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 11 
 on: September 20, 2018, 07:59:13 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Trump feels angry, unprotected amid mounting crises

The president’s latest attack on his attorney general underscores
his lack of trust in many of his subordinates and appointees


By ASHLEY PARKER and PHILIP RUCKER | 9:18PM EDT — Wednesday, September 19, 2018

President Donald J. Trump listens to Polish President Andrzej Duda speak during a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on September 18, 2018. — Photograph: Calla Kessler/The Washington Post.
President Donald J. Trump listens to Polish President Andrzej Duda speak during a joint press conference in the East Room
of the White House on September 18, 2018. — Photograph: Calla Kessler/The Washington Post.


PRESIDENT TRUMP's declaration that “I don't have an attorney general” was not merely the cry of an executive feeling betrayed by a subordinate.

It was also a raw expression of vulnerability and anger from a president who associates say increasingly believes he is unprotected — with the Russia investigation steamrolling ahead, anonymous administration officials seeking to undermine him and the specter of impeachment proceedings, should the Democrats retake the House on November 6.

In a freewheeling and friendly interview published on Wednesday, Trump savaged Attorney General Jeff Sessions, mocking the nation's top law enforcement official for coming off as “mixed up and confused” during his Senate confirmation hearing and for his “sad” performance on the job.

Though Trump has long railed against Sessions, both publicly and privately, for recusing himself from overseeing the Justice Department's Russia probe, the president's comments to Hill TV brought his criticism to a new level.

“I don't have an attorney general,” Trump said. “It's very sad.”

Publicly, at least, Trump is going through the ordinary motions of being president. He met with the visiting president of Poland and on Wednesday toured the flood-ravaged Carolinas to survey damage from Hurricane Florence. He also prepared to hit the campaign trail with rallies in Nevada on Thursday and in Missouri on Friday, and next week he will host scores of foreign dignitaries at the United Nations General Assembly in Manhattan.

Behind the scenes, however, Trump is confronting broadsides from every direction — legal, political and personal.

The president, as well as family members and long-time loyalists, fret about whom in the administration they can trust, people close to them said, rattled by a pair of devastating, unauthorized insider accounts this month from inside the White House. A senior administration official penned an anonymous column in The New York Times describing a “resistance” within to guard against the president's impulses, while Bob Woodward's new book, Fear: Trump in the White House, offers an alarming portrait of a president seemingly unfit for the office.

“Everybody in the White House now has to look around and ask, ‘Who's taping? Who's leaking? And who's on their way out the door?’ It's becoming a game of survival,” said a Republican strategist who works in close coordination with the White House, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly.

Some of Trump's allies believe he has legitimate cause for worry.

“The president should feel vulnerable because he is vulnerable — to those that fight him daily on implementing his agenda,” Stephen K. Bannon, a former chief White House strategist, wrote in a text message.

“The Woodward book is the typed up meeting notes from ‘The Committee to Save America’,” he added, referring dismissively to a loose alliance of advisers who saw themselves as protecting the country from Trump. “The anonymous op-ed is the declaration of an administrative coup by the Republican establishment.”

In some respects, Trump has maintained a sanguine outlook. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort last week became the latest former member of the president's inner circle to agree to cooperate with federal prosecutors. But Trump has been uncharacteristically calm about the plea deal for Manafort, whom he had praised only a month ago for refusing to “break” under pressure from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Asked if he was worried about Manafort's cooperation agreement, Trump told reporters on Wednesday: “No, I'm not…. I believe that he will tell the truth. And if he tells the truth, no problem.”

Trump has been similarly restrained this week as federal judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, his pick for the Supreme Court, fights to save his nomination amid an accusation of sexual assault, which Kavanaugh denies. Trump has publicly defended Kavanaugh, though he has refrained from attacking the judge's accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

White House officials, who began this week reeling from the assault allegation, said by mid-week that they have concluded Kavanaugh would probably still win confirmation, especially given Ford's reluctance to testify at a public Senate Judiciary Committee hearing scheduled by Republicans for Monday.

Nonetheless, Trump's screed against Sessions underscored the president's sense of anger and what he considers to be a betrayal by his attorney general, who, despite executing much of the president's hard-line, law-and-order agenda, has never been able to recover from what Trump views as an unforgivable sin: his recusal from the Russia investigation for a conflict of interest, which ultimately led to Mueller's appointment.

Trump told Hill TV that he appointed Sessions out of blind loyalty, a decision he now regrets. Sessions's aggressive and controversial immigration actions — including emphasizing “zero tolerance” for those who come to the country illegally and defending the administration policy of separating families — have been cheered by Trump allies. But the president criticized his attorney general even on this front, in a striking expression of his deep dissatisfaction.

“I'm not happy at the border, I'm not happy with numerous things, not just this,” Trump said, referring to the Russia probe.


Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks during an event at the Department of Justice in Washington earlier this month. — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks during an event at the Department of Justice in Washington earlier this month.
 — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


The president's attack on Sessions raised concern in the law enforcement community and also prompted reactions ranging from exasperation to outright dismay.

