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 21 
 on: March 17, 2019, 12:15:30 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Australia provided fertile ground for Islamophobic culture, experts say

The alleged gunman's rhetoric, and the target, suggest the influence
of a newer, global and Internet-inspired extremism.


By ADAM TAYLOR and RICK NOACK | 6:41PM EDT — Friday, March 15, 2019

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on March 15, 2019, condemned the deadly attack on two mosques in New Zealand on Friday afternoon. — Photograph: James Gourley/Getty Images.
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on March 15, 2019, condemned the deadly attack on two mosques in New Zealand on Friday afternoon.
 — Photograph: James Gourley/Getty Images.


SHORTLY AFTER the shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, that left 49 people dead Friday, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison confirmed that the primary suspect was an Australian citizen and denounced him as a right-wing “terrorist.”

“We stand here and condemn absolutely the attack that occurred today by an extremist, right-wing, violent terrorist,” Morrison told a news conference.

Authorities in New Zealand arrested a suspect and charged him with murder but have not released his name. In a manifesto published online before the attack, the alleged gunman describes himself as “an ordinary white man, 28 years old. Born in Australia to a working class, low income family.”

Australian media reports have suggested that the man worked as a personal trainer in Grafton, a city in the state of New South Wales, after graduating from school in 2009 and before leaving to travel in Europe and Asia two years later.

It remains unclear whether he had established links to far-right groups, but such groups have been active in Australia for decades. Some experts say that anti-Muslim rhetoric has been normalized by mainstream right-wing news outlets, many of which are owned by billionaire Rupert Murdoch.

These publications have fomented “the kind of Islamophobic culture which makes it easier for extremists to think that they are legitimized to enact their deadly fantasies,” said Ghassan Hage, a Lebanese Australian academic at the University of Melbourne.

But although Australia may be fertile ground for far-right radicalization, the suspect's rhetoric — and, notably, the target — also suggests that the motivation for the attack was not traditional far-right nationalism, but a newer kind of international, Internet-inspired extremism.

“The fact is that he chose New Zealand quite carefully,” said Aurelien Mondon, an expert on the far right at the University of Bath in Britain. “He wanted to make clear that Muslims weren't safe anywhere.”

Australia has a history of far-right groups that have targeted immigrants and minorities. From the start of the 20th century, the country adopted a number of policies designed to exclude immigrants of non-European origin. These measures, known collectively as the White Australia policy, were fully abandoned only in 1973.


Australian Senator Pauline Hanson removes a burqa she wore into the Senate chamber in Canberra in 2017 to press for a ban on the garment. Hanson heads the anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant One Nation party. — Photographs: Lukas Coch/Associated Press.
Australian Senator Pauline Hanson removes a burqa she wore into the Senate chamber in Canberra in 2017 to press for a ban on the garment.
Hanson heads the anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant One Nation party. — Photographs: Lukas Coch/Associated Press.


In the mid-1990s, far-right political parties such as Pauline Hanson's One Nation were able to draw on anti-immigrant sentiment against Asians to gain a small foothold in national politics. In recent years, One Nation and other right-wing groups have gained new political relevance by pivoting to the issue of Muslim immigration from the Middle East and South Asia.

Though most of those groups focus on Australian concerns, the manifesto released before Friday's attack indicated the alleged gunman had moved to New Zealand specifically to carry it out, suggesting it would show that Muslims were not safe “even in the remotest areas of the world.”

In the manifesto and several videos of the attack, there was only fleeting mention of Australia. Instead, there were repeated references to far-right movements and incidents in other countries, including the United States, France, Norway and Serbia, as well as memes and in-jokes popular with online far-right groups.

Mondon said such references were indicative of a new generation of the Australian far right. “This kind of international alt-right, for want of a better term, are really Internet-based,” he said, adding that they were “much closer to what you've seen in the United States in recent years” and “more violent and less interested in the parliamentary game” than previous Australian far-right movements.

Established far-right parties such as Hanson's One Nation have largely refrained from commenting on the Christchurch shooting so far. However, Fraser Anning, an independent senator from Queensland, released a message saying that Muslims “may have been the victims today,” but “usually they are the perpetrators.”

“The real cause of bloodshed on New Zealand streets today is the immigration program which allowed Muslim fanatics to migrate to New Zealand in the first place,” Anning said in his statement.

Mehreen Faruqi, Australia's first female Muslim senator, accused Hanson and Anning of normalizing language used to target Muslims.

“This is the consequence of the Islamophobic and racist hate,” Faruqi wrote on Friday on Twitter.


__________________________________________________________________________

Rick Noack reported from Berlin.

Adam Taylor writes about foreign affairs for The Washington Post. Originally from London, he studied at the University of Manchester and Columbia University.

