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 1 
 on: Today at 12:13:18 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants

do you think he must have eaten a lot of peanuts?

 2 
 on: Today at 12:10:44 am 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
haha


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=207&v=0qpOHMwBj84

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 11:53:00 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey



 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:51:37 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey


 5 
 on: Yesterday at 11:01:51 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
she should keep her hair covered and join the Muslim faith to prove to the world she's not a white racist

hahaha the Nobel peace prize

Reward(s):
Prize money of 9 million SEK – Just over $1 million USD (2017), a medal (sold for up to $4.76 million USD), and a diploma.

I think she's after the job of being in charge of the one world government

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 10:41:07 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The New York Times…

EDITORIAL: America Deserves a Leader
as Good as Jacinda Ardern


New Zealand's prime minister moved swiftly to ban weapons
of mass killing after a gunman attacked two mosques.


By THE NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIAL BOARD | Friday, March 21, 2019

New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern. — Photograph: Edgar Su/Reuters.
New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern. — Photograph: Edgar Su/Reuters.

THE murder of 50 Muslim worshipers in New Zealand, allegedly by a 28-year-old Australian white supremacist, will be long scrutinized for the way violent hatreds are spawned and staged on social media and the internet. But now the world should learn from the way Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand's prime minister, has responded to the horror.

Almost immediately after last Friday's killings, Ms. Ardern listened to her constituents' outrage and declared that within days her government would introduce new controls on the military-style weapons that the Christchurch shooter and many of the mass killers in the United States have used on their rampages. And she delivered.

On Thursday, Ms. Ardern announced a ban on all military-style semiautomatic and automatic weapons, parts that can be used to turn other rifles into such weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. “It's about all of us,” she said, “it's in the national interest and it's about safety.”

Earlier in the week, she told Parliament that social media sites must address the ease with which the internet can be used to spew hate and images of violence. “We cannot simply sit back and accept that these platforms just exist and that what is said on them is not the responsibility of the place where they are published,” she said. “It cannot be a case of all profit, no responsibility.”

Ms. Ardern didn't propose immediate measures to limit the reach of Facebook, Twitter and other internet publishers, and it's not obvious what could be done without trampling freedom of speech. But she made clear that she believed that those social media platforms, like gun manufacturers and dealers, bore some responsibility for the carnage visited on Christchurch and so many communities in recent years.

The new gun proposal will require considerable fine-tuning and defining before it becomes law. New Zealand's existing laws are relatively lenient, and a large percentage of the estimated 1.2 million to 1.5 million firearms owned by about 250,000 people are not registered. It is not known how many of these will become illegal under the new laws.

But the display of what one deranged man can do with weapons designed for combat seemed to persuade a majority of New Zealanders, and a strong majority in Parliament, of the need to ban rapid-firing weapons.

That attitude stood in stark contrast to the way the National Rifle Association and its political allies in the United States have resisted any restrictions on weapons like the AR-15, the semi-automatic rifle used in several mass killings.

In New Zealand, it took one mass shooting to awaken the government. In the United States, even a string of mass killings — 26 dead in a school in Newtown, Connecticut; 49 in a nightclub in Orlando; 58 at a concert in Las Vegas; 17 in a school in Parkland, Florida — has not been enough. Nor has the fact that 73 percent of Americans say that more needs to be done to curb gun violence, according to recent polling.

The ban on terrorists' weapon of choice was only one of the areas in which Ms. Ardern showed what leadership looks like in time of crisis. In lieu of trite messages, she donned a black head scarf and led a group of politicians to visit victims' families; speaking without a script to a school some of the victims attended, she urged the pupils to “let New Zealand be a place where there is no tolerance for racism. Ever.” She told grieving families, “We cannot know your grief, but we can walk with you at every stage.”

And in a striking gesture, she refused to utter the name of the suspected killer. “He may have sought notoriety, but we in New Zealand will give him nothing,” she said. “Not even his name.”

After this and any such atrocity, the world's leaders should unite in clearly condemning racism, sharing in the grief of the victims and stripping the haters of their weapons. Ms. Ardern has shown the way.