“Trump doesn't just blur the lines, he flat out tries to eradicate those lines,” said Joyce Vance, a former U.S. attorney in Alabama nominated by President Barack Obama. “He wants a consigliere, not an attorney general. On the one hand, it's a pitiful thing to watch, but it's also deadly serious, because the attorney general does not protect the president. The attorney general protects the American people. And the fact that we have a president who doesn't understand that is alarming.”

A former White House official was similarly disturbed. “It is a complete disgrace the way that Trump is acting like a schoolyard bully against Sessions,” the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity to share a critical opinion. “I understand his frustration. I understand why he feels the way that he does. But what a child. What an absolute baby. He's disgracing himself.”

In the interview, Trump belittled Sessions, whom he has previously dubbed “Mr. Magoo” and, according to Woodward's book, dismissed as “mentally retarded.”

“He went through the nominating process and he did very poorly,” Trump said of Sessions's Senate confirmation hearing. “He was giving very confusing answers, answers that should have been easily answered. And that was a rough time for him, and he won by one vote, I believe. You know, he won by just one vote.”

Trump went on to question Sessions's self-recusal from the Russia investigation.

“He said, ‘I recuse myself, I recuse myself’,” Trump told Hill TV. “And now it turned out he didn't have to recuse himself. Actually, the FBI reported shortly thereafter any reason for him to recuse himself. And it's very sad what happened.”

It was not clear what Trump meant.

Career Justice Department ethics officials had told Sessions he had to step aside from any campaign-related investigations because he had been a top campaign surrogate and met with the Russian ambassador.

FBI officials would not have been among those providing advice. Then-FBI Director James B. Comey said at a congressional hearing that he was aware of nonpublic information that he believed would force the attorney general to step aside before Sessions did so, though he declined to specify what those facts were.

After taking yet another public tongue-lashing from the president, Sessions gave a speech on Wednesday to law enforcement officials in Waukegan, Illinois, in which he effusively praised Trump.

“Under his strong leadership, we are respecting police again and enforcing our laws,” Sessions said, according to his prepared remarks, which a DOJ spokesman said he delivered. “Based on my experience meeting with officers like you across the country, I believe that morale has already improved under President Trump. I can feel the difference.”

Even as Sessions was dutifully showering compliments upon his boss, Trump was unwilling to throw him a lifeline.

“I'm disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons,” Trump told reporters before leaving for North Carolina. “You understand that.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Devlin Barrett, John Wagner and Matt Zapotosky contributed to this report.

Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. Rucker also is a Political Analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump: ‘I'm disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons’

 • ‘I don't have an attorney general’: Trump escalates his attacks on Jeff Sessions

 • You only need a one-question test to identify a narcissist


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/he-is-vulnerable-trump-feels-angry-unprotected-amid-mounting-crises/2018/09/19/e33ca996-bc26-11e8-b7d2-0773aa1e33da_story.html

 12 
 on: September 19, 2018, 06:30:55 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants

 13 
 on: September 19, 2018, 06:01:27 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

New U.S.-China tariffs raise fears of an economic Cold War

The trade dispute could be leading to a commercial divorce and the uncoupling of a 40-year relationship.

By DAVID J. LYNCH and DANIELLE PAQUETTE | 7:32PM EDT — Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Delivery workers pull carts loaded with boxes of goods for their customers outside an office building in Beijing. By next week, the United States and China appear likely to be on the brink of slapping tariffs on their entire goods trade, which exceeds $635 billion annually. — Photograph: Andy Wong/Associated Press.
Delivery workers pull carts loaded with boxes of goods for their customers outside an office building in Beijing. By next week, the United States and China appear
likely to be on the brink of slapping tariffs on their entire goods trade, which exceeds $635 billion annually. — Photograph: Andy Wong/Associated Press.


CHINA said on Tuesday it would retaliate for President Trump's latest tariff salvo, risking further U.S. trade actions that could result in what some analysts are calling an economic Cold War.

By next week, the United States and China appear likely to be on the brink of slapping tariffs on their entire goods trade, which exceeds $635 billion annually.

Chinese officials in Beijing said they would meet the 10 percent tariffs that Trump announced on Monday on nearly $200 billion in imports with similar measures on $60 billion in U.S. products. If that occurs, Trump has said he will “immediately” begin the process of applying tariffs to all Chinese items entering the United States.

The showdown comes as Chinese officials were preparing to travel to Washington for new talks aimed at resolving the months-old trade dispute. Negotiations earlier this year failed to make much progress and it remains unclear whether Chinese officials will resume bargaining in the wake of the president's latest escalation.

As hopes dim for an early end to the conflict, the likelihood grows that the two countries are moving toward some sort of commercial divorce. Some analysts anticipate an economic partition reminiscent of the globe-splitting divide between the United States and the Soviet Union following World War II.

“We're probably talking about a world with two centers: a China-centered economic domain … and another centered on the United States,” said Aaron Friedberg, a professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University, who handled China policy as an aide to Vice President Richard B. Cheney in the George W. Bush administration. “It's heading toward a bifurcated global economy.”