• Rick Noack currently covers international news from Australia and New Zealand for The Washington Post. He is usually based in The Post's Berlin bureau. Previously, he worked for The Washington Post from Washington D.C. as an Arthur F. Burns Fellow and from London. Originally from Germany, he studied at Sciences Po Paris, Johns Hopkins University and King's College London.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/australia-provided-fertile-ground-for-suspect-in-christchurch-massacre/2019/03/15/81ac9c9c-4734-11e9-94ab-d2dda3c0df52_story.html

 22 
 on: March 17, 2019, 12:15:17 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Demonizing Muslims and immigrants leads to predictable results

Where does responsibility lie?

By JENNIFER RUBIN | 2:42PM EDT — Friday, March 15, 2019

The New Zealand national flag is flown at half-staff on the Beehive executive wing, at Parliament building in Wellington on Friday evening. — Photograph: Marty Melville/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
The New Zealand national flag is flown at half-staff on the Beehive executive wing, at Parliament buildings in Wellington on Friday evening.
 — Photograph: Marty Melville/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


THE HORRIFIC MASSACRE in Christchurch, New Zealand, which has taken at least 49 lives, reminds us of the slaughter at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, which reminds us of the murders of innocents in a Charleston, South Carolina, church. White supremacy. Fear of an invasion. Conspiratorial, apocalyptic thinking. The alleged murderer in New Zealand — as in the other incidents — tells us exactly why the attacks occurred.

The Washington Post reports:


Quote
The 74-page manifesto left behind after the attack was littered with conspiracy theories about white birthrates and “white genocide.” It is the latest sign that a lethal vision of white nationalism has spread internationally. Its title, “The Great Replacement”, echoes the rallying cry of, among others, the torch-bearing protesters who marched in Charlottesville in 2017.

President Trump issued a perfunctory message of condolence on Friday and then went back to decrying the special counsel's investigation and claiming victimhood for himself.

I cannot help but think back to the actions President George W. Bush took in the wake of September 11. Bush went to an American mosque just days later. Instead of stoking division and Islamophobia, he told Americans:


Quote
America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens, and Muslims make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country. Muslims are doctors, lawyers, law professors, members of the military, entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, moms and dads. And they need to be treated with respect. In our anger and emotion, our fellow Americans must treat each other with respect.

Women who cover their heads in this country must feel comfortable going outside their homes. Moms who wear cover must be not intimidated in America. That's not the America I know. That's not the America I value.

I've been told that some fear to leave; some don't want to go shopping for their families; some don't want to go about their ordinary daily routines because, by wearing cover, they're afraid they'll be intimidated. That should not and that will not stand in America.

Those who feel like they can intimidate our fellow citizens to take out their anger don't represent the best of America, they represent the worst of humankind, and they should be ashamed of that kind of behavior.

That is how a responsible leader of a pluralistic democracy that enshrines religious freedom behaves. It might have been Bush's finest moment as president. He knew the temptation was there to blame Muslims indiscriminately for the 9-11 attacks and that anti-Muslim violence and rhetoric would tear at the fabric of American society.

Now we are confronted with yet another white-nationalist attack. The Anti-Defamation League put out a statement, which read in part:


Quote
“This attack underscores a trend that ADL has been tracking: that modern white supremacy is an international threat that knows no borders, being exported and globalized like never before,” said ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt. “The hatred that led to violence in Pittsburgh and Charlottesville is finding new adherents around the world. Indeed, it appears that this attack was not just focused on New Zealand; it was intended to have a global impact.”

As has become a pattern with white supremacist violence, the shooter not only meticulously planned the attack, but also designed it for social media, even live streaming it on Facebook. The fact that his video is still accessible on several social media websites is a reminder that these platforms need to do more to stem the flow of hateful messages and memes on their platforms, especially white supremacist memes targeting Muslims, Jews and other minorities.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to the media during a news conference in Wellington. — Photograph: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images.
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to the media during a news conference in Wellington. — Photograph: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images.

In the third year of Trump's presidency we've witnessed the president stoke irrational and baseless fears of Muslim invaders (hence the travel ban and the lies about Middle East terrorists mixed into the caravan). We've seen him declare that there were “very fine” people were among the neo-Nazi marchers in Charlottesville, who chanted the white nationalist theme (“Jews will not replace us”) — the same “replacement” ideology apparently at the heart of the New Zealand attacks.

Trump has hired advisers who believe the United States is in a life-and-death struggle with Islam, blurring the distinction between members of a worldwide religion and fundamentalists responsible for terrorism attacks. He has falsely labeled acts of terrorism from radicalized people in the United States as evidence of the Muslim threat he tells his followers they should fear. He has virtually ignored right-wing domestic terrordespite its rise in the United States and around the world:


Quote
The threat of far-right political terrorism, for one, is a growing concern in North America and Western Europe, according to the findings. While the United Kingdom, Spain, Finland, Sweden, and Austria were the only countries to experience increases in deaths from terrorism in Western Europe, both Canada and the U.S. experienced increases in total deaths in North America.