__________________________________________________________________________

The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

• A version of this editorial appears in The New York Times on Saturday, March 22, 2019, on Page A22 of the New York print edition with the headline: “When Government Works”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Jacinda Ardern Is Leading by Following No One

 • New Zealand Shows the U.S. What Leadership Looks Like

 • Why Jacinda Ardern Matters

 • The Attack That Broke the Net’s Safety Net


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/opinion/new-zealand-ardern.html

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 10:40:47 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

Nomination and selection of Peace Prize Laureates




 8 
 on: Yesterday at 09:35:35 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Seattle Times…

Jimmy Carter's new milestone: Longest-lived US president

By BILL BARROW | 10:13PM PDT — Thursday, March 21, 2019

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks in September as Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams listens in Plains, Georgia. Carter is now the longest-living president in American history. — Photograph: John Bazemore/Associated Press.
Former President Jimmy Carter speaks in September as Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams listens in Plains, Georgia.
Carter is now the longest-living president in American history. — Photograph: John Bazemore/Associated Press.


ATLANTA, GEORGIA — Nearly four decades after voters unceremoniously rejected then-President Jimmy Carter's bid for a second term, the 39th president has reached a milestone that electoral math cannot dispute: He is now the longest-living chief executive in American history.

Friday is the 172nd day beyond Carter's 94th birthday, exceeding by one day the lifespan of former President George H.W. Bush, who died November 30 at the age of 94 years, 171 days. Both men were born in 1924: Bush on June 12, Carter on October 1.

It's yet another post-presidency distinction for Carter, whose legacy since leaving office has long overshadowed both his rocky White House tenure and the remarkable political rise that led him from his family peanut farm and a state Senate seat to the governor's mansion and his unlikely presidential victory in 1976.

The achievement also defies medical odds, coming more than three years after Carter announced he had melanoma that had spread to his liver and brain. He underwent treatment and received a clean bill of health.

“There are no special celebrations planned,” said Deanna Congileo, spokeswoman for the former president and The Carter Center, which Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, now 91, founded in Atlanta in 1982 to focus on global human rights issues.

The center's decades of public health advocacy, election-monitoring and conflict resolution around the world have redefined the role of former presidents, who before Carter often retired to relative obscurity.

“We at The Carter Center sure are rooting for him and grateful for his long life of service that has benefited millions of the world's poorest people,” Congileo said.

Seemingly downplaying his political career, Carter has for years characterized the center's work as his defining professional achievement — though, of course, having been a U.S. president is what allowed him the stature to establish the center.

“I spent four of my ninety years in the White House, and they were, of course, the pinnacle of my political life,” Carter wrote in a memoir published on his 90th birthday. “Those years, though, do not dominate my chain of memories, and there was never an orderly or planned path to get there during my early life.”

Rather, he continued, “Teaching, writing and helping The Carter Center evolve … seem to constitute the high points in my life.”

And the man who once held the U.S. nuclear codes, forged a historic Middle East peace deal at Camp David and tried to manage a hostage crisis that sealed his one-term fate has a simple answer whenever he's asked to recount the best or most significant decision he's ever made: “Asking Rosalynn to marry me.”


Former President Jimmy Carter speaks last year during a funeral service for former Georgia Governor Zell Miller. Carter is now the longest-living president in American history. — Photograph: John Bazemore/Associated Press.
Former President Jimmy Carter speaks last year during a funeral service for former Georgia Governor Zell Miller. Carter is now the longest-living
president in American history. — Photograph: John Bazemore/Associated Press.


The former president and first lady still live in Plains, Georgia, a town of about 750 where they were born, raised and married 73 years ago, weeks after the future commander in chief graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy.

A devout Christian, Jimmy Carter regularly teaches Sunday school at Maranatha Baptist Church, drawing hundreds of visitors to Plains for each session. The Carters pose for pictures with each attendee.

Though he sometimes de-emphasizes his elected career, living so long after his presidency is allowing Carter a resurgence of sorts in Democratic politics.

