Xtra News Community 2
July 18, 2018, 08:56:42 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
   Home   Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10
 41 
 on: July 10, 2018, 04:19:05 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Boris Johnson and ‘Brexit minister’ resign,
leaving Theresa May's government in disarray


Hard-line backers of Britain's split with the European Union claim that the British
government is reneging on promises for a clean break from the bloc.


By WILLIAM BOOTH and KARLA ADAM | 5:06PM EDT — Monday, July 09, 2018

In this image from TV, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May gives statement in the parliament on Monday July 9, 2018. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson resigned on Monday, adding to divisions over Brexit that threaten to tear apart Prime Minister Theresa May's government. — Photograph: British Parliamentary Recording Unit/Associated Press.
In this image from TV, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May gives statement in the parliament on Monday July 9, 2018. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson
resigned on Monday, adding to divisions over Brexit that threaten to tear apart Prime Minister Theresa May's government.
 — Photograph: British Parliamentary Recording Unit/Associated Press.


LONDON — Prime Minister Theresa May struggled on Monday to keep her government from imploding after the resignations of Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, a tousle-haired frontman for Britain's campaign to leave the European Union, and David Davis, her once-loyal “Brexit minister” in charge of negotiating the country's split from the bloc.

Ever since May bungled the 2017 election, losing a majority in Parliament, there has been speculation over how long she would hold the top job. That question has never been more urgent.

As May prepares to meet this week with President Trump in his first official visit to Britain, hard-line Brexiteers are openly debating a no-confidence vote that could sweep her from power.

Johnson, a flamboyant politician and former mayor of London, once said, “My chances of being PM are about as good as the chances of finding Elvis on Mars.” He is divisive, and his stock has fallen lately. But the Whitehall mandarins and British political class have long assumed he covets the keys to 10 Downing Street. His departure hints at a possible leadership challenge within May's Conservative Party.

In his resignation letter, Johnson wrote that the Brexit dream “is dying, suffocated by needless self-doubt.” He said that Britain was “headed for the status of colony — and many will struggle to see the economic or political advantage of that particular arrangement.”

“I am sorry — and a little surprised,” May wrote in reply.

Johnson's allies say he did the honorable thing by resigning. His critics see selfish maneuvering.

May replaced Johnson on Monday with Jeremy Hunt, formerly the health secretary, who successfully secured a big bump in spending for the underfunded National Health Service. Hunt campaigned to remain in the E.U. but later said he had changed his mind. May named as Davis's successor 44-year-old Dominic Raab, a leading pro-Brexit campaigner who served as her housing minister.

But the bombshell resignations expose May to further confrontations with restive Conservative Party members outraged over what they see as the prime minister's plan for a “soft Brexit” that keeps Britain tied to many E.U. rules and regulations after it leaves the bloc in March 2019.


Anti-Brexit, pro-EU supporter Steve Bray holds placards on Abingdon Green across the road from the Houses of Parliament in London on Monday, July 9, 2018. Former U.K. Brexit Secretary David Davis said on Monday that he won't seek to challenge Prime Minister Theresa May's leadership after resigning from her Cabinet, but will aim to pressure her to toughen her position on Britain's departure from the European Union. — Photograph: Matt Dunham/Associated Press.
Anti-Brexit, pro-EU supporter Steve Bray holds placards on Abingdon Green across the road from the Houses of Parliament in London on Monday, July 9, 2018.
Former U.K. Brexit Secretary David Davis said on Monday that he won't seek to challenge Prime Minister Theresa May's leadership after resigning from her
Cabinet, but will aim to pressure her to toughen her position on Britain's departure from the European Union. — Photograph: Matt Dunham/Associated Press.


Backers of a hard Brexit, who want a decisive break from Brussels, are now in revolt. They denounced May's latest road map as a fudge, a timid capitulation, a “Brexit in name only” that ignores the 52 percent of voters who opted in June 2016 to leave the E.U.

Tim Bale, a political expert at Queen Mary University of London, said that although May is in a difficult spot, “I don't think it's necessarily fatal for her — at the moment anyways.”