Far-right groups and individuals caused 66 deaths and launched 127 attacks in the regions between 2013 and 2017. The majority of attacks, according to the findings, were carried out by lone actors with far-right, white nationalist or anti-Muslim beliefs.

If one wanted to follow Trump's rationale, they'd ban immigration from the countries identified above. But that would be insane, you say, because it ignores the scourge of domestic terrorism and casts suspicion on millions of innocent people. Precisely.

Trump has at his disposal a right-wing media that trumpets his themes and echoes his baseless accusations. The alt-right and white nationalists fill social media with the same blind hatred. Ordinary MAGA fans listen to Trump's venom again and again.

In this cauldron of Islamophobia, racism and xenophobia, we have seen a sizable increase — 17 percent in 2017 — in hate crimes in the United States. What did we expect would happen?

Did Trump “cause” the mosque killing? No. The murderer(s) are responsible for the deaths of innocents, for the assault on religious freedom, for an act of unimaginable evil. Does Trump contribute to the broader problem, amplifying rather than discouraging (as Bush did) Islamophobia? Yes. Does Trump give legitimacy to “replacement” ideology by creating a moral equivalence between its proponents and anti-Nazi protesters? Yes. Does he prefer to fuel fear of Muslims at the expense of taking serious and sustained effort against right-wing terrorism? Absolutely.

Bush put it best: “Those who feel like they can intimidate our fellow citizens to take out their anger don't represent the best of America, they represent the worst of humankind, and they should be ashamed of that kind of behavior.” He never conceived that such a person would occupy the Oval Office.


Worshippers pray for victims and families of the Christchurch, New Zealand, shootings during a Friday-evening vigil at a mosque in Lakemba, New South Wales, Australia. — Photograph: Mark Goudkamp/via Associated Press.
Worshippers pray for victims and families of the Christchurch, New Zealand, shootings during a Friday-evening vigil at a mosque in Lakemba,
New South Wales, Australia. — Photograph: Mark Goudkamp/via Associated Press.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jennifer Rubin writes reported opinion from a center-right perspective for The Washington Post. She covers a range of domestic and foreign policy issues and provides insight into the conservative movement, the Republican Party and threats to Western democracies. Rubin, who is also an MSNBC contributor, came to The Post after three years with Commentary magazine. Prior to her career in journalism, Rubin practiced labor law for two decades, an experience that informs and enriches her work. She is a mother of two sons and lives in Northern Virginia.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: New Zealand prime minister: ‘Our gun laws will change’

 • VIDEO: ‘Seeking answers’: New Zealand officials investigate mosque attacks that killed 49

 • Primary suspect, one alleged accomplice identified in terrorist attack that killed 49 in New Zealand

 • Among mosque victims: Parents, children, refugees

 • How Facebook and YouTube spread shooting video

 • Trump downplays risk of white nationalism: ‘It's a small group of people’

 • The Washington Post says: Trump sends the wrong message on New Zealand. World leaders must denounce the attack.

 • Elizabeth Bruenig: The New Zealand attack and the fundamental thoughtlessness of evil

 • Max Boot: Not all terrorism is treated equally

 • Anne Applebaum: Radicalism kills. Why do we only care about one kind?

 • Molly Pascal: Muslims embraced Jews when we were slain at worship. We must support them.

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: The scene after dozens killed in terrorist attack at mosques in New Zealand


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/03/15/demonizing-muslims-immigrants-leads-predictable-results

 23 
 on: March 14, 2019, 11:26:51 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 24 
 on: March 14, 2019, 11:13:06 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Yep ... you just proved you ARE Woodville's village dumbarse.

 25 
 on: March 14, 2019, 11:11:21 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Hahaha ... the stupid Trump supporters are getting desperate as their idiot idol gets shown up more and more every day as America's laughing stock emperor with no clothes.

Who'd have thought it, eh? That America would elect President Dumbshit as their 45th president.

Now wonder America is declining as China is rising.

 26 
 on: March 14, 2019, 01:24:58 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIqMmaR2gVs

 27 
 on: March 14, 2019, 07:03:32 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
the idiot who invented communism was a satanist he wrote plenty of poems proving what he believed and showing this fact
i bet he believed in the tooth fairy

 28 
 on: March 14, 2019, 06:58:38 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
Bezos is a dickhead

 29 
 on: March 14, 2019, 06:57:01 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants

all communist are parasites

 30 
 on: March 14, 2019, 06:54:43 am 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9TyASfZV0c

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