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 31 
 on: May 05, 2020, 10:09:27 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 32 
 on: May 04, 2020, 10:19:01 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 33 
 on: May 03, 2020, 04:32:17 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Military jets salute workers on front line as more
coronavirus cases and deaths are reported


The Washington D.C. region confirmed 103 additional covid-19 fatalities on Saturday.

By FENIT NIRAPPIL, SAMANTHA SCHMIDT and MICHAEL E. RUANE | 6:13PM EDT — Saturday, May 02, 2020

The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over the Washington region on Saturday in a salute to front-line covid-19 responders. — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over the Washington region on Saturday in a salute to front-line covid-19 responders.
 — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.


AS military jets streaked overhead in salute to covid-19 first responders, the District, Maryland and Virginia reported 103 additional coronavirus deaths on Saturday, bringing the regional death toll to 2,107.

The increases in fatalities and cases have been on par with daily rises over the past week.

Maryland disclosed 59 more deaths and 1,001 newly confirmed cases. In all, Maryland has reported 1,251 confirmed and probable deaths from covid-19, the disease the novel coronavirus causes, and 24,473 confirmed cases.

Virginia added 35 deaths and 830 more cases. Virginia has 616 confirmed and probable fatalities and nearly 18,000 cases.

The District disclosed nine additional deaths and 139 newly positive test results. The nation's capital has nearly 4,800 cases and has lost 240 residents to the virus.


Spectators turned out on the front of the Lincoln Memorial to watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds. — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.
Spectators turned out on the front of the Lincoln Memorial to watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds.
 — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly over the city, past the Washington Monument and the House of Representatives, to honor medical workers during the covid-19 pandemic, in Washington, D.C. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly over the city, past the Washington Monument and the House of Representatives, to honor medical
workers during the covid-19 pandemic, in Washington, D.C. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds are seen during a flyover to salute frontline covid-19 responders in Arlington, Virginia. — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds are seen during a flyover to salute frontline covid-19 responders in Arlington, Virginia.
 — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.


People watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds, perform a joint flyover near the Washington Monument. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds, perform a joint flyover near the Washington Monument.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


Meanwhile, across sunny skies, the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds jet demonstration teams criss-crossed the area in tribute to those on the front lines of the pandemic.

On the Mall and along the Georgetown waterfront, among other places, people gathered in the pleasant spring weather to watch, as the 12 jets left twisting white contrails against the blue sky.

Elsewhere, a modest crowd of “Reopen Maryland” protesters staged a rolling demonstration from Frederick to Salisbury to pressure Maryland Governor Larry Hogan (Republican) to lift restrictions imposed to contain the pandemic.

The protest and car caravan began at Francis Scott Key Mall in Frederick and proceeded to Salisbury, where people were addressed by Representative Andy Harris (Republican), who voiced his support.

Few wore masks. Many wore yellow “Reopen Maryland” T-shirts, which had been handed out in Frederick. One man wore a T-shirt that read, “Tyranny Response Team”.

The group wants to reverse the economic standstill caused by efforts to slow the virus, and protesters called for the reopening of schools and houses of worship, saying the measures are too broad and socially destructive.


People record the flyover with their phones. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People record the flyover with their phones. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

Spectators near Columbia Heights in the District watch the jets Saturday. — Photograph: Oliver Contreras/for The Washington Post.
Spectators near Columbia Heights in the District watch the jets Saturday. — Photograph: Oliver Contreras/for The Washington Post.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” Harris said to those assembled at a Salisbury mall around 2:30 p.m. “I can't go to church on Sunday. Because, unbelievably in America, I have been told that you can't practice your religion.”

“And the state has decided if my religion is essential or non-essential,” he said, according to a feed from WBOC-TV in Salisbury.

“I didn't wake up in Communist China. I didn't wake up in North Korea this morning. And tomorrow morning, I should be able to go to the church of my choice.”

“I am a physician,” Harris added. “Let me tell you something: It is safe to begin to reopen Maryland…. There are not 2 million people going to die in the United States. In Maryland, the estimate would have been 20,000 to 40,000 people dying.”

The crowd chanted, “Open it up! Open it up!”