He said the Conservative Party doesn't really have the appetite for another general election — because of the ongoing Brexit negotiations and because Tories haven't coalesced around a candidate to champion.

Johnson has “still got a bit of a fan club, but I'm not sure he's the pin-up that he once was,” Bale said. While some see an English original, others see a clown.

May paid tribute to Davis and Johnson in Parliament on Monday, even though “we do not agree about the best way of delivering our shared commitment to honor the result of the referendum.” When she praised Johnson for his “passion,” jeering erupted in the chamber. When she said Brexit had generated “a spirited national debate,” there were guffaws.

May said she had listened to every possible idea and concluded that hers was the right one to pursue. She urged Brussels to seek compromise. “If the E.U. continues on this course, there is a serious risk it could lead to no deal, and this would most likely be a disorderly no deal,” she said. “A responsible government must prepare for a range of potential outcomes.”

Where May's Brexit plans go now is an open question. Business leaders in Britain who run companies that make airplanes and automobiles are clamoring for answers and warning that Brexit is drifting toward the rocks.

The pound sterling slid after the Johnson resignation, while the markets ticked up.


Boris Johnson at Downing Street earlier this month. — Photograph: Andy Rain/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.
Boris Johnson at Downing Street earlier this month. — Photograph: Andy Rain/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.

Across the English Channel, reaction was muted.

“Politicians come and go, but the problems they have created for their people remain,” European Council President Donald Tusk said on Monday of Davis's exit, just before being informed of Johnson's resignation. He said the same sentiment extended to Johnson as well.

Tusk added: “The mess caused by Brexit is the biggest problem in the history of E.U.-U.K. relations, and it is still far from being resolved.”

Trump is scheduled to arrive on Thursday for a visit that will be closely watched for any comments on Brexit and U.S. relations with the E.U. On Monday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement, “The president continues to look forward to his working visit with the Prime Minister on July 13, and further strengthening the U.S.-U.K. special relationship.”

Last month, Johnson told an audience at a private gala dinner that he thought Trump would do a much better job at negotiating Brexit than his prime minister.

“Imagine Trump doing Brexit,” Johnson told his audience of Tory activists. “He'd go in bloody hard…. There'd be all sorts of breakdowns, all sorts of chaos. Everyone would think he'd gone mad. But actually you might get somewhere. It's a very, very good thought.”

One of the leading campaigners for leaving the E.U., the radio show personality and European parliamentarian Nigel Farage, said on Sunday: “For Brexit to succeed we must get rid of this awful, duplicitous PM.”

If May refuses to toughen her Brexit plan, angry Tories could seek a no-confidence vote. At least 48 Conservative members of Parliament would need to write letters to trigger it. Then May would need to win over the majority of Conservative lawmakers to stay in power.

Many commentators think she has the numbers to win such a vote. If she failed, a leadership contest would ensue — and in might step Johnson, among others.


Britain's former chief Brexit negotiator David Davis poses at Westminster. — Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/Press Association/via Associated Press.
Britain's former chief Brexit negotiator David Davis poses at Westminster. — Photograph: Stefan Rousseau/Press Association/via Associated Press.

In his letter of resignation late on Sunday, Davis suggested that May's promise that Britain and its Parliament would “take back control” from Brussels was hollow. He warned May that her approach would lead to further demands from Brussels and give Europe control of large swaths of the British economy.

For two years, chief negotiator Davis had been the white-haired, ruddy-cheeked face of Brexit. But talks in Brussels were notoriously slow, because May's government could not — and still cannot — agree on what kind of future relationship Britain wants with Europe on trade, immigration, law, tariffs and border checks and security.

Recently it was revealed that Davis had attended only four hours of talks in Brussels this year, going as long as three months without meeting the E.U.'s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier.

David Lammy, a prominent member of the opposition Labour Party, derided Davis as “a man who can't take responsibility. For two years he's been in charge of Brexit. No one in the world is as much to blame for this monumental mess as himself.”