Two current presidential candidates, Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, have ventured to Plains to meet with the Carters. The former president has hosted Bernie Sanders, a 2016 and 2020 presidential candidate, for a panel at The Carter Center — and Carter told the audience that he voted for Sanders over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Democratic primary. He hosted and endorsed Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams in her unsuccessful bid for Georgia governor last year.

Georgia Democrats say they expect more presidential candidates to make a Plains pilgrimage.

As for what's next, Carter has at least one more accomplishment on his mind, pointing often to The Carter Center's long-running effort to eliminate Guinea worm disease, a parasitic infection attributed to poor drinking water.

There were 3.5 million cases in 21 countries in 1986, when the Carter Center began its eradication program. In 2018, there were 28 cases worldwide.

“I'm hoping that I will live longer than the last Guinea worm,” he said in a British television interview in 2016. “That's one of my goals in life, and I think I have a good chance to succeed.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Story updated at 4:36PM PST — Friday, March 22, 2019.

Bill Barrow is a national politics reporter for the Associated Press. Based in Atlanta, Georgia, he covered the 2018 mid-term elections and covers Democrats in the era of Donald J. Trump.

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/nation/jimmy-carters-new-milestone-longest-lived-us-president

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 03:16:46 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Kiwithrottlejockey

from The Washington Post…

‘Hiding in plain sight’: In quiet New Zealand city,
alleged gunman plotted carnage


In Dunedin, the suspected attacker frequented a gym and lived in a rented
apartment with bare walls and a bed as the only furnishing.


By SHIBANI MAHANI, WILMA McKAY and KATE SHUTTLEWORTH | 3:56PM EDT — Thursday, March 21, 2019

A police car is seen outside the accused gunman's home on March 17, 2019, in Dunedin. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.
A police car is seen outside the accused gunman's home on March 17, 2019, in Dunedin. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND — When the stocky Australian man moved into the bluish-gray house perched on a small incline in 2017, he told the young couple next door he had traveled the world and was looking to settle down.

This quiet college town, surrounded by hills and a small harbor on New Zealand's South Island, appealed to him, he said.

It was almost flattering to hear that a well-traveled bachelor in his late 20s would pick Dunedin — a city of 127,000 better known as an easy stop for visitors en route to penguin and albatross colonies.

For the next year and a half, the newcomer built a life of solitary routines, according to a dozen people who interacted with him.

He would exchange polite hellos and waves with neighbors and make frequent trips to a nearby gym, they said. His rent would always arrive on time for an apartment he kept meticulously austere, with bare walls and a bed in the living room as the only furnishing.

The next-door neighbor, Brooke, said he was so quiet that she never heard a sound from his house, even though they shared a wall. No friends visited. He had no job or discernible romantic partner.

“He was bizarrely quiet,” said Brooke, who asked to be identified only by her first name in attempts to maintain some privacy while the spotlight is on Dunedin. “You would never hear anything, not music, nothing. No one ever came round. He was always by himself.”

On the other side of the wall, [no name] — the alleged gunman in last week's mosque massacres — was apparently planning.

He trained with semi-automatic rifles at a gun club in a forest about a 45-minute drive south of Dunedin. He bulked up, hefting weights of up to 440 pounds at a 24-hour gym. Either by choice or happenstance, the gym he picked had a view of a day-care center for Muslim children across the street.

He trawled the darkest corners of the Internet, finding inspiration and kinship for his white-nationalist rage.

Investigators are still trying to piece together the full timeline and tipping points that led to the horrific spray of bullets — streamed live on the Internet — at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15 that claimed 50 lives and shook New Zealand to its core. They have named [no name], who posted a rambling 74-page manifesto on a Twitter account he created three days before the attack, as the only suspect.

A massive forensic effort, said New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush, includes the FBI, Australian police and officials from nations visited by the alleged gunman — Turkey, Bulgaria and elsewhere. It seeks “to build a comprehensive picture of this person that we will put before the court,” said Bush.

But in Dunedin — about 210 miles down the coast from Christchurch — it's also about what may have been missed.