Spectators on the steps of the Library of Congresss watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly in formation over the city. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.
Spectators on the steps of the Library of Congresss watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly in formation over the city.
 — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.


People watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds at the Lincoln Memorial. — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.
People watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds at the Lincoln Memorial.
 — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels, and theThunderbirds fly over Washington D.C. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels, and theThunderbirds fly over Washington D.C. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

Heather, Ryan, and Sawyer Zempel, 5, watch the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
Heather, Ryan, and Sawyer Zempel, 5, watch the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

But others in the area disagreed.

“Everybody wants to get back to normal,” said Amy K. Liebman, director of environmental and occupational health for the Migrant Clinicians Network office in Salisbury. “Everyone would love to see a reopened Maryland.”

“But we're not ready,” she said on Saturday.

Covid-19 cases have risen sharply in the past two weeks in the Salisbury area, which is home to the Eastern Shore's large chicken industry.

“We need to see it going in the other direction before we start taking measures to reopen,” Liebman said. “That really includes someone standing up for the workers who are fueling our local economy.”

“How do we reopen at the same time that all of our essential workers are fully protected?” she said.


People walk around and exercise on the National Mall after the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People walk around and exercise on the National Mall after the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

The workforce in the area's chicken processing plants is made up of many Hispanic, Haitian and African American employees, she said.

“I am very concerned about the workers who are on our front lines here, those who are scared, those who desperately need to earn a paycheck,” she said. “If you skim the racial breakdown of our [covid-19] cases, it's disproportionately impacting Latino and Hispanic workers.”

“What we need to be looking at is, how can these workers work safely?” she added. “What changes need to take place? And what do they need to be provided?”

Safe distancing in the chicken plants needs to be enforced, Liebman said. Ventilation should be checked, reliable protective gear should be provided, and testing should be extensive.

“What we need to ensure is that we reopen safely and that we don't cause more people to get sick and some people to die,” she said.


__________________________________________________________________________

Teddy Amenabar and Sam Mallon contributed to this report.

Fenit Nirappil covers D.C. government and politics for The Washington Post's local politics team. Before moving to the D.C. beat, he was part of a team of reporters covering the governor's race and other elections in Virginia. Since joining The Post in 2015, he has written stories across the Washington region spanning breaking news, campaigns and government accountability. Nirappil was educated at Northwestern University where he earned a B.S. in journalism and political science; and at American University where he was awarded a M.S.J. in journalism.

Samantha Schmidt is a reporter focused on gender and family issues for The Washington Post. She previously worked on The Post's Morning Mix team, and as a reporting fellow for The New York Times. Educated at Indiana University, Schmidt was awarded a B.A. in journalism and Arabic. She speaks fluent Spanish and Arabic.

Michael E. Ruane is a general assignment reporter at The Washington Post who also covers Washington institutions and historical topics. He has been a general assignment reporter at the Philadelphia Bulletin, an urban affairs and state feature writer at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and a Pentagon correspondent at Knight Ridder newspapers. He was part of The Washington Post team which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting and he is also co-author with Sari Horowitz of the book Sniper: Inside the Hunt for the Killers Who Terrorized the Nation. Ruane holds a B.A. and M.A. in istory from Villanova University; and he is a Nieuman fellow at Harvard University.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over D.C.

 • Smallest caseload to biggest death toll: Coronavirus decimates D.C.'s poorest ward

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over D.C. area


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/military-jets-salute-workers-on-the-front-line-of-the-pandemic-as-more-covid-cases-and-deaths-are-reported/2020/05/02/e8049ca2-8c74-11ea-9dfd-990f9dcc71fc_story.html

 34 
 on: May 02, 2020, 09:31:12 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 35 
 on: May 02, 2020, 01:57:44 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times…

How we got here: One country, several nations

The way we confront today's societal choices — right down to who we choose for president
in November — depends on which collection of American nations prevail over the rest.


By DAVID HORSEY | 3:08PM PDT — Friday, May 01, 2020



WASHINGTON, OREGON and CALIFORNIA have banded together to coordinate policies for dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, as have states in the Northeast. Meanwhile, several states in the South and the Mountain West have gone rogue, relaxing social distancing rules and allowing massage parlors, barbershops, bowling alleys and beaches to open up for business.

