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 21 
 on: August 20, 2019, 01:04:05 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 22 
 on: August 19, 2019, 05:13:32 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Only one trouble with claiming that.

Everything in the article is verifiable simply by looking at Trump's tweets.

In other words, according to you, everthing Trump posts via Twitter is “fake news”.

In other words, you are admitting that Trump is a LIAR.

Haw haw haw ... talk about being stupid and kicking an “own goal”, eh?

 23 
 on: August 19, 2019, 01:19:26 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
FAKE NEWS

 24 
 on: August 18, 2019, 11:50:00 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Trump has one playbook, and very few plays left in it

He’s mastered tweeting from the bleachers but still struggles with the complexities of governing.

By DAN BALZ | 12:23PM EDT — Saturday, August 17, 2019

President Donald J. Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.

AFTER a week in which the threat of recession rocked global financial markets, his trade war with China showed no signs of progress and the government of Israel got into a nasty dispute with two members of Congress, President Trump went to bed on Thursday night with other weighty issues on his mind.

“Great news,” he tweeted. “Tonight we broke the all-time attendance record previously held by Elton John at #SNHUArena [Southern New Hampshire University] in Manchester!”

This is the frivolous mind-set of the president of the United States. Trump's statements over the past few days have brought into focus once again something fundamental about him: He has little understanding of what it means to govern. He would rather tweet from the bleachers.

The 800-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average at the middle of last week and an inverted yield curve (an arcane but much-watched economic indicator) underscored why there is broad and growing concern about the direction of the economy.

Germany saw its economy contract in the past quarter and other nations' economies appear to be slowing. The U.S. economy has been growing, and the stock market managed to regain some of the ground lost by week's end. But given what is happening globally, how long this extended period of growth can last is a major issue for American families — and a consequential issue for Trump's political future.

The president's trade war with China has contributed to the problems now facing the global economy. Yet the president accepts no responsibility — for his policies, his statements or his tweets, all of which have added to the uncertainty. He has a mixed message: Everything is great, and what isn't great is somebody else's fault.

Trump was reduced again last week to doing what he always does when there is trouble brewing. He attacked others. He hurled more insults at Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell, a Trump appointee who has become the president's favored whipping boy. He blamed Powell for raising interest rates too high and now for not lowering them quickly or enough. “The Fed is holding us back,” he said in one tweet, which inexplicably ended with, “We will win!”

The Fed wasn't the only institution in Trump's sights as talk of economic problems intensified. He lashed out at another favored target: the media. “The Fake News Media is doing everything they can to crash the economy because they think that will be bad for me and my re-election,” he tweeted.

Does anyone not believe that his principal focus these days is re-election?

Under pressure, Trump backed off his threat to impose a major new round of tariffs on China on September 1, moving the deadline back to December 15. Analysts had warned that the new tariffs, which would hit a broad range of consumer goods, could have had a negative impact on the holiday shopping season in the United States.

The president offered an upside-down explanation. “The American consumer is fine with or without the September date, but much good will come from the short deferral to December,” he tweeted. “It actually helps China more than us, but will be reciprocated.”

The president showed the sophistication of his thinking on another China issue, the huge pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong that have rattled the Chinese leadership. “It's a very tricky situation,” he explained to reporters. “I think it will work out and I hope it works out, for liberty. I hope it works out for everybody, including China.”

The president offered no support for the demonstrators who have been massing for weeks in protest. Nor did he warn China against taking action to put down the protests. Unlike past presidents, he declined to stand for American values or the importance of human rights. He appears unwilling to criticize the Chinese government for fear that it would jeopardize resolving the trade war. For Trump, human rights can wait.

But the president was willing to offer Chinese President Xi Jinping some advice about Hong Kong. Calling Xi “a great leader” and “a good man in a ‘tough business’,” he recommended: “If President Xi would meet directly and personally with the protesters, there would be a happy and enlightened ending to the Hong Kong problem,” he wrote. “I have no doubt!”

In another part of the world, Trump decided to stand with the government of Israel against two members of Congress, pressuring the Israelis to block an official visit to their country by Representatives Rashida Tlaib (Democrat-Michigan) and Ilhan Omar (Democrat-Minnesota).

Trump tweeted that a decision by Israel to allow Tlaib and Omar to enter the country would be showing “great weakness,” adding, “They hate Israel and all Jewish people and there is nothing that can be said or done to change their minds…. They are a disgrace!”

The two first-term congresswomen, who happen to be Muslim, have been highly critical of Israel and its treatment of the Palestinians. They support the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement against Israel.