“The other poignant feature of this for Dunedinites is, of course, the revelation that the evildoer lived among us — in my case, just three blocks away from my home,” said Michael Woodhouse, a member of Parliament based here. “He was hiding in plain sight.”


Tarrant grew up in the Australian town of Grafton. — Photograph: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images.
[no name] grew up in the Australian town of Grafton. — Photograph: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images.

The alleged shooter is said to have gone to Grafton High School. — Photograph: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images.
The alleged shooter is said to have gone to Grafton High School. — Photograph: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images.

'Like hell on earth'

[no name] was born in Grafton, a town of 18,000 near Australia's east coast known for its annual jacaranda festival, when trees bloom in a canopy of purple-hued flowers. His grandmother, 81-year-old Marie Fitzgerald, told The Washington Post she remembers him as a “lovely boy” from the early years she spent babysitting him.

“He was mostly a good kid — naughty at times just like ordinary children,” she said.

Speaking separately to an Australian news network, Fitzgerald said he spent most of his time on the computer, playing video games, and was awkward around girls.

[no name], who never went to college, became a personal trainer at a gym in Grafton between 2009 and 2011. Tracey Gray, the gym's manager, told ABC News he worked in a program that offered free gym training to children in a community hit hard by bankruptcies in the dairy industry and falling agricultural subsidies. [no name], in his manifesto, described his own family as “low income.”

He showed no obvious interest in firearms, Gray said, which are heavily restricted in Australia.

In 2010, [no name]'s father took his own life at age 49, turning to suicide after he was diagnosed with cancer as a result of asbestos exposure, Fitzgerald said. He had been a competitive athlete who participated in triathlons, according to an obituary at the time.

[no name]'s mother, Sharon, and sister Lauren have been under police protection, sequestered since the attacks. They have not spoken with the news media.

“This news is like hell on earth,” Fitzgerald told The Washington Post. “We had no idea — it hurts so much. It's a hard thing to swallow.”

Few in the city will even say his name.

But Australia nonetheless has had to grapple with the fact that the alleged shooter was one of its own, adding to the ongoing debates over Islamophobia and racism against groups including Australia’s native inhabitants. [no name] views Australia as “simply an offshoot of the European people,” he wrote in the Twitter manifesto.

“It hasn't come as a complete shock to people that things have come to a head like this,” said Tasneem Chopra, chair of the Australian Muslim Women's Center for Human Rights. “There has not been a strong counter-attack to it, [and] there's also been a lot of platforms that has been provided those views.”


Path to Dunedin

Coming into some money from his father's estate, [no name] traveled the world, apparently solo.

In 2016, he visited Turkey twice, first in March and later in September, according to the Daily Sabah newspaper. Late that year, he visited Serbia, Montenegro and other parts of the former Yugoslavia, stopping at the sites of battles between Muslims and Christians during the centuries of Ottoman rule.


Tarrant was filmed by CCTV as he arrived at Istanbul's Ataturk international airport in Turkey in March 2016. — Photograph: TRT World/Associated Press.
[no name] was filmed by CCTV as he arrived at Istanbul's Ataturk international
airport in Turkey in March 2016. — Photograph: TRT World/Associated Press.


By early 2017, he was traveling through some of the bloodiest spots of the 1990s Balkan wars, including mostly Muslim Bosnia and mostly Roman Catholic Croatia.

That spring, he was making his way across Western Europe, [no name] said in his manifesto. Here, his views on immigration were “dramatically changed.” He traveled through France, Portugal and elsewhere, he wrote in the screed, and was unsettled by a truck attack in Stockholm around that time that left a young girl dead.

His fury grew, he wrote, as he observed the 2017 French elections. In the document, he lashed out against immigration to France in particular, claiming there were so many immigrants “the French people were often in a minority themselves.”

At some stage, he also went to North Korea, apparently with a “friendship association” on closely monitored tours. A photo shows [no name], in jeans and a black sweater, kneeling in the front row of a group that had visited the Samjiyon Grand Monument. Behind them stands a huge bronze statue of North Korea's founder, Kim Il Sung.