The prime minister had appeared to win over her fractious cabinet at a retreat on Friday, and a lengthy white paper staking out Britain's vision for future relations with Europe was due to be published as soon as this week.

While May's plan for exiting the E.U. has not been fully revealed to all members of her party — let alone to Parliament, the business community or the public — a brief outline shows that she supports a middle way of compromise with Brussels, keeping Britain closely aligned with Europe on standards, “a common rule book for industrial goods and agricultural products.”

That, her critics say, would shackle Britain and make it “a rule taker versus a rulemaker.”

In Parliament, hard-line Brexit supporters are the most vocal but are not the majority. A compromise exit is supported by moderates across Parliament, including those in the Conservative and Labour parties, among others.

Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour Party leader, mocked May on Monday, saying it had taken her two long years to come up with a Brexit plan and only two days for that plan to unravel.


__________________________________________________________________________

Michael Birnbaum in Brussels contributed to this report.

William Booth is The Washington Post's London bureau chief. Booth served as bureau chief in Jerusalem, Mexico City, Los Angeles and Miami, and as pop culture correspondent for the Style section. He has covered upheaval and transformation in Catalonia, Ukraine, Egypt, Libya, Iraq, Haiti, Honduras and the Balkans. In Mexico, his work focused on drug trafficking and the state response. In the Middle East, he covered the Israel-Palestinian conflict. Before coming to The Post, Booth wrote for Science magazine. He was a Vannevar Bush Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and graduated from the University of Texas in Austin. He was on The Washington Post's Pulitzer Prize-finalist team that covered the Fort Hood shootings.

Karla Adam is a reporter in The Washington Post's London bureau. Before joining The Post in 2006, she worked as a freelancer in London for The New York Times and People magazine. She has degrees from Queen's University in Canada, Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and the London School of Economics.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: British lawmakers laugh as May addresses Boris Johnson's resignation

 • Boris Johnson quits UK government in mounting Brexit crisis

 • Britain's Brexit secretary suddenly resigns

 • How the ‘Bad Boys of Brexit’ forged ties with Russia and the Trump campaign — and came under investigators' scrutiny

 • ‘The decision of a lifetime’: Protesters in London call for another Brexit vote


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/theresa-mays-government-in-disarray-after-shock-resignation-by-brexit-minister/2018/07/09/b86533da-8357-11e8-8f6c-46cb43e3f306_story.html

 42 
 on: July 10, 2018, 03:46:39 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Brett Kavanaugh is nominated by Trump to succeed Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy





 43 
 on: July 10, 2018, 02:38:15 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

I wonder if Donald is going to offer to suck Vladamir's dick at Helsinki?







 44 
 on: July 10, 2018, 02:32:38 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times....

Allies can't compete with bromance

Trump likely to get peevish with NATO allies before his love fest with Putin.

By DAVID HORSEY | 3:56PM PDT — Monday, July 09, 2018



IF the past is prologue, President Trump can be counted on to antagonize and offend long-standing allies at the NATO meeting in Brussels this week. Then, during his follow-up summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, NATO's greatest adversary, Trump is almost certain to sing the praises of the dictator and act as if they are the closest of chums. After these two meetings, referring to the President of the United States as the Leader of the Free World may be a gross misnomer.

__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/allies-cant-compete-with-bromance

 45 
 on: July 09, 2018, 06:32:30 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

…attempting to be a bully-boy and coerce countries to support infant-formula manufacturers instead of supporting breast-feading.



from The New York Times…

U.S. Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution Stuns World Health Officials

Trade sanctions. Withdrawal of military aid. The Trump administration used both to try to block
a measure that was considered uncontroversial and embraced by countries around the world.


By ANDREW JACOBS | 7:49PM EDT — Sunday, July 08, 2018

A Brooklyn mother unable to nurse fed her child donated breast milk. The $70 billion infant formula industry has seen sales flatten in wealthy countries in recent years. — Photograph: James Estrin/The New York Times.
A Brooklyn mother unable to nurse fed her child donated breast milk. The $70 billion infant formula industry has seen sales flatten in wealthy countries in recent years.
 — Photograph: James Estrin/The New York Times.


