legs wide — a stance known as “man-spreading” — and casually leaned forward in his armchair. As Macron spoke, Trump steepled his fingers, peered around the room and made eye contact with reporters, as if to convey indifference.

Such physicality is hardly new to Trump. At his first NATO meeting, in Brussels in 2017, Trump shoved the prime minister of Montenegro to get ahead of him in line when the allies gathered for a group photo.

Montenegro's leader dismissed Trump's brush-past as “inoffensive,” but the physical slight was particularly symbolic in the small Balkan nation, whose leader was attending his first NATO summit after a nearly decade-long quest to join the alliance.


German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders deliberate with President Donald J. Trump on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit on June 9, 2018, in Charlevoix, Quebec. — Photograph: German Government Press Office/Getty Images.
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders deliberate with President Donald J. Trump on the sidelines of the Group of Seven summit
on June 9, 2018, in Charlevoix, Quebec. — Photograph: German Government Press Office/Getty Images.


At the 2018 G-7 meeting in Canada, Trump grew frustrated as he sat at a table, other leaders hovering over him amid tense trade talks. He crossed his arms in defiance — a moment captured in a photograph released by the German government that went viral, a modern-day Renaissance painting for the Trump era.

Trump then reportedly stood up, reached into his suit jacket and tossed two Starburst candies onto the table.

“Here, Angela,” the president said, referring to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group, a global risk consultancy. “Don't say I never give you anything.”


The strongman's friend

NATO leaders were gathered for their three-hour plenary session on Wednesday in Watford when, suddenly, Trump and Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan ducked out and retreated for a private tête-à-tête.

The president left a gathering of Western allies for an exclusive, half-hour audience with the most authoritarian leader in attendance — a man accused of eroding democratic norms at home. Some NATO diplomats were surprised that Trump would shirk the main event to hang out with a strongman.

A White House spokesman declined to say whether Trump confronted Erdogan over Turkey's recent displacement and slaughter of Kurds.

“Of course it strikes everyone how much the two connect,” said one senior NATO diplomat, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss the closed-door meeting. “Even physically, Erdogan would put his arm around his shoulders.”


President Donald J. Trump meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday during the NATO summit in London. — Photograph: Murat Cetinmuhurdar/Reuters.
President Donald J. Trump meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday during the NATO summit in London.
 — Photograph: Murat Cetinmuhurdar/Reuters.


During meetings abroad with allies, Trump frequently finds himself seemingly aligned with dictators, despots and authoritarian-minded leaders.

Ahead of the Group of Seven summit in August, Trump offered reassurances to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who had been worried the G-7 allies would gang up on him over criticism of his handling of massive fires that had been raging across the Amazon rainforest.

“Absolutely, we will be a voice for Brazil,” Trump told Bolsonaro, a far-right leader whose presidency has been polarizing at home.

The first time Trump met Russian President Vladimir Putin, at the 2017 Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, he attempted to conceal what he and Putin discussed by confiscating the notes of the official U.S. interpreter.

Later on the same trip, Trump huddled with Putin at length during a ceremonial leaders' dinner. He had no note-taker or other U.S. official present and relied only on Putin's interpreter to understand the Russian president.

And at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, this past June, Trump heaped praise on Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, describing as “a friend of mine” the leader who U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded ordered the gruesome murder and dismemberment of Washington Post contributing columnist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018.

Trump's embrace in Osaka helped salvage the global reputation of Mohammed, preventing the crown prince from becoming a global pariah and ensuring that Saudi Arabia would remain a hub for investment.

“I want to just thank you on behalf of a lot of people, and I want to congratulate you,” Trump told Mohammed. “You've done, really, a spectacular job.”


The pouting traveler

AS Trump retreated prematurely on Wednesday to Air Force One — saying he was abruptly canceling his wrap-up news conference because he'd already fielded so many questions from reporters the day prior — he was caught on an open microphone mocking the criticism he expected to receive.

‘He didn't do a press conference! He didn't do a press conference!’” Trump exclaimed, mimicking imagined punditry.

It was not the first time, however, that Trump had departed on a petulant note.

At the July 2018 NATO summit in Brussels, the president interrupted a wrap-up session about Ukraine to threaten to change America's commitment to the alliance if other countries did not ante up more money for defense on the spot. Trump had been fuming that morning because he did not think the media had adequately captured his anger with Germany and other nations over their levels of defense spending.

Trump's move, which many allies interpreted as signaling the possible withdrawal of the United States from NATO, triggered an emergency confab.