Such a fundamental reshaping of the U.S.-China commercial relationship after nearly four decades of growing interdependence would ripple through the global economy, shaking financial markets, reordering business supply chains and perhaps even raising the danger of military conflict, analysts said.

The two countries' annual goods trade, which has almost doubled since 2006, is roughly equal to the output of Argentina, which is widely considered to have the world's 21st-largest economy.

For now, a genuine breakdown in the U.S.-China relationship, affecting roughly 40 percent of the global economy, remains a long-term prospect. The immediate prospect is for the trade dispute to percolate for the remainder of this year, gradually ratcheting up the economic pain in both countries.

Trump says the tariffs are needed to compel China to abandon a host of unfair trade practices, including making American companies surrender their trade secrets in return for access to the Chinese market and subsidizing state firms in advanced-technology industries.

“The purpose of the tariffs is to modify China's behavior,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said on CNBC. “The real purpose is not to end up with tariffs. The real purpose is to end up with a level playing field so that American firms can compete properly.”

The newest tariffs will hit consumer goods such as appliances and auto parts, but Ross insisted the impact would be so slight that “nobody's going to actually notice it at the end of the day.”

That's unlikely to be true in every case. The 25 percent tariffs that Trump imposed on imported washing machines in January quickly translated into sticker shock for shoppers. Over the past year, retail prices rose 13.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In the short run, the president's newest tariffs will be weaker than his earlier trade actions, as a strong dollar allows Americans to overlook any modest price increase on Chinese goods.

The president announced on Monday that he will hit up to $200 billion in Chinese goods — itemized on a 194-page list — with a 10 percent tariff starting from September 24. That's a smaller tax than the 25 percent levy he applied to $50 billion of imports from China in July, as well as the foreign steel and aluminum shipments that he began taxing in March.

Changes in the value of the U.S. dollar and China's currency over the course of this year are certain to sap some of the new tariffs' power. Since early February, the dollar has gained more than 6 percent against the Chinese yuan, a move that could erode more than half of the new tariffs' impact.

“This shows you how complex it is to narrow the trade deficit,” said Torsten Slok, chief international economist for Deutsche Bank Securities. “Tariffs are a small part of the picture. There are many other moving parts and the rising dollar is offsetting some of the effects.”

The drop in China's currency likewise will exaggerate the effect of China's retaliatory tariffs, making goods imported from the United States even more expensive for Chinese customers.

“American exporters now face a double whammy in terms of their competitiveness in the Chinese markets due to China's retaliatory tariffs and the strengthening of the dollar,” said economist Eswar Prasad of Cornell University, who formerly was the head of the International Monetary Fund's China division.

Under Trump's plan, the tariff pain on the $200 billion batch of Chinese goods will grow on January 1, 2019, rising to 25 percent from the original 10 percent. If there remains little sign of diplomatic progress by that point, more companies may switch their orders from Chinese suppliers to factories in countries such as Vietnam or India, executives said.

“We have not yet seen any significant shift in the customer supply chains. However, if the situation continues for any amount of time, we do expect customers to diversify their supply chains and perhaps some of the trade patterns might change,” Rajesh Subramaniam, executive vice president of FedEx, told investors last week.

As the president pursues his uncompromising approach to China, business leaders are growing increasingly frustrated. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Association of Manufacturers and the National Retail Federation were among those blasting the administration's use of tariffs as costly and counterproductive.

“We are disappointed that the administration seems to continue to misunderstand the complexities and reality of global trade,” said Ed Black, president of the Computer & Communications Industry Association. “There are many legitimate trade concerns U.S. companies have in the global marketplace, but tariffs are unwieldy and often counterproductive to address those problems.”

China's Foreign Ministry said it will respond to Trump's latest round of tariffs with duties on more than 5,200 types of American imports, including industrial parts, chemicals and medical instruments.

Trump has promised to respond to Chinese retaliation with further tariffs on the remainder of Chinese imports — which he has variously characterized as $267 billion or $257 billion worth of products. Goldman Sachs published a research note on Tuesday saying that announcement could come within “the next couple of weeks” with imposition sometime early next year.

“If he does that, we're just headed inevitably for an economic Cold War with China,” said economist Gary Hufbauer of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. “Down this path, we will see a limitation of all economic contact.”

The administration also has taken steps to discourage Chinese investment in the United States. Congress this year passed legislation, with the backing of the White House, to scrutinize more closely a wider array of potential Chinese acquisitions of American technology companies.

“People are very focused on tariffs. But that's just one element,” said Michael Hirson, director for Asia at the Eurasia Group. “The non-tariff measures are equally important and may be a longer lasting legacy.”

Some administration hard-liners would be content to see the trade and investment restrictions lead to a decoupling of the U.S. and Chinese economies, Hirson said.

That could be costly, according to Caroline Freund, director of macro trade and investment at the World Bank.

If 25 percent tariffs were applied to all U.S.-China trade, and investors withdrew, the U.S. economy would be 1.6 percent — or $320 billion — smaller than under normal trading circumstances while China would lose 3.5 percent of its gross domestic product, according to a presentation Freund gave on Monday at the Peterson Institute.

