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 31 
 on: August 18, 2019, 03:59:59 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

So … tell me … what does it feel like being Woodville's village idiot? 

 32 
 on: August 18, 2019, 03:29:17 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Fuck, you're a stupid queer cunt.

You are gaga … lost the plot … mentally-ill … fucked-in-the-head … just like your dumbarse hero, Donald J. Trump.

The good folks of Woodville must piss themselves with laughter every time they catch sight of you.

You are most definitely their village idiot.

 33 
 on: August 18, 2019, 03:02:28 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

As opposed to allowing Australia to fuck them in the arse?

Fuck, you're a stupid moron sometimes.

I'm going to laugh when global-warming induced climate change causes a huge flood through Woodville and wipes out your house.

 34 
 on: August 18, 2019, 01:52:37 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
yes why not let china fuck all those island people in the arse

 35 
 on: August 18, 2019, 01:49:09 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants



 36 
 on: August 18, 2019, 01:46:32 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Yep … America is definitely the laughing stock of the entire world.

Who'd have ever thought they would end up with such a clown as their president, eh?


 37 
 on: August 18, 2019, 12:12:00 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 38 
 on: August 18, 2019, 12:08:29 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey





from The Washington Post…

Trump seems to have lost it. So what do we do?

The president is paralyzed and confused.

By JENNIFER RUBIN | 1:45PM EDT — Friday, August 16, 2019

Icebergs are seen from the window of a plane carrying NASA scientists on a mission to track melting ice in eastern Greenland on August 14. — Photograph: Mstyslav Chernov/Associated Press.
Icebergs are seen from the window of a plane carrying NASA scientists on a mission to track melting ice in eastern Greenland on August 14.
 — Photograph: Mstyslav Chernov/Associated Press.


THE WASHINGTON POST reports that there is no Trump administration plan in the event of a recession: "Trump has a somewhat conspiratorial view, telling some confidants that he distrusts statistics he sees reported in the news media and that he suspects many economists and other forecasters are presenting biased data to thwart his re-election.” (Next, he'll be ranting about strawberries.)

If you think that's frightful, consider another Washington Post report: “Trump has pushed top aides to investigate whether the U.S. government can purchase the giant ice-smothered island of Greenland.” As one might expect, “The presidential request has bewildered aides, some of whom continue to believe it isn't serious, but Trump has mentioned it for weeks.”

Greenland is part of the kingdom of Denmark, and last time I looked it wasn't on the market. (What would the comps be?) In case you thought the wall was an expensive boondoggle, imagine what a pretty penny it would cost to buy a country of “2.2 million square kilometers, with 1.7 million of that covered in ice.” (Yes, after World War II, the Truman administration tried to buy it, but it didn't amount to anything and no serious person thinks Denmark is going to sell part of its kingdom to us.)

Sure, this is humorous, but it also frightening. We have no idea why this particular Trump obsession has taken hold or why someone — his secretary of state, perhaps — has not told him that this is silly, a waste of aides' time and evidence of Trump's unfitness as commander in chief. It is, after all. And whoever leaked this to the media seems to have understood the necessity of halting this behavior and, more important, grappling with his unhinged conduct.

We are facing a possible recession, brought on by Trump's ignorant trade war. Trump has made hash out of relations with allies, sabotaged bipartisan support for Israel, been snookered by Kim Jong Un, refused to take interest in securing our elections from Russian interference and exacerbated a border crisis by cutting off aid to three Central American countries We have a wave of white nationalist violence, for which a large majority of Americans think he is at least somewhat to blame. And Trump frets about Greenland.

Alarm bells should have been ringing long ago about this president's fitness. Trump's inability to distinguish facts from lies (more than 12,000 of them); his obsession with (and exaggeration of) his 2016 victory, which renders him unwilling to recognize Russia intervened to help him; his incoherent speech pattern and tweets; his refusal to read briefing materials; his impulsive moves and personal attacks on perceived enemies; and his affection for and manipulation by foreign dictators collectively suggest that he is not fit to work in the White House, let alone to be president. (Should the military obey a first-strike order from this guy?)

One would hope that former advisers, including James Mattis, H.R. McMaster, Rex Tillerson, Dan Coats and Gary Cohn, as well as the few remaining independent voices in the administration (FBI Director Christopher Wray, CIA Director Gina Haspel), would understand the necessity of advising Congress and the American people if they have concerns that the president is unfit.

Don't get your hopes up about the 25th Amendment, however. We have no reason to think members of his Cabinet and Vice President Pence would have the character and good judgment to activate its terms.