Afterward, many leaders looked drained, as though they had passed through a physical ordeal.

That's how some of them had felt a month earlier when Trump stormed out of a G-7 summit in Quebec by retracting U.S. support for the joint communique that already had been agreed to in an effort to demonstrate unity among the allies.

Aboard Air Force One en route to his next stop — Singapore, for a historic summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un — Trump lashed out at the G-7's host on Twitter. He called Trudeau “meek and mild” and “very dishonest & weak” after the Canadian prime minister spoke out against the tariffs Trump had imposed against some Canadian imports.


An image from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, left, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, center, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, and the back of French President Emmanuel Macron as the leaders were caught laughing about President Trump's lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on Tuesday in London. — Photograph: NATO TV/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
An image from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, left, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, center, British Prime Minister
Boris Johnson, right, and the back of French President Emmanuel Macron as the leaders were caught laughing about President Trump's
lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on Tuesday in London. — Photograph: NATO TV/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


It was, of course, not the last time Trudeau would find himself in Trump's crosshairs. After all, the video of Trudeau and other leaders mocking the president prompted Trump's “two-faced” dig — and may well have influenced his hasty departure from Watford.

By Thursday morning — after returning to Washington D.C. with no major agreements in hand — Trump was crowing about the trip as a great success.

“Tremendous things achieved for U.S. on my NATO trip,” Trump tweeted. “Proudly for our Country, no President has ever achieved so much in so little time.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. Rucker also is a Political Analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

Michael Birnbaum is the Brussels bureau chief for The Washington Post. He previously served as the bureau chief in Moscow and in Berlin, and was an education reporter. He has covered the conflict in Ukraine, the Egyptian revolution, the fall of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi and the Arab Spring elsewhere in the Middle East. He has also worked at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Birnbaum has a degree in German history from Yale University. He grew up in Chicago.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/unruly-pouty-and-boastful-a-field-guide-for-trumps-journeys-abroad/2019/12/05/45dce878-1751-11ea-bf81-ebe89f477d1e_story.html

 86 
 on: December 06, 2019, 02:20:12 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

‘Everybody wants to make a deal’: Struggling to negotiate,
Trump often claims countries are eager to talk


As the president campaigns up for reelection, his boasts about eager negotiating partners could
face scrutiny from voters who expected more results from the self-described master dealmaker.


By TOLUSE OLORUNNIPA | 5:02PM EST — Tuesday, December 03, 2019

President Donald J. Trump listens as French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during a meeting at Winfield House during the NATO summit on Tuesday. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump listens as French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during a meeting at Winfield House during the NATO summit on Tuesday.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


IN President Trump's telling, everyone he's negotiating with has something in common: They're all dying to make a deal with him.

Whether it's Iran, China, Japan, Russia or the Taliban — Trump claims there's a mad rush by foreign friends and foes alike to sit at the table with him and negotiate on his terms. He has repeated the same boastful talking point even as he's struggled to finalize major deals.

“Let me tell you, the China trade deal is dependent on one thing: Do I want to make it?” Trump said Tuesday during a summit of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization alliance in London. The Chinese, he added, “want to make a deal now.”

Minutes later, Trump said Saudi Arabia was “very happy” to agree to pay the United States for military protection and that Russia “very badly” wanted to strike an arms control agreement.

“Russia wants to make a deal as recently as like two weeks ago,” he said.

But as Trump campaigns for re-election, he has abandoned more deals than he has struck, and his boasts about eager negotiating partners could face scrutiny from voters who expected more results from the self-described master deal-maker, said Barbara Perry, a presidential historian at the University of Virginia's Miller Center of Public Affairs.

“Three years into his term, are there going to be people who say, ‘He promised me X, and I didn't get it, and now I'm not voting for him’?” she said. “It's certainly a high-wire act.”

In some cases, other countries have flatly contradicted Trump or expressed surprise about his assertions, indicating that some of his claims of favorable negotiating conditions are more wishful thinking than reality.

During a Thanksgiving Day visit to troops in Afghanistan, Trump said the Taliban “wants to make a deal” and that “tremendous progress” had been made.

“They didn't want to do a cease-fire, but now they do want to do a cease-fire,” Trump said of the militants.

But the next day, neither the Taliban nor the government of Afghan President Ashraf Ghani indicated that a cease-fire was even under discussion.

More than 100 times over the past two years, Trump has claimed that China was anxious to end the trade war by capitulating to his demands. In one case this summer, he claimed he had received high-level phone calls from Chinese officials pining for a deal — something that China immediately denied.