At the White House on Tuesday, Trump said that while he might make a deal with Chinese President Xi Jinping “at some point,” his focus for now remains on tariffs.

“We are always open to talking. But we have to do something,” the president said. “We have a tremendous trade imbalance with China, tremendous trade deficit. And the way I look at it: Last year, we lost over $500 billion to China. We can't do that. I don't want to do that. And that's been going on for many years. Other presidents should have taken care of this situation, and they didn't. But I'm going to.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Danielle Paquette reported from Beijing. Luna Lin and Yang Liu in Beijing contributed to this report.

David J. Lynch joined The Washington Post in November 2017 from the Financial Times, where he covered white-collar crime. He was previously the cybersecurity editor at Politico and a senior writer with Bloomberg News, focusing on the intersection of politics and economics. Earlier, he followed the global economy for USA Today, where he was the founding bureau chief in both London and Beijing. He covered the wars in Kosovo and Iraq, the latter as an embedded reporter with the U.S. Marines, and was the paper's first recipient of a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University. He has reported from more than 60 countries.

Danielle Paquette is a reporter focusing on national labor issues. Before joining The Washington Post in 2014, she covered crime for the Tampa Bay Times in St. Petersburg, Florida. Her byline has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Cosmopolitan and on CNN.com. She has also reported stories from Kigali, Rwanda, and Davos, Switzerland.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/new-round-of-us-china-tariffs-raise-fears-of-an-economic-cold-war/2018/09/18/749ec99a-bb74-11e8-bdc0-90f81cc58c5d_story.html

 14 
 on: September 19, 2018, 05:33:40 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Meanwhile, your hero Donald J. Trump, has threatened “fire & fury” on other countries.

In other words, Trump has threatened mass-murder on a gargantual scale.

So either murder is alright, or murder is not alright.

So which is it?

Dumbarse!!

 15 
 on: September 19, 2018, 05:28:27 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
so your hero wants to be a murderer
well done loony moron
the left are owned by the 1%
why dont they help
then the right will have an excuse to wack them all

viva the revolution against the madness

 16 
 on: September 19, 2018, 04:22:21 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

A man threatened to shoot Trump.
Three months and six states later, feds can't find him.


Shawn Richard Christy is a “survivalist” who has fled across six states and Canada,
and who has also threatened Sarah Palin, U.S. marshals say.


By ALEX HORTON | 11:39AM EDT — Tuesday, September 18, 2018

A U.S. marshal in Hazleton, Pennsylvania. — Photograph: Ellen F. O'Connell/Hazleton Standard-Speaker/Associated Press.
A U.S. marshal in Hazleton, Pennsylvania. — Photograph: Ellen F. O'Connell/Hazleton Standard-Speaker/Associated Press.

A MAN who threatened President Trump in June has eluded federal agents across six states and Canada, prompting school closures in an Ohio town after authorities said he sped off the road there in a stolen truck.

Authorities say Shawn Richard Christy, 27, has made threats against numerous officials, including Trump, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin (Republican) and a Pennsylvania district attorney. A federal warrant for his arrest was issued on June 19.

“Keep it up Morganelli, I promise I'll put a bullet in your head as soon as I put one in the head of President Donald J. Trump,” Christy wrote that day on Facebook, the U.S. Marshals Service said in a statement. He referred to John Morganelli, the Northampton County district attorney east of Christy's hometown of McAdoo, Pennsylvania.

Christy is a self-proclaimed survivalist familiar with dense wooded areas in eastern Pennsylvania, said Robert Clark, the U.S. marshal supervising deputy of the investigation.

“He feels he can operate in the woods without human contact, and that has presented a challenge for us,” Clark told The Washington Post on Tuesday.

About a dozen agents are looking for Christy each day, which Clark said makes it a challenge to scour vast thickets of woods he has been known to frequent. Agents had hunted through a 55,000-acre area near his home, Clark said.

Christy has also allegedly stolen numerous cars, pistols and a shotgun in his cross-border escape. Authorities believe that includes a pickup truck stolen in Pennsylvania on Sunday and recovered later in the afternoon in Mansfield, Ohio.

That prompted school closures in the town Monday and Tuesday as authorities searched the area, Fox Cleveland reported. Clark said authorities involved in the search, including the FBI and Secret Service, think he is still in Ohio.


Shawn Richard Christy. — Photograph: U.S. Marshals Service/Associated Press.
Shawn Richard Christy. — Photograph: U.S. Marshals Service/Associated Press.

Clark said Christy's parents reported a cryptic Facebook message he sent to them, saying he “was slowed down a bit” after injuring his knee in a “getaway” in Maryland.

“Stay safe, I have a mission to complete,” the message said.

Clark believes Christy was referring to an incident in Cumberland, Maryland, in August, when a civilian found a man identified as Christy sleeping in a car. He fled the area, Clark said.

“At this point, we don't know what that mission is,” he said.

Christy's path has also cut through northern New York, West Virginia and Kentucky. He has multiple arrest warrants in Pennsylvania and said he will use “full lethal force on any law enforcement officer that tries to detain me,” marshals said.