But the Israeli government's decision drew sharp criticism from Democratic lawmakers and the pro-Israel lobby AIPAC. Senator Marco Rubio (Republican-Florida) said in a tweet that he disagreed “100%” with the views of Tlaib and Omar but added, “Denying them entry into #Israel is a mistake.”

(The Israeli government later said Tlaib could enter briefly on humanitarian grounds to see her elderly grandmother, who lives in the West Bank. But the government said she would have to sign a pledge not to promote a boycott of Israel. Tlaib declined the offer under those conditions.)

The president has tried to portray Tlaib, Omar and Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (New York) and Ayanna Pressley (Massachusetts) as the face of a radical Democratic Party and targeted them with a racist tweet urging them to “go back” to where they came from, even though three were born in the United States and all are citizens.

Meanwhile, the president is talking about trying to buy Greenland, a story first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Really.


Supporters listen as Trump speaks in New Hampshire. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.
Supporters listen as Trump speaks in New Hampshire. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.

The president's supporters still love him, as his rally in New Hampshire on Thursday again showed. The president put on quite a show, a rambling discourse that lasted more than an hour and a half and revisited old lines and familiar themes (sometimes more than once).

Former New York mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani sent out a series of rapturous tweets about it, comparing Trump with former presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton. “These are masterful performances,” he wrote in one tweet. “No one in America can excite a crowd like @realDonaldTrump…. This is a unique and potent political weapon.”

Meanwhile, a new Fox News poll of the 2020 campaign showed Trump losing to every Democrat tested. More telling was that the incumbent president did not break 40 percent against any of them. Polls are polls, and the election is more than a year away, but those numbers should concern the president's advisers.

Trump is following the same limited playbook that got him elected. Whether those tactics have the same potency they once did is the question that will determine his and the country's future. Meanwhile, serious problems are in front of him, and he is struggling to find the answers.


__________________________________________________________________________

Dan Balz is chief correspondent at The Washington Post. He joined The Post in 1978 and has been involved in political coverage as a reporter or editor throughout his career. Before coming to The Washington Post, he worked at National Journal magazine as a reporter and an editor and at the Philadelphia Inquirer. At The Post, he has reported on 10 presidential campaigns. The first political convention he covered was the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968. He is the author of several books, including two bestsellers. He was born in Freeport, Illinoid, and served in the U.S.Army. He is a regular panelist on PBS's “Washington Week” and is a frequent guest on the Sunday morning talk shows and other public affairs programs.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump defends economic record at New Hampshire rally


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-has-one-playbook-and-very-few-plays-left-in-it/2019/08/17/b2ad7738-c062-11e9-b873-63ace636af08_story.html

 25 
 on: August 18, 2019, 11:49:29 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Yeah, you keep sticking up for the kidfucker Trump.

It makes me wonder what is hiding in your closet.

 26 
 on: August 18, 2019, 06:08:42 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
you're talking bullshit and lies again you commie queer cum-bucket





 27 
 on: August 18, 2019, 06:01:11 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
you commie dog-turds are not worth giving 2 fucks about the dribble that comes from your anus-mind

 28 
 on: August 18, 2019, 04:03:26 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from the Sunday Star-Times…

The rabble over The Ditch

No-one should be shocked by the ravings of Alan Jones.

By FINDLAY MACDONALD | 5:00AM — Sunday, 18 August 2019

Alan Jones has stepped up his criticism of PM Jacinda Ardern, labelling her “gormless” over her climate change policy. — Photographs: Getty Images.
Alan Jones has stepped up his criticism of PM Jacinda Ardern, labelling her “gormless” over her climate change policy.
 — Photographs: Getty Images.


ONE OF THE ADVANTAGES of living in New Zealand rather than Australia is that you rarely have to think about Alan Jones.

Last week was an exception, largely because our media find irresistible any mention of New Zealand by a foreign celebrity, even one as ludicrous and discredited as the former Wallabies coach-turned-talkback rabble-rouser.

For the record, Jones treated his breakfast radio audience on Sydney's 2GB to a typically foam-flecked rant about Jacinda Ardern's suggestion that Australia would have to “answer to the Pacific over climate change”.

Jones wondered whether Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison had been briefed to “shove a sock down her throat”, called her a “lightweight” and a “clown”, said she should “shut up”, and generally confirmed what everyone knows already — that he's a reactionary blowhard without an off switch.

In nearly every report of his semi-coherent diatribe Jones was described as a “shock jock” (or by one wag, a “sock jock”).

It's an easy shorthand, but it's really not that accurate — no one is shocked any more by the illiberal mental dandruff that sprinkles from his head.

It might play well with the professionally offended warriors of wokeness on Twitter to pretend outrage, but that's just oxygen to a life-form such as Jones, which thrives on being perceived as the enemy of political correctness.

