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 51 
 on: January 05, 2019, 05:56:22 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JC6_d4TQak

 52 
 on: January 05, 2019, 05:33:25 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
talking bullshit again

 53 
 on: January 05, 2019, 02:00:18 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 54 
 on: January 05, 2019, 01:49:37 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

CLICK HERE to read about Robert S. Mueller III's distinguished military career in the service of his country, during which he was shot in the leg during combat and was awarded two medals for valour. A brave, brave, patriotic man.

There is no point providing a link to Donald J. Trump's military service, because there is none due to Trump being a yellow-bellied, spineless, gutless coward who shirked his duty when his country called upon him. In earlier times, women would have been presenting white feathers to the gutless wonder Donald J. Trump because of his cowardice.

 55 
 on: January 05, 2019, 08:17:29 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
Democratic Party an insane asylum run by inmates

It's a good job the house is controlled by an old retarded cat lady lol


JFK was giving Pelosi a good rooting for 7yrs lol



 56 
 on: January 05, 2019, 08:11:21 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
MUELLER he's a coverup artist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qSzqL5IPWg&t=6s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wjM6BGeEM-Q

 57 
 on: January 04, 2019, 08:10:28 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey
Quote
So he definitely won't get legislation passed now the Democrats hold the majority in Congress

I think you make a big mistake

Republicans now hold a bigger majority in the Senate

and yes there will be fun and games
I'll get the popcorn out.


SNIGGER



from The Washington Post…

Speaker Pelosi will show Trump he's not the only one
with power in Washington


The president will learn that “government-by-tantrum” doesn't always work.

By EUGENE ROBINSON | 5:08PM EST — Thursday, January 03, 2018

Nancy Pelosi was elected and sworn in as Speaker of the House on January 3, and pledged to pursue transparency, truth and compromise in the 116th Congress. — Photograph: Matt McClain/The Washington Post.
Nancy Pelosi was elected and sworn in as Speaker of the House on January 3, and pledged to pursue transparency, truth and compromise
in the 116th Congress. — Photograph: Matt McClain/The Washington Post.


THE U.S. Capitol really was “the people's house” on Thursday. The sky may have been overcast and the temperature chilly, but still there was the feeling of dawn.

The new Congress was being sworn in, and the building was thronged with friends and family who came to fill the galleries. Because of the unprecedented diversity of the incoming House majority, the crowd looked more like America than in years past. Beginnings beget optimism. The day of ceremony was a welcome respite from the mean-spirited buffoonery found at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue.

To get to the Capitol, I drove and walked past other “people's houses” that were shuttered. The Smithsonian Institution — often called the greatest museum complex in the world — is closed because of a stupid and wholly unnecessary government shutdown, triggered by President Trump out of ignorance and pique. Trump closed about one-fourth of the government in an attempt to force taxpayers to waste billions of dollars pretending to build an unbuildable border wall that Trump promised would be paid for by Mexico.

“I will take the mantle of shutting down,” Trump promised in December. As trash piles up in our majestic national parks, border agents perform their dangerous work without pay and affected agencies run out of emergency funds, the mantle of shame is Trump's alone.

It is only fitting, after the past two years of bumbling dysfunction, that the new Democratic majority in the House — led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Democrat-California) — debuts amid a crisis Republicans managed to create all by themselves.

Remember that Trump had GOP majorities in both chambers of Congress and still, somehow, managed to bluster and blunder his way into a shutdown. That's difficult to do. It's kind of like wearing both a belt and suspenders, and still having your pants fall down around your ankles.

One thing Pelosi brings, as she becomes speaker for the second time, is competence. That should be a reason for optimism, regardless of party affiliation or political views.


Representative Nancy Pelosi (Democrat-California), surrounded by her grandchildren and other young relatives of lawmakers, raises her right hand as she is sworn in as House speaker Thursday on Capitol Hill. — Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press.
Representative Nancy Pelosi (Democrat-California), surrounded by her grandchildren and other young relatives of lawmakers, raises her right hand
as she is sworn in as House speaker Thursday on Capitol Hill. — Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press.