He pleaded guilty in 2011 to harassing Palin's attorneys with hundreds of threatening phone calls and was sentenced to probation, The Morning Call reported, then spent two years in federal prison after he left a halfway house in violation of his sentence.

He speaks with a noticeable lisp, the marshals said. There is a $20,000 reward for information leading to his arrest.


__________________________________________________________________________

Alex Horton is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post. He previously covered the military and national security for Stars and Stripes, and served in Iraq as an Army infantryman.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2018/09/18/man-threatened-shoot-trump-three-months-six-states-later-feds-cant-find-him

 17 
 on: September 19, 2018, 03:42:14 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

China says it will immediately retaliate when Trump tariffs take effect

Beijing has warned it will impose tariffs on $60 billion in American goods.

By DANIELLE PAQUETTE | 10:17AM EDT — Tuesday, September 18, 2018

A container truck moves past containers at the Yangshan Deep Water Port in Shanghai, China, on April 24, 2018. — Photograph: Aly Song/Reuters.
A container truck moves past containers at the Yangshan Deep Water Port in Shanghai, China, on April 24, 2018. — Photograph: Aly Song/Reuters.

BEIJING — Beijing struck back on Tuesday against President Trump's new tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports, vowing it would immediately retaliate when they take effect and threatening a protracted dispute that could raise the prices of household goods in both countries.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has refused to budge amid mounting threats from Trump, who vowed to place higher border taxes on practically everything the United States buys from China if Beijing unveils new duties, effective from Monday at noon.

“In order to safeguard our legitimate rights and interests and the global free trade order, China will have to take countermeasures,” the country's Ministry of Commerce said in a statement. “We deeply regret this.”

The Chinese government will impose tariffs of up to 10 percent on an additional $60 billion in American goods following Trump's escalation, slapping higher border taxes on nearly all U.S. exports to China.

Officials also signaled that they would add a complaint about the latest U.S. action to more than a dozen China has already lodged with the World Trade Organization.

Trump accused China in a pair of tweets on Tuesday of targeting American workers in the heartland, wrongly saying the country had “openly stated” it was aiming to sway U.S. elections. (Beijing's earlier round of tariffs, launched in July, hit U.S. soybeans and pork, among other goods.)

“China has openly stated that they are actively trying to impact and change our election by attacking our farmers, ranchers and industrial workers because of their loyalty to me,” Trump wrote.

“There will be great and fast economic retaliation against China if our farmers, ranchers and/or industrial workers are targeted!” he added.

Analysts said Xi's defiance reflects his desire to present China to the world as a superpower.

“China needs to show that it will stand up to Trump and the United States in order to demonstrate to the rest of the world that it is now America's rival,” said Shaun Rein, managing director at the China Market Research Group in Shanghai.

Trump's latest measures inject uncertainty into the status of the trade talks, Chinese officials said, suggesting the commercial battle between the world's two largest economies could drag on indefinitely.

Beijing said it hopes the American president will “correct” his actions before the Monday deadline, urging the White House to consider the far-reaching consequences. Economists say the cost of consumer products such as air conditioners, furniture, lamps and handbags will rise, since many American manufacturers assemble goods on Chinese soil.

But Trump has pledged to punch back if Beijing retaliates, this time on $267 billion in Chinese products.

China purchased roughly $130 billion in American goods last year — less than a third of what the United States ordered from Chinese enterprises. Now Beijing is poised to impose higher border taxes on a total of $110 billion in U.S. products.

China's Foreign Ministry said it will respond to Trump's latest round of tariffs with duties on more than 5,200 types of American imports, including industrial parts, chemicals and medical instruments.

Chen Dingding, founder of the think tank Intellisia in Guangzhou, said China will continue to welcome negotiations.

“We will fight and talk at the same time,” he said.

China's vice premier, Liu He, was expected to visit Washington next week to restart negotiations with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, but analysts say the $200 billion development likely knocked that meeting off the table.

Fang Xinghai, vice chairman of China's securities regulator, said at a forum in Tianjin on Tuesday that Trump's tactics have “poisoned” the deal-making atmosphere.

Trump's announcement landed in China on September 18, a day considered the start of Japanese aggression 87 years ago and an anniversary some Chinese see as an informal day of national humiliation.

Beijing has said it would also unleash “qualitative” measures against the United States, which some American firms have interpreted as heightened regulations and stalled visas.

The threat of more tariffs on $60 billion in U.S. products — and Trump's pledge to target an additional $267 billion in Chinese goods if that retaliation materializes — have worried the American business community in China.

“Contrary to views in Washington, China can — and will — dig its heels in, and we are not optimistic about the prospect for a resolution in the short term,” William Zarit, chairman of the American U.S. Chamber of Commerce in China, said in a statement on Tuesday.

China has maintained that it is well positioned to withstand blows in a geopolitical tussle, even as the nation's growth is projected to slow this year.

The country's central bank, meanwhile, has allowed its currency to slide about 5 percent since January, giving Chinese exports an edge in overseas markets while making imports costlier. (On Tuesday, it cost 6.88 renminbi to buy a dollar.)