A RESOLUTION to encourage breast-feeding was expected to be approved quickly and easily by the hundreds of government delegates who gathered this spring in Geneva for the United Nations-affiliated World Health Assembly.

Based on decades of research, the resolution says that mother's milk is healthiest for children and countries should strive to limit the inaccurate or misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes.

Then the United States delegation, embracing the interests of infant formula manufacturers, upended the deliberations.

American officials sought to water down the resolution by removing language that called on governments to “protect, promote and support breast-feeding” and another passage that called on policymakers to restrict the promotion of food products that many experts say can have deleterious effects on young children.

When that failed, they turned to threats, according to diplomats and government officials who took part in the discussions. Ecuador, which had planned to introduce the measure, was the first to find itself in the cross hairs.

The Americans were blunt: If Ecuador refused to drop the resolution, Washington would unleash punishing trade measures and withdraw crucial military aid. The Ecuadorean government quickly acquiesced.

The showdown over the issue was recounted by more than a dozen participants from several countries, many of whom requested anonymity because they feared retaliation from the United States.

Health advocates scrambled to find another sponsor for the resolution, but at least a dozen countries, most of them poor nations in Africa and Latin America, backed off, citing fears of retaliation, according to officials from Uruguay, Mexico and the United States.

“We were astonished, appalled and also saddened,” said Patti Rundall, the policy director of the British advocacy group Baby Milk Action, who has attended meetings of the assembly, the decision-making body of the World Health Organization, since the late 1980s.

“What happened was tantamount to blackmail, with the U.S. holding the world hostage and trying to overturn nearly 40 years of consensus on the best way to protect infant and young child health,” she said.

In the end, the Americans' efforts were mostly unsuccessful. It was the Russians who ultimately stepped in to introduce the measure — and the Americans did not threaten them.

The State Department declined to respond to questions, saying it could not discuss private diplomatic conversations. The Department of Health and Human Services, the lead agency in the effort to modify the resolution, explained the decision to contest the resolution's wording but said H.H.S. was not involved in threatening Ecuador.

“The resolution as originally drafted placed unnecessary hurdles for mothers seeking to provide nutrition to their children,” an H.H.S. spokesman said in an email. “We recognize not all women are able to breast-feed for a variety of reasons. These women should have the choice and access to alternatives for the health of their babies, and not be stigmatized for the ways in which they are able to do so.” The spokesman asked to remain anonymous in order to speak more freely.


The United States ambassador to Ecuador, Todd C. Chapman, left, in Quito's historical center with a guide, center, and the undersecretary of state for political affairs, Thomas A. Shannon. — Photograph: Jose Jacome/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.
The United States ambassador to Ecuador, Todd C. Chapman, left, in Quito's historical center with a guide, center, and the undersecretary
of state for political affairs, Thomas A. Shannon. — Photograph: Jose Jacome/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.


Although lobbyists from the baby food industry attended the meetings in Geneva, health advocates said they saw no direct evidence that they played a role in Washington's strong-arm tactics. The $70 billion industry, which is dominated by a handful of American and European companies, has seen sales flatten in wealthy countries in recent years, as more women embrace breast-feeding. Over all, global sales are expected to rise by 4 percent in 2018, according to Euromonitor, with most of that growth occurring in developing nations.

The intensity of the administration's opposition to the breast-feeding resolution stunned public health officials and foreign diplomats, who described it as a marked contrast to the Obama administration, which largely supported W.H.O.'s longstanding policy of encouraging breast-feeding.

During the deliberations, some American delegates even suggested the United States might cut its contribution the W.H.O., several negotiators said. Washington is the single largest contributor to the health organization, providing $845 million, or roughly 15 percent of its budget, last year.

The confrontation was the latest example of the Trump administration siding with corporate interests on numerous public health and environmental issues.

In talks to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Americans have been pushing for language that would limit the ability of Canada, Mexico and the United States to put warning labels on junk food and sugary beverages, according to a draft of the proposal reviewed by The New York Times.