It was right after these travels, according to property and hotel records, that [no name] came to set up base in Dunedin. After spending four nights at the cheapest available room in a city center hotel, he moved in August 2017 to a one-bedroom duplex apartment on leafy Somerville Street, which is dotted by shadows from surrounding hills.

He was unemployed but provided a reference, according to the property manager, and agreed to pay eight weeks of rent — about $1,550 — upfront. He told the property manager he had money from his father's estate. [no name], in his manifesto, said he invested in cryptocurrency, which he used to fund his travels.

“The rent came through like clockwork. All the inspections checked out fine,” said the manager of the real estate company, who spoke on the condition that neither he nor his company be named because of an ongoing police investigation. “He seemed to be in and out of the place quite often. He was doing a bit of traveling around while he was here, but we had no reason to suspect anything.”

[no name] kept the flat impeccably clean. Nothing was on the walls — no posters, photographs or paintings. Oddly, the property manager said, he had no furniture, just the bed in the living room.

“[He] didn't have any lounge furniture. But I mean, that's just quirky rather than raising a red flag or anything like that,” the property manager added. “It's just like, okay, this is the way this guy lived, that's fair enough — each to their own sort of thing.”


Tarrant purchased his first firearm from Gun City, one of the biggest gun retailers in New Zealand. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.
[no name] purchased his first firearm from Gun City, one of the biggest gun retailers in New Zealand. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.

Gun license

Three months later, in November 2017, [no name] obtained a gun license, a prerequisite for owning a firearm in New Zealand. He purchased his first firearm from Gun City, among the biggest gun retailers in the country, the next month. He bought three more up until March 2018, said David Tipple, the store's managing director.

He also bought a hunting rifle from the Dunedin branch of Hunting & Fishing, an outdoor store, in late 2017, according to Radio New Zealand.

[no name] apparently sought out a gun club and found one that suited him: Bruce Rifle Club, nestled in a forest near Milton, south of Dunedin, which has confirmed he was a member.

Recreational shooters say that no other club in the area offered shooting and target practice with military-style assault rifles. A video on YouTube of the rifle club that has since been deleted shows its members practicing on human silhouette targets, frowned upon by the vast majority of shooters in New Zealand.

“New Zealand shooting culture is very conservative,” said Grant Dodson, a recreational shooter and president of the Dunedin Clay Target Club, which uses only shotguns and clay targets. “There's not a lot of military-style semi-automatic weapons used for shooting.”

Pete Breidahl, a former member of the New Zealand military and a competition shooter, said he raised concerns about the rifle club in late 2017, according to an interview and to Facebook posts from the time that he shared with The Washington Post.

“Its ethos is appalling, everything from the ‘You can take these guns from my cold, dead hands’ mentality to their members turning up to a military shoot wearing camo,” he said in an interview. “They said stuff that scared me.”

In a statement, the Bruce Rifle Club's vice president said Tarrant “seemed like a normal person and never gave anyone reason to suspect he would carry out an attack like he has.”

“The club is feeling shocked, stunned, betrayed and used that we've had this person in our Club who has used our facilities to hone his skills to do these horrible things to some innocent human beings,” the statement added.


The alleged shooter trained at the Bruce Rifle Club near Milton, south of Dunedin. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.
The alleged shooter trained at the Bruce Rifle Club near Milton, south of Dunedin. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.

In late 2018, Tarrant took off on travels again. He visited the Gilgit-Baltistan area of northern Pakistan on the edge of the Himalayas, according to an archived version of Facebook posts that has since been deleted from the Osho Tang hotel.

In comments to CNN, the owner of the hotel described Tarrant as polite, and did not notice anything out of the ordinary.

Bulgarian officials confirmed that he also had visited the country in late 2018, flying to the capital, Sofia, and later driving to Hungary. Bulgaria's chief prosecutor, Sotir Tsatsarov, said that Tarrant spent around a week in the Balkan nation and that prosecutors are now probing whether he visited as a tourist “or if he had other objectives.”