Analysts say the People's Bank of China probably will not greenlight much more tumbling, since a fading renminbi (RMB) could spook more assets out of the country.

“The weakening of the RMB could help offset the new tariffs,” said Larry Hu, chief China economist at Macquarie Commodities and Global Markets, a consultancy in Hong Kong. “However, it will also hurt China itself.”

Other signs of weakness in China's economy as the trade war escalates include cooling consumer spending, slowing infrastructure investment and a relatively low but growing rate of corporate bond defaults.

The Shanghai Composite Index, meanwhile, has plummeted more than 20 percent since the year's start, with losses snowballing after Trump launched the trade war.

Some analysts have predicted that the business uncertainty will prompt layoffs in China, which has a tight labor market, with unemployment at 3.8 percent.

But demand for Chinese products on American soil has jumped amid rising tensions: The latest census data, released on Wednesday, showed the U.S. goods deficit with China this year has grown about 8 percent to $234 billion from the same time last year.

Deutsche Bank economists Zhiwei Zhang and Yi Xiong estimated in a September analysis that an escalated trade war would shave only a half percentage point off the country's growth. Goods to the United States, they noted, accounted last year for just 12 percent of China's total exports.

“The Chinese authorities likely feel no urgency to give in and agree with all the terms the U.S. side requested,” Zhiwei and Yi wrote.

Tim Stratford, former assistant U.S. trade representative and managing partner of the global law firm Covington's Beijing office, predicted at a World Economic Forum panel in Tianjin on Tuesday the fight would see no winner soon.

“They're concerned the U.S. motivation is wanting to keep China down,” Stratford said. “I expect therefore we're going to have a deadlock for quite some time.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Luna Lin and Yang Liu contributed to this report.

Danielle Paquette is a reporter focusing on national labor issues. Before joining The Washington Post in 2014, she covered crime for the Tampa Bay Times in St. Petersburg, Florida. Her byline has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Cosmopolitan and on CNN.com. She has also reported stories from Kigali, Rwanda, and Davos, Switzerland.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump praises his tarrifs' ‘tremendous impact on China’

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/china-could-soon-target-practically-all-us-imports-as-it-retaliates-in-trade-war/2018/09/18/7a12708a-bac9-11e8-adb8-01125416c102_story.html

 18 
 on: September 19, 2018, 03:21:46 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Trump administration slaps tariffs on roughly $200 billion more
in Chinese goods — a move almost certain to trigger retaliation


The move puts new import taxes on about half of all the goods
Americans buy from China, including common household items.


By DAVID J. LYNCH and DAMIAN PALETTA | 2:45PM EDT — Monday, September 17, 2018

A U.S. flag is seen during a welcoming ceremony in Beijing, China, on November 9, 2017. — Photograph: Thomas Peter/Reuters.
A U.S. flag is seen during a welcoming ceremony in Beijing, China, on November 9, 2017. — Photograph: Thomas Peter/Reuters.

PRESIDENT TRUMP threw his biggest punch yet at China, imposing tariffs on an additional $200 billion worth of Chinese imports and gambling that American consumers are willing to pay more for popular products to wring trade concessions from Beijing.

With Monday's announcement, roughly half of the $505 billion in goods that Americans buy annually from Chinese firms will face new import levies.

Unlike the $50 billion in Chinese products that Trump hit in the first tariff wave, in July — which fell mainly on industrial goods — Monday's action will affect consumer products such as air conditioners, spark plugs, furniture and lamps.

Starting from September 24, American importers will pay an extra 10 percent tariff for the affected items, rising to 25 percent at the end of the year, according to senior administration officials, who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity.

China has vowed to retaliate against the latest U.S. tariffs with new import taxes on $60 billion in American products. If that happens, the president said he would immediately begin the process of approving tariffs on a further $267 billion in Chinese imports — effectively taxing everything Americans buy from China.

Trump acted — accusing China of posing “a grave threat to the long-term health and prosperity of the United States economy” — even as Chinese officials weighed an invitation to visit Washington for talks aimed at ending the months-old dispute.

“The Trump administration is yet again sending a perplexing mixed message by inviting Chinese officials for negotiations and then imposing additional tariffs in the run-up to the talks,” said Eswar Prasad, former head of the International Monetary Fund's China division. “It is difficult to see what the administration's vision of an end game might be other than total capitulation by China to all U.S. demands.”

Trump said the tariffs are designed to force China to change a range of unfair trade practices, including compelling American companies to surrender their technology in return for access to the Chinese market.

“For months, we have urged China to change these unfair practices, and give fair and reciprocal treatment to American companies,” the president said. “We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly. But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices.”

Trump has described the tariffs as leverage in negotiating Chinese policy changes with Chinese President Xi Jinping. But several preliminary rounds of talks have yielded no agreement and Trump has said he was in no hurry to settle the dispute.

“We stand ready to negotiate with China any time if they are willing to move towards serious talks to remedy trade problems,” White House National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow said in New York on Monday.

He said China had to agree to some of the White House's demands for any progress to be made.