During the past eight years, when John A. Boehner (Republican-Ohio) and Paul D. Ryan (Republican-Wisconsin) held the speaker's gavel, I often heard Pelosi express great exasperation — not just at their wrongheaded priorities but also at their failure to display skills she considered elementary. It sometimes falls to a speaker to pass legislation that many in the majority caucus do not like. In 2007, Pelosi needed approval of a bill funding the war in Iraq, which barely a handful of House Democrats supported. She got the bill through — and also gave her caucus the chance to go on the record as opposing the war.

Boehner and Ryan let themselves be tied in knots by the so-called Hastert rule — named after a former GOP speaker — under which they pledged not to bring legislation to the floor unless it had the support of a majority of the majority caucus. Pelosi knows the speaker's proper role is not to blindly obey consensus but to actively shape it.

She planned to begin by having the House pass a series of bills to reopen the government by funding most affected agencies through September — except the Department of Homeland Security, which would be funded only through to February 8. That would allow things to return to normal and provide a month for further debate about Trump's fanciful border wall.

“We have given the Republicans a chance to take ‘yes’ for an answer,” Pelosi said on Wednesday. But since when is Trump's GOP smart enough to do that?

I wish I could predict that Democratic control of the House will automatically make everything better. I can't. Despite now-Senator Mitt Romney's defiant op-ed in The Washington Post, the Republican Party remains essentially a zombielike servant of Trump. He keeps telling congressional Republicans to jump off cliffs, and they keep taking the plunge. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky) said this week that he will not even bring to the floor House-passed spending measures — that the Senate last month unanimously approved.

But for the first time, Trump will confront an opposition that has real power. All the frenzied tweeting in the world can't take back his self-proclaimed ownership of the “Trump shutdown,” as Pelosi calls it. How much garbage needs to pile up on the Mall before McConnell, who has made deals with Pelosi before, seeks a way out of the impasse? How many government paychecks and subsidy payments have to be missed?

Trump will learn that “government-by-tantrum” doesn't always work — and, more to the point, that he's not the only one in Washington with real power.


__________________________________________________________________________

Eugene Robinson writes a twice-a-week column on politics and culture for The Washington Post and hosts a weekly online chat with readers. In a three-decade career at The Post, Robinson has been city hall reporter, city editor, foreign correspondent in Buenos Aires and London, foreign editor, and assistant managing editor in charge of the paper's Style section. He started writing a column for the Op-Ed page in 2005. In 2009, he received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for “his eloquent columns on the 2008 presidential campaign that focus on the election of the first African-American president, showcasing graceful writing and grasp of the larger historic picture.” Robinson is the author of Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America (2010), Last Dance in Havana (2004), and Coal to Cream: A Black Man's Journey Beyond Color to an Affirmation of Race (1999). He lives with his wife and two sons in Arlington.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Nancy Pelosi becomes House speaker

 • VIDEO: What Nancy Pelosi wants to accomplish as speaker

 • VIDEO: Pelosi: ‘We are diligent and persistent in trying to open up government’

 • House Democrats vote to reopen government and deny Trump wall money, defying veto threat

 • Pelosi reclaims speakership and secures place as most powerful woman in politics

 • Jennifer Rubin: The people's house: A new beginning

 • Jennifer Rubin: Speaker Pelosi should inspire Americans — and terrify Trump cronies

 • The weirdly quiet White House


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/speaker-pelosi-will-show-trump-hes-not-the-only-one-with-power-in-washington/2019/01/03/aedaf696-0f99-11e9-84fc-d58c33d6c8c7_story.html

 58 
 on: January 04, 2019, 02:50:41 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Trump in the mood to grumble

He talks about his ‘lonely’ holiday, defends Syria decision and criticizes Mattis.

By ELI STOKOLS | Thursday, January 03, 2019

President Donald J. Trump talked to reporters for more than 90 minutes on Wednesday, airing lingering grievances during a Cabinet meeting at the White House. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump talked to reporters for more than 90 minutes on Wednesday, airing lingering grievances during a Cabinet meeting at the White House.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


WASHINGTON D.C. — President Trump, as he often does, had a few things to say.

After admitting that he had been lonely over the holidays, Trump took advantage of his first public appearance of the new year on Wednesday to air lingering grievances, make multiple false claims and reinforce recent decisions that have rattled financial markets and his party's leaders.

As he held forth for more than 90 minutes before a small pool of reporters and photographers, members of his Cabinet, ostensibly called to the White House for a meeting, sat quietly around a long conference table.