During the same Geneva meeting where the breast-feeding resolution was debated, the United States succeeded in removing statements supporting soda taxes from a document that advises countries grappling with soaring rates of obesity.

The Americans also sought, unsuccessfully, to thwart a W.H.O. effort aimed at helping poor countries obtain access to lifesaving medicines. Washington, supporting the pharmaceutical industry, has long resisted calls to modify patent laws as a way of increasing drug availability in the developing world, but health advocates say the Trump administration has ratcheted up its opposition to such efforts.

The delegation's actions in Geneva are in keeping with the tactics of an administration that has been upending alliances and long-established practices across a range of multilateral organizations, from the Paris climate accord to the Iran nuclear deal to NAFTA.

Ilona Kickbusch, director of the Global Health Centre at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, said there was a growing fear that the Trump administration could cause lasting damage to international health institutions like the W.H.O. that have been vital in containing epidemics like Ebola and the rising death toll from diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the developing world.

“It's making everyone very nervous, because if you can't agree on health multilateralism, what kind of multilateralism can you agree on?” Ms. Kickbusch asked.

A Russian delegate said the decision to introduce the breast-feeding resolution was a matter of principle.

“We're not trying to be a hero here, but we feel that it is wrong when a big country tries to push around some very small countries, especially on an issue that is really important for the rest of the world,” said the delegate, who asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

He said the United States did not directly pressure Moscow to back away from the measure. Nevertheless, the American delegation sought to wear down the other participants through procedural maneuvers in a series of meetings that stretched on for two days, an unexpectedly long period.


The opening of the World Health Assembly in May. After American officials pressured Ecuador, it was Russia that introduced a resolution in support of breast-feeding. — Photograph: Peter Klaunzer/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.
The opening of the World Health Assembly in May. After American officials pressured Ecuador, it was Russia that introduced a resolution
in support of breast-feeding. — Photograph: Peter Klaunzer/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.


In the end, the United States was largely unsuccessful. The final resolution preserved most of the original wording, though American negotiators did get language removed that called on the W.H.O. to provide technical support to member states seeking to halt “inappropriate promotion of foods for infants and young children.”

The United States also insisted that the words “evidence-based” accompany references to long-established initiatives that promote breast-feeding, which critics described as a ploy that could be used to undermine programs that provide parents with feeding advice and support.

Elisabeth Sterken, director of the Infant Feeding Action Coalition in Canada, said four decades of research have established the importance of breast milk, which provides essential nutrients as well as hormones and antibodies that protect newborns against infectious disease.

A 2016 study in The Lancet found that universal breast-feeding would prevent 800,000 child deaths a year across the globe and yield $300 billion in savings from reduced health care costs and improved economic outcomes for those reared on breast milk.

Scientists are loath to carry out double-blind studies that would provide one group with breast milk and another with breast milk substitutes. “This kind of ‘evidence-based’ research would be ethically and morally unacceptable,” Ms. Sterken said.

Abbott Laboratories, the Chicago-based company that is one of the biggest players in the $70 billion baby food market, declined to comment.

Nestlé, the Switzerland-based food giant with significant operations in the United States, sought to distance itself from the threats against Ecuador and said the company would continue to support the international code on the marketing of breast milk substitutes, which calls on governments to regulate the inappropriate promotion of such products and to encourage breast-feeding.

In addition to the trade threats, Todd C. Chapman, the United States ambassador to Ecuador, suggested in meetings with officials in Quito, the Ecuadorean capital, that the Trump administration might also retaliate by withdrawing the military assistance it has been providing in northern Ecuador, a region wracked by violence spilling across the border from Colombia, according to an Ecuadorean government official who took part in the meeting.

The United States Embassy in Quito declined to make Mr. Chapman available for an interview.

“We were shocked because we didn't understand how such a small matter like breast-feeding could provoke such a dramatic response,” said the Ecuadorean official, who asked not to be identified because she was afraid of losing her job.


__________________________________________________________________________

Wesley Tomaselli contributed reporting to this article from Colombia.