“He has not been satisfied with the talks with China on this,” Kudlow said of Trump.

In deciding to proceed with additional tariffs, the president ignored pleas from hundreds of U.S. companies that appeared at public hearings last month to oppose the new levies. Executives complained that the tariffs would make their products more expensive, costing them sales.

The U.S. Trade Representative's office received roughly 6,000 written comments when Trump first proposed the new tariffs, most opposing them.

Initial reaction from the business community on Monday was unfavorable.

“Let's face it, nobody on either side has any idea how long this tariff war will last or where it will end up,” said Rufus Yerxa, president of the National Foreign Trade Council. “Setting aside whether this would be a successful negotiating tactic by the president, which only time will tell, the rapid escalation of tariffs and increasing uncertainty will cause significant short-term harm to both businesses and consumers.”

Jim O'Sullivan, chief economist for High-Frequency Economics, said financial markets will probably adopt a “could have been worse” reaction to the latest tariffs.

At the White House, Trump wrongly said that “China is now paying us billions of dollars in tariffs” and he celebrated the Treasury Department collecting “tremendous amounts of money, which is great for our country.”

In fact, tariffs are taxes that are paid by Americans who import goods from abroad. Through the end of August, the administration had collected nearly $22 billion in revenue because of its new tariffs, according to the non-partisan Tax Foundation.

Officials agreed to exclude roughly 300 product categories from the final product list, including bluetooth electronics, car seats for children, and some chemicals. Apple won waivers for several of its popular consumer products including the Apple Watch.

The president has long been fiercely critical of China, accusing it during the 2016 campaign of “the rape” of the American economy and vowing to create a more balanced trade pattern. Yet despite months of tariff talk, the gap between what the United States buys from China and what it sells there continues to widen.

Through July, the United States ran a $233.5 billion trade deficit in goods trade with China, an 8 percent increase compared with the same period in 2017.

The tariff duel is causing companies that rely on Chinese factories to rethink their business relationships, said Craig Allen, president of the U.S.-China Business Council. “These supply chains are incredibly complex and the disruption will be inflationary,” he said. “There's no way around it.”

So far, however, the U.S. economy has shrugged off the president's trade war. Although individual companies have complained about their operations being disrupted by material shortages or cost increases, growth remains strong and unemployment is approaching a half-century low.

Excluding fuel, import prices rose just 1.3 percent over the past year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

But uncertainty over trade policy remains unusually high. The United States is trying to negotiate a new North American trade deal even as it threatens to impose national security tariffs on imported automobiles, especially those from Europe.

The president on Monday said he will soon reach new deals with U.S. trading partners that will reverse the offshoring trend of the past generation. “What's going to happen is businesses will start moving back into the United States, which to me is — that's the dream,” Trump said. “The businesses are going to pour back into the United States. That's jobs, that's a lot of other things; that's a lot of taxes coming to us. And product will start being made here again.”

Trump's showdown with China also could intensify. The president has threatened to expand his tariffs to cover all Chinese imports, an escalation that many economists say would be costly.

“Attempts to help those hurt by globalization via higher tariffs or other forms of protectionism, even if well meaning, will raise prices and hurt all consumers, especially poor and middle-class families,” said economist Satyam Panday of S & P Global Ratings. “Not to mention damage the competitiveness of companies that import raw materials and components from other countries and folks who work in export industries.”

China no longer can match U.S. tariffs on a dollar-for-dollar basis, since it imports only $135 billion of American products. But Chinese officials have other ways of making the United States hurt, including by harassing American multinationals with tax audits and customs inspections or mobilizing consumer boycotts against them.

Business groups are pinning their hopes for defusing the standoff on talk that Trump and Xi could meet this fall on the sidelines of an international gathering such as the Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires in November.

A decision to back away from confrontation with China could only be made by one man. “China trade is now a presidential level, political issue. It was not under Obama. And it was not under Bush,” said Derek Scissors, a China expert at the American Enterprise Institute. “Now everything is subject to the president deciding.”


__________________________________________________________________________

David J. Lynch joined The Washington Post in November 2017 from the Financial Times, where he covered white-collar crime. He was previously the cybersecurity editor at Politico and a senior writer with Bloomberg News, focusing on the intersection of politics and economics. Earlier, he followed the global economy for USA Today, where he was the founding bureau chief in both London and Beijing. He covered the wars in Kosovo and Iraq, the latter as an embedded reporter with the U.S. Marines, and was the paper's first recipient of a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University. He has reported from more than 60 countries.

Damian Paletta is White House economic policy reporter for The Washington Post. Before joining The Post, he covered the White House for The Wall Street Journal.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/trump-administration-slaps-tariffs-on-roughly-200-billion-more-in-chinese-goods--a-move-almost-certain-to-trigger-retaliation/2018/09/17/15ded2f0-b215-11e8-a20b-5f4f84429666_story.html

 19 
 on: September 19, 2018, 01:45:20 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

Trump's nasty fight with China's middle class could extend the trade war

Growing anger at what is seen as Trump’s bullying could make compromise over trade harder.