It is easy to interpret these contrasting approaches merely as red states and blues states running off in predictably opposite directions. However, the way regions of the country have responded differently to the current national health crisis may be evidence of enduring cultural values that go far deeper — as far back as the first colonies in North America and even to the English Civil War.

In his 2011 book, American Nations: A History of the Eleven Regional Cultures of North America journalist and historian Colin Woodard notes that the United States is not just one big, homogenous cultural lump. Similarly, journalist Joel Garreau wrote in The Nine Nations of North America, the continent could easily be divided into nine distinct countries, including a cohesive coastal society running from San Francisco up through Seattle to Vancouver and beyond. Garreau called that elongated land Ecotopia. Woodard identifies the same area as the Left Coast, but he takes his premise beyond Garreau's observations into recurring patterns of history.

Woodard's central premise is that the founding cultures that colonized North America have not vanished in the American melting pot. By his reckoning, the diverse philosophies and ways of organizing society that guided European settlers as they established communities in the New World still drive powerful undercurrents in our fractured federation.

In our time, we are experiencing one bitter political clash after another — about the right to bear arms versus the right to safety in public spaces; about tightening borders versus welcoming immigrants; about protecting property and wealth versus extending health care and a living wage to all; and, yes, about employing the coercive powers of government to save lives in the middle of a pandemic versus risking those lives so that businesses can stay open and individuals can roam free. If Woodard's premise is right, those searing debates and many more are merely the latest manifestations of a long historical dynamic. The way we confront today's societal choices — right down to who we choose for president in November — depends on which collection of American nations prevail over the rest.

The oldest of Woodard's “nations” is El Norte, the borderlands of northern Mexico and the United States, where descendants of Spanish conquerors and indigenous people are now a resurgent political force from California to Texas.

New Amsterdam's obsession with commerce and openness to people of all ethnicities and religions in the 1600s is still the hallmark of New York City, an urban nation Woodard calls New Netherland.

The often belligerent, individualistic, independent spirit that lowland Scots and Scots-Irish immigrants brought from the violent borderlands of the British Isles to the 18th-century American frontier remains potent in Greater Appalachia, a region that runs from West Virginia along either side of the Ohio River and down into northern Texas — a cantankerous spirit that shows up at any gathering of NRA members or Tea Party patriots.

In the nation Woodard calls the Midlands, the live-and-let-live attitude of William Penn's 17th-century colony has been sustained in political swing states from Pennsylvania into the Midwest heartland.

The once-influential nation of Tidewater, composed of Maryland, Delaware and the eastern halves of North Carolina and Virginia, was founded by royalist Cavaliers who took the side of the king in the English Civil War. Today, the region's long political alliance with the rest of South has faded; Tidewater has joined the Obama coalition.

Most enduring through the course of American history has been the rivalry between two very different nations: the Deep South and Yankeedom.

The Deep South came into being when wealthy English slave owners relocated from the Caribbean to Charleston, South Carolina. They were an aristocratic elite who believed in their God-given right to rule and prosper on the backs of enslaved Africans and poorer whites. Over decades, their slave society spread through the Gulf Coast states into Texas. Even when crushed by Yankee armies in the Civil War, their racist, hierarchical system was reconstituted and prevailed well into the 20th century.

Does the callousness of the old slave masters reverberate in the actions of the current governor of Georgia? His rush to reopen businesses disregards the threat to disadvantaged black communities where the coronavirus is particularly lethal.

Yankeedom arose from Puritan New England. Having overthrown a king in their homeland and governed through Parliament until the Cavaliers forcibly restored the English monarchy, the Puritans were on a mission to create a more righteous society in virgin territory. Over time, their intolerant religious beliefs fell away. What remained was a conviction that society could be made better by the earnest efforts of well-educated, free-and-equal citizens working together for the common good.

During the American Revolution, Yankees allied with the slaveholding leaders of Tidewater, but thereafter, as the Deep South agitated to extend slavery to new states in the West, abolition-minded New Englanders were themselves tempted to secede from the union.