Sometime that year, he went back to Grafton to celebrate his sister's 30th birthday, according to Fitzgerald, his grandmother.

“He was no different,” she told The Washington Post. “We all went out for dinner to a pub in Grafton, and he was pleased to see all of us. He made a speech for Lauren. He seemed happy.”


‘Could have been me’

Back in Dunedin, neighbors said, [no name] seemed obsessed with working out.

“He's a big guy — as in, he works out a lot,” said Jess Corbett, 35, a neighbor who went to the same gym, Anytime Fitness, as [no name]. “I did remember thinking when I saw him at the gym just how thick he was.”

Anytime Fitness lies directly across the road from An-Nur Childcare Center, a day care for Muslim children under age 5. The treadmills face out directly toward the center.

[no name]'s manifesto does not mention the center but does state that he initially was planning to attack the Al-Huda Mosque in Dunedin. Muslim community elders there say the mosque's security-camera system was stolen about three weeks before the Christchurch attacks.

An-Nur's owner, Mohammad Alayan, happened to be Christchurch on March 15 and was critically injured in the attack on the Al Noor Mosque, the first site targeted. The shooter's bullet hit his shoulder, just missing his heart. His son, 33-year-old football player and entrepreneur Atta Elayyan, was among those killed.

“We are still unraveling all of this,” said Haizal Hussaini, 45, who moved from Malaysia to Dunedin in 2007. “It could have been me. It could have been any of us.”

The city's small Muslim community, he said, certainly had felt pockets of racism before but never had experienced a presence of organized white nationalist or extremist groups, or felt their lives were threatened.

“There's always intolerance — you know, some words or someone pulling off a scarf [from a woman's head], or telling us to go back home,” he said. “But we never imagined this would happen, never anything like this.”

A road outside the Al-Huda Mosque is lined with flowers stretching the entire block, with declarations of solidarity and sorrow. On Thursday evening, 15,000 people — approximately a tenth of the city — gathered for a vigil to honor the lives lost.


A police presence can be seen on Somerville Street, Dunedin, near the accused gunman's home. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.
A police presence can be seen on Somerville Street, Dunedin, near the accused gunman's home. — Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images.

Officers remain stationed outside the apartment on Somerville Street, where Tarrant had paid his rent up to April 2. He told the property manager, however, he would move out by mid-March.

Investigators have not spoken publicly on forensic work or any other possible evidence they have collected. On a recent visit by The Washington Post, electricians were installing sensor lights as a precaution, guarding against harm to the property.

“Someone might try to torch the place,” said the police officer on duty.

The new tenants, a young couple in their late teens, have now changed their mind. They will not be moving in.


__________________________________________________________________________

Kate Shuttleworth reported from Cairns, Australia. Anna Fifield in Christchurch, New Zealand, and Siobhan O'Grady in Washington D.C. contributed to this report.

Shibani Mahtani is the Southeast Asia correspondent for the Washington Post, covering countries that include the Philippines, Myanmar, Indonesia and Malaysia. She joined the Post's foreign desk in 2018 after seven years as a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Southeast Asia and later in Chicago, where she covered the Midwest. She was the first Myanmar-based correspondent for the Wall Street Journal following the country's opening in 2012, and covered the elections that saw Aung San Suu Kyi come to power and their aftermath. In Chicago, she covered national news with a focus on criminal justice and policing. Shibani Mahtani's education achievements include: Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, MS Journalism, 2011; London School of Economics, BS Government and History, 2010.

• Wilma McKay is a freelance journalist and author, living in New Zealand.

• Kate Shuttleworth Kate is a New Zealand-based freelance journalist and a former foreign correspondent for The Guardian reporting from Jerusalem.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/hiding-in-plain-sight-in-quiet-new-zealand-city-alleged-gunman-plotted-carnage/2019/03/21/1846de9e-4a7b-11e9-8cfc-2c5d0999c21e_story.html

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 02:59:04 pm 
Started by Kiwithrottlejockey - Last post by Im2Sexy4MyPants
make love not war

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