By DANIELLE PAWUETTE | 6:18AM EDT — Monday, September 17, 2018

A man looks at his smartphone as he stands near video display screens showing an image of Chinese President Xi Jinping along a street in Beijing. — Photograph: Mark Schiefelbein/Associated Press.
A man looks at his smartphone as he stands near video display screens showing an image of Chinese President Xi Jinping along a street in Beijing.
 — Photograph: Mark Schiefelbein/Associated Press.


BEIJING — A dock worker from the eastern port city of Ningbo said he wants China to stand unflinchingly against President Trump's demands.

A salesman in Beijing hopes his country will keep punching back in the commercial ring — even if it hurts his wallet.

And a coffee shop owner in the Chinese capital said Trump's tariffs have inspired her to retaliate at the store: She's swapping U.S. products for Chinese brands.

As the trade war between the world's two largest economies unfolds on the international stage, analysts say Trump's brash approach to try to win concessions from Beijing has provoked a public fury that could ultimately thwart his efforts.

Chinese President Xi Jinping's iron grip on power depends on healthy support from the nation's exploding middle class, and now that middle class, angered with Trump's escalating threats, expects China's leader to respond with strength. This could make finding a compromise to end the escalation even more difficult.

The American president tossed more fuel on this fire on Monday when he said that he intends to trigger levies on additional Chinese imports, seemingly voiding an invitation sent days earlier from Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to rekindle negotiations.

Hours earlier Monday, Trump tweeted: “If countries will not make fair deals with us, they will be ‘Tariffed!’” he said on Twitter.

The tough tone effectively ties Xi's hands, said James Zimmerman, former chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China.

“Getting the Chinese to the bargaining table should be all about face-saving — not a chest-thumping exercise,” Zimmerman said. “Xi has no choice but to stand firm and stand tall.”

Until the past few days, when Trump stepped up his tweeting about the negotiations with Beijing, public opinion in China appeared in recent months to be leaning in Trump's favor.

Members of the middle class, a force of as many as 400 million people in both blue-collar jobs and professional roles, per government estimates,had been posting criticism of Xi's leadership online, particularly when it came to his dealings with the United States, said Cheng Li, a contemporary China scholar at the Brookings Institution in Washington.

The unease came as the country's stock markets plunged nearly 24 percent from January peaks, and the Chinese currency dropped almost 10 percent against the dollar this year amid the trade tensions. Rising rent, debt and grocery store prices also played into citizens' concerns.

Officials have responded to the growing anxiety by blaming Trump and framing Beijing as the adult trying to cool a geopolitical tantrum. China's retaliatory tariffs on $50 billion in U.S. goods this summer, they said, were measured responses forced by Trump's swings.

The message appears to have stuck, Li said.

“The middle class has been critical of the Chinese government, but now that anger is shifting to the United States,” he said. “Chinese media has portrayed Trump as greedy and crazy.”

Trump has threatened to slap duties on practically everything the United States buys from China, a $505 billion order. He wants China to buy more U.S. goods, correcting what he considers an unfair relationship, and to stop stealing intellectual property from American companies.

But to some Chinese, the U.S. president just looks like a bully.

Chen Weiyong, 64, a retired dock worker from coastal Zhejiang province, said he thinks Trump is taunting China by moving the goal posts.

“He says one thing one day and does another the next,” he said.

Chen, who spent decades unloading cargo ships at one of the country's major ports, said he has seen the nation's commercial power up close. That muscle, he said, could survive without the United States. “The chain will not break,” he said, giving Xi's defiance a thumbs up.

Li Yunfei, a 35-year-old salesman in Beijing, said he expects the cost of food to soar as the trade war heats up. He is especially worried about soybean oil, which he uses to cook just about everything.

Still, he would take the financial hit.for his country “The government must fight back,” he said.

Rill Liu, 40, who runs a cafe in Dongsi, a Beijing neighborhood known for a network of traditional alleyways called hutongs, said Xi's actions do not concern her, “an ordinary person.”

China, however, is full of ordinary people who hear the United States' insults.

After Trump started publicly slamming her country, she said she protested with her shopping cart. “Before we used Apple, but now we've changed to Huawei,” she said of the Chinese phone maker. “It makes you emotional like that.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Yang Liu contributed to this report.

Danielle Paquette is a reporter focusing on national labor issues. Before joining The Washington Post in 2014, she covered crime for the Tampa Bay Times in St. Petersburg, Florida. Her byline has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Cosmopolitan and on CNN.com. She has also reported stories from Kigali, Rwanda, and Davos, Switzerland.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: How to win a trade war

 • Trump to impose tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods in trade escalation

 • U.S. companies in China are suffering in trade war, survey says

 • Trump threatens tariffs on $267 billion in Chinese goods

 • Businesses beg for tariff relief as trade war with China rolls on


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/trump-started-a-nasty-fight-with-chinas-middle-class-that-could-extend-the-trade-war/2018/09/17/887bb05e-ba43-11e8-b1c5-7a2126bc722c_story.html

 20 
 on: September 19, 2018, 01:01:31 pm 
Started by Im2Sexy4MyPants - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



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