Yankee culture expanded into the upper Midwest and eventually sailed into the San Francisco Bay, the Willamette River Valley and Puget Sound. Though far from being a majority on the West Coast, Yankees were cultural and political leaders who encouraged education, entrepreneurship and devotion to civic duty. Even the old Puritan dream of creating a more perfect world echoed in the Left Coast's latter-day utopian dreams, from the hippies of Haight-Ashbury to Earth Day environmentalism.

Politically, the Left Coast has long allied with the Yankees of the Northeast and the Upper Midwest. Well into the 1970s, Washington's Republican Party leadership was in sync with the GOP progressives of Massachusetts and New York. However, once the state's Republicans began to realign with a national GOP increasingly dominated by the Deep South, they began to lose elections. It has now been 40 years since a Republican was elected governor in Washington.

It has also been a long time since a Democrat has found favor on the east side of the Cascades. In 1994, voters ousted two Democrats representing the region in Congress — Speaker of the House Tom Foley and a young freshman named Jay Inslee. Woodard describes Eastern Washington as part of another nation, the Far West, a vast area long exploited by eastern industrial interests where an abiding resentment of the federal government is dominant. Is it any surprise then that, in Left Coast Seattle, business leaders have rallied in good Yankee fashion to support hospitals and Governor Inslee's social distancing measures while, over the mountains in the “Far West” counties of Benton and Franklin, officials have tried to defy Inslee's stay-at-home orders?

When we wonder why Americans seem so disunited, even in the midst of a pandemic that threatens us all, the answer may be simple: We are one country composed of several nations that have seldom seen things eye to eye.


__________________________________________________________________________

David Horsey is a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for The Seattle Times. During a break from working for The Seattle Times for a few years, he created cartoons for the Los Angeles Times.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/how-we-got-here-one-country-several-nations

 36 
 on: May 02, 2020, 01:16:32 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times…

You can't make this stuff up, folks

Trump is pushing the limits of political satire.

By DAVID HORSEY | 11:37AM PDT — Friday, May 01, 2020



SINCE first becoming a contender for the presidency in 2015, President Donald Trump has been a gushing fount of inspiration for political cartoonists, late-night TV hosts and the entire comedy industry. His bizarre public pronouncements; his toxic-tweet flurries; his malevolent, mendacious persona; and his coterie of sycophants, mediocrities and right-wing weirdos provide so much material for satire that people assume this is a golden age for those of us who make a living making fun of the powers that be.

The truth, though, is that Trump gives us far too much to work with. The specialty of political cartoonists, in particular, has always been to take note of the flaws and foolishness of the movers and shakers in society and to exaggerate those elements to create edgy, jugular art that declares to any who will listen that “the emperor has no clothes”. But what does a satirist do when the emperor very proudly boasts about being naked?

Or, more specifically, what can be said in a cartoon about a president who, on live television, suggests that a cure for COVID-19 might be achieved if people ingest disinfectant and expose their innards to light? How can any cartoon get more exaggerated or more shockingly weird than that?

Cartooning Trump has become a mere act of illustration, not comedic exaggeration. Trump cannot be cartooned; he is a cartoon.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/you-cant-make-this-stuff-up-folks

 37 
 on: May 02, 2020, 12:47:53 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times…

No crowning achievements

Trump is no tyrant, just a big-talking incompetent.

By DAVID HORSEY | 11:30AM PDT — Friday, May 01, 2020



LIBERALS who have long been freaking out about President Donald Trump's authoritarian rhetoric should relax. Trump really doesn't want to be king; he just wants to play one on TV.

The current global crisis driven by the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed Trump at his most bombastic and most feeble. One the one hand, he has loudly asserted that as president he has “total authority” and can order state governors to do his bidding and even shut down Congress if he is so inclined. On the other hand, he has run away from making the hard choices a capable leader must make, leaving it to governors and mayors to create their own plans to get safety gear to hospitals and organize the kind of comprehensive testing program that is imperative before the economy can be revived. He is all talk and no action.

The good news, if there is any, is that Trump is a fake tyrant. The bad news is that he is also a fake president who shuns the difficult duties of his job.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/no-crowning-achievements

 38 
 on: May 01, 2020, 09:34:42 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 39 
 on: April 30, 2020, 09:49:05 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 40 
 on: April 29, 2020, 10:07:30 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



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