So, Jones's intemperate gibbering received entirely too much coverage here, a reminder perhaps that cultural cringe is slow to die this side of the ditch.


Alan Jones has been slapped on the wrist by ACMA more than any other broadcaster this decade. — Photograph: Jenny Evans.
Alan Jones has been slapped on the wrist by ACMA more than any other broadcaster this decade.
 — Photograph: Jenny Evans.


In Australia it wasn't such big news, inured as its long-suffering citizenry is to the kind of ad hominem raving that passes for conservative opinion in some quarters.

In the end Jones issued an apology — by calling in live to his own radio station, of course.

Whether he was truly contrite or simply heading off calls for an advertising boycott is impossible to say. But it reinforces the impression that words don't particularly matter to motormouths like Jones, they are simply deployed in the moment for maximum impact or to mitigate the consequences of their original utterance.

In 1999 it was revealed that Jones and fellow broadcaster John Laws had indeed been selling their opinions for corporate bucks in the so-called “cash for comment” scandal.

Neither's career was unduly affected; their words worth millions, their values as free as the air into which they are breathed.

Laws retired in 2007, leaving Jones in a league of his own. Go back only a couple of electoral cycles and he was laughing that then-Prime Minister Julia Gillard's recently deceased father had “died of shame” and that she should be “put into a chaff bag and thrown into the sea”.


Alan Jones once said that former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard's father had died of shame. — Photograph: Scott Barbour/Getty Images.
Alan Jones once said that former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard's father had died of shame.
 — Photograph: Scott Barbour/Getty Images.


Before that he was found by the Australian media watchdog to have made comments before the infamous Cronulla riots in Sydney that were “likely to encourage violence or brutality and to vilify people of Lebanese and Middle Eastern backgrounds on the basis of ethnicity”.

And at the heart of Jones' attack on Ardern was his apparent belief that climate change science is a hoax.

In this he most resembles our own talkback veteran Leighton Smith, who also stands bravely apart from global scientific consensus.

In truth, though, we have no equivalent in New Zealand to the right wing opinion mill that grinds out inflammatory soundbites and column inches in Australia.

Yes, Mike Hosking, Duncan Garner, Paul Henry and the late Paul Holmes have all flirted occasionally with fuelling the ratings fire with combustible garbage.


Paul Henry had a history of making controversial comments, but it pales in comparison to Alan Jones. — Photograph: Lawrence Smith.
Paul Henry had a history of making controversial comments, but it pales in comparison to Alan Jones.
 — Photograph: Lawrence Smith.


But next to Jones and his peers — Laws, Andrew Bolt, Miranda Devine, Piers Akerman, Kyle Sandilands or ex-pat Kiwi Derryn “the human headline” Hinch — our lot look like a bunch of choirboys.

That's partly a measure of more general cultural differences. New Zealanders just aren't as brash, as confrontational or (let's be honest) as good at insults as their neighbours.

And without getting into a debate about our supposedly more progressive social and racial record, there's little doubt you can get away with saying stuff in Australia that you wouldn't here, at least with the mic switched on.

Theirs' is a country, remember, where Pauline Hanson's idiotic motion that “it's okay to be white” was only narrowly defeated in the Senate.

With political dog whistles like that coming from the top is it any wonder sections of the mass media wag their tails?

There is a theory that this weaponising of opinion by populist broadcasters such as Jones is really a calculated strategy: play to a redneck base with bigotry and vulgarity, garner mainstream attention by being outrageous, and thus stay relevant and rating.

In which case, you have to wonder why we insist on taking the bait.

Perhaps the unpalatable truth is that by my writing this and you reading it, Alan Jones has already proved his point.


__________________________________________________________________________

Finlay Macdonald is a New Zealand journalist, editor, publisher and broadcaster. He is best known for editing the New Zealand Listener. Macdonald lives in Auckland with his partner, media executive Carol Hirschfeld. They have two children, Will and Rosa. His father was the late journalist Iain Macdonald.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Malcolm Turnbull blasts ‘misogynist’ Alan Jones over his Jacinda Ardern comments

 • Alan Jones attacks 'hypocrite' Jacinda Ardern again as climate change row escalates

 • Who is this outrageous Australian shockjock Alan Jones?

 • Australian PM slams Alan Jones' call to ‘shove a sock down throat’ of Jacinda Ardern


https://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-star-times/115052547/noone-should-be-shocked-by-the-ravings-of-alan-jones

 29 
 on: August 18, 2019, 04:03:15 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Meanwhile, on the island nation of Tuvalu, the southwest Pacific region's pariah island-continent nation is graphically displaying their true, “fuck you” bullying colours to the small nations of the region…






 30 
 on: August 18, 2019, 04:02:51 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



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