• Andrew Jacobs, a reporter with the Health and Science desk of The New York Times based in New York, previously reported from Beijing and Brazil. He also worked as a Metro reporter, with stints at the Style section and the National desk, covering the American South. His reporting for The N.Y. Times has included such varied topics as the presidential campaign, the aftermath of the earthquake in China and the lead up to the 2008 Summer Olympics. Before coming to The N.Y. Times, Mr. Jacobs spent a year teaching English in China, another year traveling around Asia and several years working odd jobs, including stints as an architectural preservationist, an English teacher and the sole reporter for such esteemed weekly newspapers as The Villager and the Brooklyn Phoenix (now extinct).  He was briefly employed as press secretary for New York City Council candidate Tom Duane, now a state senator.  He later edited such New York City weeklies as Our Town, Manhattan Spirit and The Chelsea-Clinton News.  A frustrated linguist, Mr. Jacobs speaks Mandarin, French, Spanish and diminishing amounts of Japanese, Portuguese and Italian.  His other passions include gentleman farming and landscaping design (activities which take place on a 135-acre farm in the Catskills). Mr. Jacobs is a 2011 Gerald Loeb Award finalist in the category of Breaking News for his work with Miguel Helft, John Markoff, Keith Bradsher, David Barboza, David E. Sanger and Brad Stone on “Google in China”. A native of New Jersey, Mr. Jacobs graduated in 1984 from New York University, where he majored in architectural history and urban design.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on July 9, 2018, on Page A1 of the New York print edition with the headline: “U.S. Delegation Disrupts Accord On Breast Milk”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • The Baby Is Getting Fed — but What?

 • Malnutrition and Obesity Coexist in Many Countries, Report Finds

 • Studies Offer Hope for Malnourished Children


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/08/health/world-health-breastfeeding-ecuador-trump.html

 46 
 on: July 09, 2018, 04:55:46 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

I can remember the days of the Tea Party and their nasty tactics in personally confronting politicians who supported Obama; and I can also remember Mitch McConnell cheering those Tea Party arseholes on.

So it's good to see that the same is being dished out to the likes of Mitch McConnell & co. Reap what you sowed, motherfuckers. Bring it on…




from The Washington Post…

‘Where are the babies, Mitch?’: McConnell
pursued from restaurant by angry crowd


“We know where you live!” someone shouted at the Senate
majority leader, before the small crowd turned on another man.


By AVI SELK | 4:40PM EDT — Sunday, July 08, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nopgmOiglA
A group of anti-ICE protesters confronted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(Republican-Kentucky) as he was leaving a restaurant in Louisville on July 7.


A GROUP of Democratic Socialists and other angry protesters pursued Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky) through a restaurant parking lot on Saturday, berating him with a mixture of immigration rhetoric and personal insults — and at one point an apparent threat to visit his home.

The Louisville encounter was the second time in two weeks that McConnell's private life has been disrupted by a spontaneous protest — and it was the latest in a weeks-long series of confrontations between powerful Republicans and those eager to shame them on camera, wherever they are found.

“If the Leader comments on being called a fascist and a supporter of ICE by a small handful of extremist protesters then I will let you know,” McConnell's spokesman, David Popp, wrote to The Washington Post after the incident.

McConnell — who supports the Trump administration's detention of families who illegally cross the border but opposed the president's short-lived policy of separating parents from their children — was having lunch on Saturday at Bristol Bar & Grille, in his hometown.

As it happened, hundreds of people were protesting outside Louisville's Immigration and Customs Enforcement Office, just a few miles from the restaurant. Among them were leaders of the local chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America, whose national fame has been growing since one of its members upset the Democratic incumbent in a New York congressional primary last month.

So when someone spotted McConnell at the restaurant and asked for help confronting him, the socialist group spread the word on social media.




And within a few minutes — just as happened in recent weeks with Trump's homeland security secretary, his press secretary, his Environmental Protection Agency administrator, and McConnell and his wife, Elaine Chao (who is also Trump's transportation secretary) in a separate incident — a scene was made outside the Bristol Bar & Grille.

At least half a dozen people, several with cameras, were waiting in front of the restaurant when McConnell walked out, with his checkered shirt tucked into his jeans and two dining companions at his side.