Nevertheless, Trump's behavior should give the House, already down the road on an impeachment inquiry, a sense of urgency. If the president has committed High Crimes & Misdemeanors and is also unfit, shouldn't Congress be speeding things up? If evidence from Donald McGahn and others prove compelling on obstruction of justice and the economy sinks into recession, the Republican-led Senate might just take an impeachment trial seriously, or at the very least, urge him to resign or declare that he won't run for re-election.

In the meantime, the media and Congress should stop pretending Trump is fit to govern. He's not. He needs to go as soon as possible, by whatever legal or electoral means possible.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jennifer Rubin writes reported opinion from a center-right perspective for The Washington Post. She covers a range of domestic and foreign policy issues and provides insight into the conservative movement, the Republican Party and threats to Western democracies. Rubin, who is also an MSNBC contributor, came to The Post after three years with Commentary magazine. Prior to her career in journalism, Rubin practiced labor law for two decades, an experience that informs and enriches her work. She is a mother of two sons and lives in Northern Virginia.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • REUTERS VIDEO: Trump ridiculed for “trying to buy” Greenland


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/08/16/trump-seems-have-lost-it-so-what-do-we-do

 39 
 on: August 18, 2019, 12:00:47 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

North Korea spits out insults, launches missiles and rejects talks with South

The latest volley of vitriol underlines how far from peace the Korean Peninsula is, as diplomatic detente stumbles.

By SIMON DENYER | 4:57AM EDT — Friday, August 16, 2019

People at a Seoul train station on Friday watch a TV news program about Pyongyang's missile tests, showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. — Photograph: Lee Jin-Man/Associated Press.
People at a Seoul train station on Friday watch a TV news program about Pyongyang's missile tests, showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.
 — Photograph: Lee Jin-Man/Associated Press.


TOKYO — North Korea spat out insults at South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday, rejected the idea of dialogue with Seoul and launched two more missiles into the sea, in the latest display of rage at joint U.S.-South Korea military exercises.

The volley of saber-rattling was another slap in the face for Moon, who spoke optimistically in a Liberation Day speech a day earlier of his plans to “solidify denuclearization” of North Korea, initiate a “peace economy” and lay the foundations for the unification of the Korean Peninsula by 2045.

While North Korea has not closed the door to dialogue with the United States, its anger dampens expectations that Washington and Pyongyang can make meaningful progress in nuclear talks. Meanwhile, although Moon's relentlessly rosy view of relations with the North has helped smooth the path to dialogue, experts say his approach looks increasingly unrealistic.

“We will advance dialogue and cooperation so that seeds sown together with North Korea in the spring of peace will grow into trees of prosperity,” Moon said on Thursday, gliding over the continued sanctions on North Korea and the absence of steps by the regime to dismantle its nuclear program.

Pyongyang's response: its sixth missile launch in a little over three weeks and a barrage of insults at Moon over the military exercises whose aim, it said, was to annihilate its army.

“His open talk about ‘dialogue’ between the north and the south under such situation raises a question as to whether he has proper thinking faculty,” Pyongyang said in a statement from an unnamed spokesperson for its Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Country. “He is, indeed, an impudent guy rare to be found.”

The statement, released by the Korean Central News Agency, also complained about drones and fighters purchased from the United States, and about plans announced this week to upgrade South Korea's missile capabilities.

“What is clear is that all of them are aimed at destroying the DPRK,” the statement said, referring to the country's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Pyongyang says the exercises break promises made by Moon and President Trump.

But experts say its petulance has been encouraged by Trump, who has defended Pyongyang's right to test missiles, denigrated Moon and indicated his own opposition to the military exercises because he believes they are costing the United States too much.

North Korea resumed testing short-range ballistic missiles after the breakdown of the Hanoi summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un at the end of February. Security analysts say the Kim regime has used the tests to significantly improve its ability to attack South Korea and penetrate its missile defense shield. In particular, the North's KN-23 missile is designed to fly fast and low, making it particularly tough to detect and intercept, the analysts say.

South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said it had observed two “projectiles” that flew about 140 miles up to an altitude of nearly 20 miles and appeared to be “short-range ballistic missiles,” although further analysis would be needed to confirm if they were the same as those launched previously.

Pyongyang's message was clear: Moon has no right to talk about peace while conducting military exercises. It called him a “mouse”, a “funny man” who only reads what his junior staff have written for him, and someone who gets “shocked into fright even by the sound of a sporting gun” going off in the North.

In April, Kim warned that the United States needed to change its approach if it wanted to make progress in nuclear talks, and gave Washington until the end of the year to come up with new proposals.