Trump defended his decision last month to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria and sharply cut the deployment to Afghanistan, moves that disturbed Republican allies in Congress and prompted the resignation of Defense Secretary James N. Mattis. In doing so, he contradicted his own recent claim that the U.S. had achieved its objectives of total victory over Islamic State militants in Syria.

“Syria was lost long ago,” he said.

“Look, we don't want Syria,” he continued. “We're talking about sand and death. That's what we’re talking about. We're not talking about vast wealth. We're talking about sand and death,” he said, seemingly contrasting the war-wracked country with Iraq and its vast oil reserves.

Iran “can do what they want there, frankly,” he added, a comment likely to unnerve officials in Israel, who have worried that a U.S. withdrawal from its positions in eastern Syria would allow Iran to expand its influence there.

“It's not my fault,” he said. “I didn't put us there.”

Trump offered little further clarity on the U.S. withdrawal from Syria, which he initially said would take place in 30 days, saying now that the pullout will “take place over a period of time.”

Later, in a long riff about Afghanistan, Trump seemed to endorse Moscow's 1979 invasion of the country — an act that the U.S. viewed as an attempt to spread communism and waged a long, covert operation to combat during the Carter and Reagan administrations.

“The reason Russia was in Afghanistan was because terrorists were going into Russia,” Trump said, making a case to leave the policing of hot spots in the Mideast and Central Asia to countries in the region. “They were right to be there. The problem is it was a tough fight.”

The Soviet Union eventually was bankrupted by its Afghan war, Trump added. “Russia used to be the Soviet Union. Afghanistan made it Russia, because they went bankrupt fighting in Afghanistan.”

Historians generally agree that the Russian invasion and subsequent occupation of much of Afghanistan was one of several factors that contributed to the collapse of the Soviet Union, although the country never went bankrupt.

For years, Republicans have credited President Reagan with bringing an end to the Soviet Union by his aggressive increase in U.S. military spending.

Trump's comments stood in stark contrast to the view Mattis espoused in the resignation letter he presented last month after failing to convince the president to hold off on withdrawing from Syria.

“We must do everything possible to advance an international order that is most conducive to our security, prosperity and values, and we are strengthened in this effort by the solidarity of our alliances,” Mattis wrote.

Mattis' comments clearly stung Trump, who responded last month with criticism of his former Pentagon chief. On Wednesday, he stepped that up, claiming that he fired Mattis.

“What's he done for me? How had he done in Afghanistan? Not too good,” Trump said. “As you know, President Obama fired him, and essentially so did I.”

Obama did not fire Mattis, although the general did retire several months early in 2013 from his position as the head of the military's Central Command after dissenting from Obama administration policy decisions.

Tuesday was Mattis' final day at the Pentagon. Trump, in a fit of pique after the resignation letter became public, had moved up Mattis' termination date.

In addition to his foreign policy comments, Trump also downplayed December's stock market losses, which erased all positive gains for the year, as “a little glitch” and asserted — wrongly — that there are “probably 30-35 million” immigrants in the U.S. illegally. The non-partisan Pew Research Center estimates that as of 2016, there were 10.7 million unauthorized immigrants living in the country, a number that has declined in recent years.

Trump repeated his call for Democrats to agree to $5.6 billion in funding for a border wall, and expressed surprise not to have received overtures from them over the holidays to negotiate an end to the government shutdown.

“I was in the White House all by myself for six or seven days,” he said. “It was very lonely. My family was down in Florida. I said, ‘Stay there and enjoy yourself’. I felt I should be here just in case people wanted to come and negotiate the border security.”

Trump, who met later in the day with congressional leaders away from TV cameras, has already dismissed a funding proposal from House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi that includes $1.3 billion in border security funding.

While leaving the door open to a compromise, Trump continued to argue for the importance of a wall, pointing to other examples of barriers. He incorrectly asserted that Obama's Washington residence is surrounded by a 10-foot wall and cited the Vatican, which he said “has the biggest wall of them all.”

“When they say the wall is immoral, then you better do something about the Vatican,” he said. “Walls work.”

As Trump spoke, a “Game of Thrones”-style movie poster teasing Iran sanctions — “SANCTIONS ARE COMING,” it read — lay unfurled across the table directly in front of him. But he made no remarks on the subject.