“Vote you out, vote you out!” the crowd began to chant.

“Where are the children?” one of them asked, not for the last time.

The three men didn't stop or slow, or even look at the crowd, though someone shouted “Go home!”

As McConnell's party turned a corner into the parking lot, a woman with an ankle-length dress and a backpack tried to block their path. She walked a step ahead of the Senate's top Republican, and the rest of the crowd followed close behind, still chanting and shouting.

“Where are the babies, Mitch?”

“Turtle head!”




The Democratic Socialists of Louisville told The Washington Post that three members were in the crowd, but said the group had nothing to do with the man who called the majority leader “turtle head” — and a few moments later shouted: “We know where you live, too, Mitch! We know where you live! Yeah! We know where you live, Mitch!”

“This person is not a DSA member, nor do we know who he is or what he meant by that statement,” the chapter wrote in an email. “We believe it is a reference to peacefully protesting in front of McConnell's house, which is a regular occurrence in Louisville. However, we cannot speak more to the comment because it did not come from our organization or our members.”

In any event, McConnell said nothing in reply; he simply climbed into the back seat of an SUV with a “Team Mitch” sticker on the window. The two other men (one of them a top state Republican, according to the Courier-Journal) got into the front, and the protesters could only shout at them as the engine fired up.

“Abolish ICE, abolish ICE!” they chanted.

“No justice, no peace!”

“No comfort for fascists!” said the man who called McConnell a “turtle head.”

“We did good, fellow citizens,” a man told the rest of the group as the Highlander backed out of its parking space.

And true enough, video of the impromptu protest would be seen by hundreds of thousands of people, make national news and be praised by those on the left who think Trump's allies deserve no peaceful meals while hundreds of migrant children are still being held from their parents.




But not everyone thought so.

As McConnell's SUV left the parking lot, one of the videographers turned around to see a red convertible idling behind them, its driver glaring.

“Let them live their lives,” the man said as he pulled up beside the group. “It's none of your f---ing business.”

A few of the protesters stopped chanting after the departed majority leader and turned on this driver who would dare confront the confronters.

“What a potty mouth!” a woman behind a camera jeered. “Keep on talking, fella, you're going to be a star.”

Like McConnell, the man in the convertible made no reply. He soon left the parking lot, too, accompanied by indistinguishable angry screams.


__________________________________________________________________________

Avi Selk worked for many years in factories and service industries — experiences he values. He later graduated from the University of Texas at Austin's journalism program in 2009, then worked for the Dallas Morning News until 2016, when The Washington Post hired him. He reports for the general assignment desk.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Why a teacher carried her 2-year-old up to Scott Pruitt's restaurant table and asked him to resign

 • The owner of the Red Hen explains why she asked Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2018/07/08/where-are-the-babies-mitch-mcconnell-pursued-from-restaurant-by-angry-crowd

 47 
 on: July 08, 2018, 11:47:25 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Rebels surrender in Syria's south

Government troops declare victory, and move toward opening a key border crossing.

By NABIH BULOS | Sunday, July 08, 2018

Soldiers brandish the state flag at Syria's Nassib crossing on the southern border with Jordan, the latest victory for the government. — Photograph: Youssef Badawi/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.
Soldiers brandish the state flag at Syria's Nassib crossing on the southern border with Jordan, the latest victory for the government.
 — Photograph: Youssef Badawi/European Pressphoto Agency/Shutterstock.


AMMAN, JORDAN — It was little more than three years ago when rebels stormed the Nassib crossing on Syria's southern border with Jordan. They rampaged through administrative buildings, ripping down the Syrian state flag and stomping on pictures of President Bashar Assad.

At the time, it was seen as yet another loss for a government on the verge of downfall, its battered troops in desperate retreat across the country.

On Friday, soldiers raised the state flag once again over Nassib, the state-run Syrian Arab News Agency reported, in the run-up to a full cease-fire and the surrender of the rebels' enclave in the southern province of Dara.