“I think the missile tests are designed to pressure Trump to make a better offer,” said Robert Kelly, a professor of international relations at Pusan National University in South Korea. “And Trump pretty clearly wants to.”

Kelly said Trump wants a deal he can sell to Fox News and his voters as a foreign policy triumph, even if it damages U.S. alliances in Asia, but he is surrounded by people such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and national security adviser John Bolton who take harder-line positions.

In an interview with Voice of America this week, Bolton insisted that Washington would not be fooled. He said the United States wanted to see North Korea make a “clear strategic decision to give up its nuclear weapons and its delivery systems,” and then implement that decision.

“The pattern of North Korea leadership before Kim Jong Un is that they would make modest concessions on their nuclear program in exchange for tangible economic benefits,” Bolton said.

“And then once they had used those economic benefits — rescued their economy, stabilized leadership — they would fail to honor their own commitments on the nuclear side,” he told VOA. “If they think that they can do that again, I think they're making a big mistake.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tokyo, covering Japan and the Koreas. He served previously as bureau chief in China, and in India; a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, New Delhi, Islamabad and Kabul; and as a Reuters correspondent in Nairobi, New York and London. He is author of Rogue Elephant: Harnessing the Power of India's Unruly Democracy, and the co-editor of Foreign Correspondent: Fifty Years of Reporting South Asia. He has also made frequent TV and radio appearances, including on BBC, CNN, NPR, PBS, Fox News, MSNBC, CNBC and Sky News, as well as India's NDTV, Times Now and CNN-IBN. Denyer holds a MA with honors in economics from Trinity College.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/north-korea-spits-out-insults-launches-missiles-and-rejects-talks-with-south/2019/08/16/091fb920-bfd0-11e9-a8b0-7ed8a0d5dc5d_story.html

 40 
 on: August 17, 2019, 10:14:56 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Fast, low and hard to stop: North Korea's
missile tests crank up the threat level


Kim Jong Un has used a pause in the talks process — and a green light
from Trump — to significantly raise the danger his military poses.


By SIMON DENYER | 4:52AM EDT — Thursday, August 15, 2019

North Korea test-fires a new weapon, seen here in a picture released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency this month. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Kashmir News Service/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
North Korea test-fires a new weapon, seen here in a picture released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency this month.
 — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Kashmir News Service/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


TOKYO — President Trump has brushed off North Korea's resumption of missile launches, but the volley of tests in the past four months has significantly raised the country's military capabilities and the threat they pose to South Korea and U.S. forces on the peninsula, experts say.

On Friday, North Korea fired two “unidentified projectiles” into the sea, according to South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff, its sixth test since July 25. It also carried out two tests in May.

The launches have included at least two new types of short-range ballistic missiles and a mobile launcher that can fire multiple rockets. Pyongyang also has shown off a submarine that may be intended to carry nuclear warheads.

Trump says he has been told that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “only smiles when he sees me.” But photos released by North Korean state media show the dictator beaming from cheek to cheek at the successful tests.

“There's no question that the 2019 testing campaign that began in April has showcased some quite serious qualitative advancement in North Korean missile capabilities,” said Ankit Panda, an adjunct senior fellow in the Defense Posture Project at the Federation of American Scientists. “The core theme across all of the new weapons seems to be survivability, responsiveness and missile-defense defeat.”

The weapons that North Korea has showcased, including a road-mobile short-range ballistic missile known as the KN-23, with a range of at least 280 miles, appear designed specifically to confound South Korea's missile-defense system.

“The three missiles have several things in common: They are solid fuel, they are mobile, they are fast, they fly low, and at least the KN-23 can maneuver in-flight, which is very impressive,” said Vipin Narang, an associate professor of political science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“Any one of the missiles would pose a challenge to regional and [South Korean] missile defenses given these characteristics. Together, they pose a nightmare.”

On Wednesday, South Korea's Defense Ministry announced that it would raise defense spending by an average of more than 7 percent a year for the next five years, with money set aside to improve its radar detection and missile capabilities, to “secure ample interception capabilities against new types of ballistic missiles North Korea has recently test-fired.”

South Korea's missile-defense system was primarily built around the threat posed by North Korea's older, comparatively clumsier Scud-class missiles. It includes U.S.-made mobile Patriot and PAC-3 missiles, the sea-based Aegis system and the land-based Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system.

No system is impregnable, but North Korea's new missiles appear designed to find one of the biggest gaps in Seoul's armor.