He did, however, comment on Senator-elect Mitt Romney of Utah, who wrote in The Washington Post on Tuesday that he was troubled by Trump's “deep descent in December” and that his deficit in “presidential leadership in qualities of character … has been most glaring.”

“I wish Mitt could be more of a team player,” Trump said. “And if he's not, that's OK too.”

Seeming to warn Romney about the fate that lies ahead for Republican lawmakers who vocally criticize him and his presidency, Trump boasted that he “got rid of” former Senators Jeff Flake of Arizona and Bob Corker of Tennessee, both of whom opted not to seek new terms last year.

Accusing both men of seeking publicity in taking stands against him, Trump suggested that Flake would be seeking a job as a paid cable news contributor — or perhaps in another profession that Trump himself once plied.

“Jeff Flake is now selling real estate or whatever he's doing,” he said dismissively.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Eli Stokols is a White House reporter based in the Los Angeles Times Washington, D.C., bureau. He is a veteran of Politico and The Wall Street Journal, where he covered the 2016 presidential campaign and then the Trump White House. A native of Irvine, Stokols grew up in a L.A. Times household and is thrilled to report for what is still his family's hometown paper. He is also a graduate of UC Berkeley and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=7cf7d016-c072-4a71-bbca-c0d73e4cac1d
https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=e071a602-e51a-4720-84a6-a8814967e175

 59 
 on: January 04, 2019, 02:49:35 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times…

Shutdown stinks for beloved national parks

Visitors are misbehaving now that park rangers are not on the job, trash is not being picked up, roads
are not being cleared of snow, sites in campgrounds are not being assigned and restrooms are locked.


By DAVID HORSEY | 9:54AM PST — Thursday, January 03, 2019



ON those rare occasions when the federal government gets shut down by political gamesmanship in the nation's capital, the places where the effects of those shutdowns can be seen most quickly and easily are America's beloved national parks.

This time around, as President Donald Trump holds his finger on the pause button of government while he digs in to get funding for his vague border-wall scheme, many national parks are still technically open. However, park rangers are not on the job, trash is not being picked up, roads are not being cleared of snow, sites in campgrounds are not being assigned and restrooms are locked. Some parks, like Mount Rainier National Park, are now largely inaccessible. Others, like Yosemite and Joshua Tree, are easier to get into.

The result is near anarchy. Off-road vehicles are being taken into restricted, environmentally sensitive areas. Campers are asserting competing claims for prime camping areas. Trash is piling up. So is human waste.

If a government shutdown is an indicator of political immaturity, the bad behavior inside some national parks is evidence that at least some citizens are in desperate need of adult supervision.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/shutdown-stinks-for-beloved-national-parks

 60 
 on: January 04, 2019, 02:32:01 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

National parks, trashed in shutdown, restrict access

Yosemite and Joshua Tree overwhelmed by bad behavior and human waste.

By JAVIER PANZAR | Thursday, January 03, 2019

Rangers close off the road to a campground at Joshua Tree National Park. All of its campgrounds were closed at noon on Wednesday because the government shutdown prevented routine cleanup and maintenance. — Photograph: Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times.
Rangers close off the road to a campground at Joshua Tree National Park. All of its campgrounds were closed at noon on Wednesday because the government
shutdown prevented routine cleanup and maintenance. — Photograph: Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times.


IF Californians ever wondered how the state's most majestic open spaces would fare without adult supervision, the partial federal government shutdown is offering a grim picture.

At Joshua Tree National Park, champagne bottles were left strewn on the desert floor on New Year's morning, along with a prom dress. Someone had kicked one of the iconic trees, perhaps to see how sturdy it was. Human waste was piling up.

At Yosemite, Death Valley, Joshua Tree and beyond, the nearly two-week-long shutdown has taken a toll. Reports of vandalism, illegal camping and off-road driving have led to restricted operations.

Even under the best conditions, California's popular outdoor destinations can strain under the throngs of visitors. But the skeleton crews and volunteers now patrolling the parks have shown how essential maintenance and rules enforcement are to keeping the order.

“We just can't continue at the pace we have been at for the last 12 days,” said Sabra Purdy, co-owner of Joshua Tree, California-based Cliffhanger Guides, who has been coordinating volunteer cleanup efforts.