The victory further cements a Russian-engineered turnaround for Assad, which has handed him back control over what the French once called “La Syrie utile” — the string of major cities running from Aleppo down past Damascus and the country's Mediterranean coastline.

It also clears the path for reopening the Nassib crossing, an important economic passageway whose loss had impoverished both Syria and Jordan.

SANA posted images on its Telegram channel on Saturday of soldiers flashing victory signs as they waved a flag over one building. Others showed stacks of ammunition and armored vehicles abandoned by the rebels.

It reported the Syrian army had also captured a number of border outposts east of Nassib and had already “shut down all illegal crossings and smuggling and supply routes for the terrorist groups,” employing the government's routine term for the opposition.

Over the last two weeks, the skies over the south had been crowded with Russian and Syrian warplanes conducting hundreds of airstrikes on the rebels' bastion, which at its zenith covered approximately two-thirds of Dara as well as the neighboring province of Quneitra under the control of Western-backed factions as well as jihadists from Al Qaeda and Islamic State.

The strikes were the usual prelude to the ground offensives that had seen other opposition enclaves fall over the last two years.

With some 320,000 already displaced since June 19 and lacking support from their Western and regional backers, the rebels announced on Friday that they had accepted a deal for a gradual handover of weapons and territory.

Most of the displaced had fled to Dara's border with Jordan and to neighboring Quneitra province near the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, whipped by desert winds and temperatures that could soar above 110 degrees Fahrenheit.

At least 15 people couldn't endure the severe conditions; the U.N.'s coordination office for humanitarian affairs said they had died in areas close to the Jordanian border due to “scorpion bites, dehydration and diseases transmitted through contaminated water.”

Both Jordan and Israel had refused to let the refugees in, though they did allow aid to be delivered.

Some 20,000 civilians had begun returning to their homes on Friday evening, according to the pro-opposition watchdog the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

Other rebel media activists said they had instead been transferred to the town of Busra al Sham under the stewardship of Shabab al Sunnah, an opposition faction that was now working with the government.

The agreement, SANA said, stipulates the rebels give up their heavy and medium weaponry.

Insurgents willing to lay down their arms and live under Assad's rule can join amnesty deals, and those who left their military service would be reintegrated into the army within six months.

As in previous iterations, those who refuse will be bused to rebel-held areas in the north.

All observation points along the border with Jordan would be handed back to government control, while state institutions and services would be restored. Residents could also return to their homes with Russian military police acting as guarantors of their safety.

But rebel spokesmen insisted government troops would not be allowed in the area, which would instead be secured by a local force composed of former rebel fighters working under the Russian police. The army, they said, would also withdraw from the more than 30 villages it had taken in the latest offensive.

At the time of writing, the army had not withdrawn and there were reports from a number of rebel activists of widespread looting by government forces.

The rebel surrender clears the way for a government offensive on Quneitra, a volatile region with jihadis bunkered in a corner of territory between Syria, Israel and Jordan.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Nabih Bulos is a special correspondent to the Los Angeles Times.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=6d7ab03e-7ac3-4fff-85e6-eb88025474b1

 48 
 on: July 08, 2018, 04:35:51 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 49 
 on: July 08, 2018, 04:29:53 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 50 
 on: July 08, 2018, 03:38:05 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times....

Trump's trade policy

Trump's trade policy is a relic of 19th century economic thinking.

By DAVID HORSEY | 4:39PM PDT — Friday, July 07, 2018



PRESIDENT TRUMP's impulse to slap tariffs on every major trading partner is reminiscent of America's trade debates in the 1800's. When William McKinley, a long-time advocate of tariffs, became president in 1896, he quickly realized how counter-productive tariffs could be in an age when products from the United States were beginning to flood world markets. McKinley wisely reversed course. In today's global economy, imposing tariffs and engaging in trade wars is even more self defeating, but Trump forges ahead with his antiquated policies, in the process damaging relations with long-time allies, such as Canada and Europe. Soon, they will also prove damaging to American exporters and workers.

__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/trumps-trade-policy

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6 7 8 9 10
Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.156 seconds with 15 queries.