Traditional ballistic missiles fly in an arc that takes them out of Earth's atmosphere. But the KN-23, which appears similar to the Russian Iskander missile, took a lower trajectory, spending much of its flight at an altitude of 25 to 30 miles — potentially too high for the Patriot batteries, but too low for THAAD and Aegis systems to easily intercept.

Ferenc Dalnoki-Veress, scientist-in-residence at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, California, said a ballistic missile flies in a predictable arc defined by gravity, just like a baseball thrown high into the air, making it easier to catch. The KN-23 is like a knuckleball — fast, low, unpredictable and almost impossible to catch.

That the latest missiles are solid-fueled makes them easier to deploy and fire on short notice: Liquid fuel is corrosive and less stable, and it has to be added to a missile just before launch, a process that can give an adversary vital warning. Solid-fuel rockets, mounted as these have been on vehicles, can be hidden, moved around at will and launched quickly, making them almost impossible to take out before they are fired.


North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, seated, supervises the test-fire of a new weapon at an undisclosed location, in a photo released by North Korean state media earlier in August. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Kashmir News Service/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, seated, supervises the test-fire of a new weapon at an undisclosed location, in a photo released by North Korean
state media earlier in August. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Kashmir News Service/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Although North Korea may not be able to miniaturize a nuclear warhead sufficiently to attach it to a missile such as the KN-23, conventional warheads that hit South Korean nuclear power plants could be devastating, experts say.

“I hope nuclear warheads will never be affixed to the KN-23, but if they are, it will be impossible for a threatened country to discriminate between an incoming nuke or high-explosive,” said Melissa Hanham, a missile expert at the One Earth Future Foundation. “This leads to a very destabilizing dynamic that will likely lead to escalation and pre-emptive action.”

Finally, the fact that North Korea fired off 10 of the KN-23 missiles during the past four months shows it has no shortage of inventory, Narang said, suggesting that Kim has kept a promise made at the beginning of last year to move to a new phase of mass-producing missiles and nuclear bombs.

Saturday's test appeared to show off a second type of short-range missile, which the state-run Korea Central News Agency described as a new weapon that has an “advantageous tactical character different to the existing weapon systems.”

Jeffrey Lewis, a scholar at the Middlebury Institute, said it was too soon to be sure about this new weapon but said it looked like a different class of short-range missile, similar in shape but larger than the U.S. Army Tactical Missile System or Israel's Long Range Attack (LORA) missile.

But the tests have not only been designed to raise North Korea's military capabilities. They also have helped Kim bolster his reputation at home as a strongman determined to defend the regime's security.

Kim may have come under domestic pressure after not winning many concrete benefits from his engagement with the United States and his moratorium on nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile tests, experts say. This latest round of tests may have helped shore up that flank.

But the tests have had the added benefit of ramping up pressure on the United States to return to the negotiating table with a better offer than Trump presented in Hanoi in February. They can also help North Korea drive a diplomatic wedge between Washington and Seoul, by threatening South Korea without crossing any red line for Trump.

North Korea has insisted that its launches are merely a response to joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises. It says Trump had promised to halt those exercises when he met Kim. But it has reserved its most bitter vitriol for the South Koreans, labeling them warmongers and pledging to exclude them from any future dialogue with the United States.

Trump has not leaped to the defense of his ally, nor of the military exercises. Instead, he has sided with North Korea by defending its right to test short-range missiles, boasting that Kim sent him another “beautiful letter” last week and explaining that he has “never been a fan” of the U.S.-South Korea war games because he doesn't like “paying” for them.


__________________________________________________________________________

Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tokyo, covering Japan and the Koreas. He served previously as bureau chief in China, and in India; a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, New Delhi, Islamabad and Kabul; and as a Reuters correspondent in Nairobi, New York and London. He is author of Rogue Elephant: Harnessing the Power of India's Unruly Democracy, and the co-editor of Foreign Correspondent: Fifty Years of Reporting South Asia. He has also made frequent TV and radio appearances, including on BBC, CNN, NPR, PBS, Fox News, MSNBC, CNBC and Sky News, as well as India's NDTV, Times Now and CNN-IBN. Denyer holds a MA with honors in economics from Trinity College.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump again appears to take North Korea's side against his own military, allies

 • North Korea's missile tests raise stakes for Trump's personal diplomacy with Kim

 • North Korea announces firing of tactical guided weapon


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/fast-low-and-hard-to-stop-north-koreas-missile-tests-crank-up-the-threat-level/2019/08/15/adf3f3e4-bdc3-11e9-aff2-3835caab97f6_story.html

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