Campgrounds at Joshua Tree closed at noon on Wednesday, officials said, citing health and safety concerns over vault toilets that are near capacity. The waterless bathrooms in which visitors can relieve themselves into a sealed container buried underground had remained open. But with no workers to pump out the waste, those are being closed now as well.

Meanwhile, rangers at Yosemite National Park have set a roadside checkpoint up at the southern entrance, along California Highway 41. Only people with reservations for lodging or camping inside the park will be allowed entrance between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m., officials said.

According to National Park Service spokesman Andrew Munoz, illegal off-road vehicles have damaged some habitat, and the buildup of trash and litter has had a significant effect on the environment. There is also concern that the increased trash could attract wildlife, including bears, to populated areas, increasing the risk of dangerous encounters.

Problems with human feces and urine along Highway 41 in the south part of Yosemite have led to the closure of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, as well as the Wawona and Hodgdon Meadow campgrounds last week. Two snow play areas and all the park visitor centers remain closed.

Park officials said additional facilities or areas in Yosemite National Park may close at any time for health and safety reasons.

Federal lands around the country are suffering from a lack of basic government services as the shutdown continues. Trash is piling up around national monuments in Washington, forcing the city government to pick it up instead. Tourists are posting photos on social media of trash overflowing at national parks and recreation areas, including Lake Mead in Nevada.

In Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, about 250 miles north of Los Angeles, sections were closed this week because furloughed employees have been unable to maintain the safety of roads and certain walking paths in winter conditions.

Park officials said that as of 6 p.m. on Monday, they had closed the Generals Highway at Hospital Rock. The closure extends from Giant Forest and Lodgepole through to Lost Grove.


At Joshua Tree National Park, Natalie Elsman of Iowa packs her car at Jumbo Rocks after getting word on Tuesday that campgrounds were closing. — Photograph: Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times.
At Joshua Tree National Park, Natalie Elsman of Iowa packs her car at Jumbo Rocks after getting word on Tuesday that campgrounds were closing.
 — Photograph: Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times.


At Joshua Tree, visitor centers, flush toilets, water-filling stations and dump stations are all closed. The park had left the main gates open and let cars stream in for free, as there are no government employees to collect the typical $30 entrance fee.

Rangers at Joshua Tree and Yosemite remain on duty and are enforcing closures. Individuals who violate closures are being cited, Munoz said.

December is a favorite time for climbers, hikers and tourists to visit the desert park. Rangers at Joshua Tree counted 284,398 visitors in December 2017, most in the second half of the month.

And unlike the 2013 government shutdown, the park has remained open — leaving locals to pick up the slack.

The situation is being aided by local volunteers who have been emptying dumpsters, replacing garbage bags in trash cans and scrubbing bathrooms daily.

A group of eight volunteers organized by the city of Twentynine Palms Tourism Business Improvement District went out New Year's Day to clean up the detritus left over from the year-end revelry in the park the night before. They hauled more than 40 garbage bags worth of trash in the beds of their pickup trucks and Priuses, said Breanne Dusastre, the director of marketing and tourism development for the district.

“And a whole lot of champagne bottles,” she said.

Purdy has been leading a group of 10 to 12 volunteers into the park every morning to clean bathrooms and haul trash away in trucks and trailers to a local dump.

But the grind is wearing on volunteers and the amount of trash generated over the holidays has been staggering, she said. She found a discarded prom dress in the park recently. Another problem is that without park staff around to check on camping groups, people have been doubling or quadrupling the number of people allowed at campsites.

She said she agreed with park officials decision to close down the campground sites and leave the park open only as a day use site.

“I think that it is the right call,” she said. “Once those pit toilets are full the volunteers can't really do anything about it. We have to get the toilets pumped before they can take any more stuff.”

Death Valley National Park also has been feeling the strain of overused outhouses and uncollected trash, though the Furnace Creek Visitor Center reopened after a non-profit organization made a donation.


__________________________________________________________________________

Los Angeles Times staff writers Michael Ottey in Joshua Tree and Mary Forgione in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

• Javier Panzar is a reporter for the Los Angeles Times. He was born and raised in Oakland. His reporting has appeared in The Boston Globe, The Seattle Times, the Orange County Register and UC Berkeley's independent student newspaper, the Daily Californian.

https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=158c79a8-5db9-478c-a8df-c3f18bbbdd66
https://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=017c0858-cede-4502-916b-ff449a945105

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