“China is dying to make a deal with me,” Trump told reporters on July 30.

Months earlier, China was also desperate to strike a deal — at least in Trump's telling.

“China wants to make a deal very badly,” Trump said on November 20, 2018. “They might not say that to you, but they want to make it very badly.”

But Trump has not secured such a deal, and the trade war has only escalated with both sides imposing tariffs on imported goods. Trump has repeatedly hailed some intermediate steps, including Chinese pledges to purchase American agricultural goods, while the broader negotiations have failed to sustain momentum.

On Tuesday, Trump indicated the long-awaited deal with China may not happen for another year, but said he's fine with that despite his boasts about Beijing's desperation to get a deal done.

“I have no deadline,” he told reporters. “In some ways, I think it's better to wait until after the election, if you want to know the truth.”

While Trump previously has pointed to his “great friendship” with Chinese President Xi Jinping as a reason for optimism about a trade agreement, on Tuesday he said the relationship has soured.

“I don't think he likes me so much anymore,” Trump told reporters.

The shift from ambitious claims about soon-to-be-announced deals to more realistic assessments about their slim prospects has become a familiar one in the Trump administration.

The president has claimed that the Palestinians want to make a deal with Israel; that Iran was eager to meet with him to renegotiate the nuclear agreement he abandoned; that North Korea's Kim Jong Un wanted to abandon his nuclear program; and that Japan was ready to capitulate to his demands to avoid car tariffs.

But deals with all of those actors have been elusive, and in some cases, Trump has lost ground after touting progress.

“We're getting close. And they want to make a deal,” Trump said in August when asked about France's digital services tax. “And we'll see if we can make a deal. We're getting close.”

On Tuesday, Trump said he would slap tariffs on French wine and other products as retaliation for the digital services tax, which hits American technology companies. Trump's administration said on Monday that the French tax should be met with tariffs on $2.4 billion in imports, a significant escalation that indicated a deal with France had become unlikely.

In his 1987 book “The Art of the Deal”, Trump encouraged aspiring deal-makers to “use your leverage,” advocating a high-pressure approach to forcing a competitor's hand. Trump continues to embrace the themes of his book as he tries to strike deals from the White House, Perry said.

The president often credits himself with creating favorable negotiating conditions, asserting he has forced other countries to the table by pressuring them with drastic moves.

Trump said Russia wanted to strike an arms deal only because he had pulled out of the existing treaty. He said China wanted to make a deal because his tariff campaign had tanked its economy. He said the Palestinians would be eager to negotiate a peace deal with Israel because he had moved the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, taking that contentious issue off the table. He claimed the Taliban was ready to agree on a cease-fire only because he increased military pressure on the militants after a potential agreement fell through in September.

“Everybody wants to make a deal,” Trump told WITN-TV in Greenville, North Carolina, in July.

There's little proof any of that has actually worked to secure the deals Trump seeks. In many cases, his moves have angered the other party or pushed it to consider new alternatives.

Trump has repeatedly highlighted the victories from his un­or­tho­dox negotiating strategy, including Mexico's willingness to deploy troops to stop migrants from crossing the border and the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that's pending before Congress.

And Trump's showmanship has worked with his core supporters, who continue to believe in his deal-making abilities, said Perry.

“As he sees the clock running out on the final year of his term, now he will turn to the next argument,” she said. “Which is: ‘Well, I haven't gotten the best deal that I wanted … so of course you need to re-elect me to make sure that great deal that I assured you would happen, will happen’.”Karen DeYoung and Susannah George contributed to this report.


__________________________________________________________________________

Karen DeYoung and Susannah George contributed to this report.

Toluse “Tolu” Olorunnipa is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. He joined The Post in 2019, after five years at Bloomberg News, where he reported on politics and policy from Washington and Florida. Olorunnipa has covered the White House since 2015, reporting from five continents and more than 20 countries as part of the presidential press corps. He started his career at the Miami Herald, where he covered real estate, natural disasters and crime — sometimes all at once. Olorunnipa is also an on-air contributor to CNN. Olorunnipa was educated at Stanford University where he earned a BA and a MA in Sociology.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/everybody-wants-to-make-a-deal-struggling-to-negotiate-trump-often-claims-countries-are-eager-to-talk/2019/12/03/03a1469c-15ea-11ea-8406-df3c54b3253e_story.html

 87 
 on: December 06, 2019, 02:18:14 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

France threatens strong ‘riposte’ to Trump's
proposed tariffs on French goods


The U.S. tariffs would come in response to a French tax on American tech firms.

By JAMES McAULEY | 2:41PM EST — Tuesday, December 03, 2019

A cheesemonger at Paris's Beaufils cuts a large piece of Comte cheese on March 27, 2019. — Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters.
A cheesemonger at Paris's Beaufils cuts a large piece of Comte cheese on March 27, 2019. — Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters.

PARIS — The French government fired back on Tuesday against the Trump administration's threats to slap hefty tariffs on dozens of popular French products, insisting that the European Union would retaliate if the White House went through with its proposal.

Later in the day, President Trump suggested that some kind of compromise might be achievable, and French President Emmanuel Macron indicated his willingness to work toward one. This came hours after Bruno Le Maire, France's finance minister, vowed what he called a “strong European riposte” to Trump's proposed tariffs.

“This is not the behavior we expect from the United States vis-a-vis one of its principal allies, France, and, in a general manner, Europe,” Le Maire said, speaking on France's Radio Classique. He called the proposed tariffs — as much as 100 percent on about $2.4 billion in imported goods, including wines, cheeses and certain designer clothes — “unacceptable”.

Agnès Pannier-Runacher, a junior economy minister, was even more unflinching in her remarks. “We need to be pugnacious,” she said Tuesday, speaking to France's Sud Radio.

The Trump administration's proposal, announced late on Monday, comes in retaliation to a French tax on certain U.S. tech firms, including Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon. (Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder and chief executive, owns The Washington Post).

Known as GAFA, the tax will take 3 percent of the annual revenue that those four behemoths earn in France. It has long been a point of contention between Trump and Macron, who initially enjoyed a relatively drama-free relationship. They have butted heads, however, ever since Macron failed to persuade Trump to preserve the Iran nuclear deal, a signature policy achievement of the Obama administration. Trump pulled the United States out of the deal last year.

“They're our companies, they're American companies,” Trump said on Tuesday. “If anyone is going to take advantage of the American companies, it's going to be us. It's not going to be France.”

He, however, appeared to retreat from his tough stance a little later, suggesting that it would probably be possible to achieve a compromise with France on trade.

“We do a lot of trade with France and we have a minor dispute. I think we'll probably be able to work it out,” Trump said. “But we have a big trade relationship, and I'm sure that within a short period of time, things will be looking very rosy, we hope. That's usually the case with the two of us, we work it out.”

Macron also expressed confidence that both sides would resolve their dispute over the digital tax.

Trump had earlier disparaged controversial remarks about NATO that Macron made last month as “very, very nasty”. In an interview with the Economist, the French president described what he called NATO's “brain death”, which he couched largely as a function of diminished U.S. support for the alliance under Trump.

Macron had struggled to find broad E.U. support for his digital tax, so how France would follow up on its threat of a “strong European riposte” to the United States on its behalf is unclear.

“In this, as in all other trade-related matters, the European Union will act and react as one,” Daniel Rosario, the European Commission's spokesman for trade and agriculture, told reporters in Brussels on Tuesday.

Rosario said the E.U. would “seek immediate discussions with the United States on how to solve this issue amicably.”

The Trump administration's announcement had an immediate effect on the markets on Tuesday morning. Shares in Hermès, the French luxury brand known for handbags and silks, dropped by roughly 2 percent; those of the luxury goods conglomerate LVMH fell by 1.5 percent.


__________________________________________________________________________

James McAuley is Paris correspondent for The Washington Post. He holds a PhD in French history from the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar and is a fluent French speaker.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/france-threatens-strong-riposte-to-trumps-proposed-tariffs-on-french-goods/2019/12/03/16aa5310-15d0-11ea-80d6-d0ca7007273f_story.html

 88 
 on: December 06, 2019, 12:59:05 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

The only cocks sucked are those of Putin and Kim Jong-un and Trump not only sucked their cocks, but he swallowed too!!

 89 
 on: December 06, 2019, 12:57:44 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Would that be those same “fucken stupid royal inbreds and self-serving corrupt elite trash” who Trump is so desperate to ingratiate himself with in a desperate attempt to be accepted?

Look at the way Trump sucks up to the British royals. He is soooooo desperate to be part of the “in” crowd.

Naturally, the “in” crowd laugh at Trump because he is such a stupid dickhead who allows himself to be played like a fiddle by the likes of Putin and Kim Jong-un.

 90 
 on: December 06, 2019, 10:45:08 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants

you think your team scored a point
fucken stupid royal inbreds and self-serving corrupt elite trash
you sure they were not laughing at Andrew the paedophile

you should read this you dumbo white trash commie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ccASsjhhgP8

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